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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How should the existing floor be prepared before this tile is laid? More specifically, is it OK to install this flooring over a high-quality "linoleum" still covered with dirty glue left behind from the peel-and-stick tile that has just been removed. Some balls of glue are the size of double-bubble chewing-gum. (Sorry, I can't remember that correct name of the "linoleum"; just that that it is seamless and was sold with a very good warranty)
 

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Now that I think of it I used the same product in my garage and laundry room. For my laundry room I scraped up the old linoleum and made sure there were no balls of glue or grit whenI laid the new floor. I believe this flooring product is a floating floor, right?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How should the existing floor be prepared before this tile is laid? More specifically, is it OK to install this flooring over a high-quality "linoleum" still covered with dirty glue left behind from the peel-and-stick tile that has just been removed. Some balls of glue are the size of double-bubble chewing-gum. (Sorry, I can't remember that correct name of the "linoleum"; just that that it is seamless and was sold with a very good warranty)
Now that I think of it I used the same product in my garage and laundry room. For my laundry room I scraped up the old linoleum and made sure there were no balls of glue or grit whenI laid the new floor. I believe this flooring product is a floating floor, right?
MJ, Yes, it comes with pre-glued edges that overlap creating a floating floor.
 

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Yup. Same product. I've had it in my Garage for two years now and no problems. I believe this product can be laid directly over existing linoleum floors with no problems as long as there is no lifting on the old floor.
 

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Do a careful layout so you don't run into any problems and once you stick that edge you have about 15 minutes and then it's permanent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Do a careful layout so you don't run into any problems and once you stick that edge you have about 15 minutes and then it's permanent.
MJ The flooring is already installed and looks terrific in the kitchen and laundry room. But we ran into a problem in the bathroom - preparing the sub-floor. The contractor wanted to add another $85 to the quote to remove the old, peal-and-stick tiles which had not stood up to the moisture in the bathroom. So I took up these old tiles myself. Underneath was heavy, dirty glue. I soaked the floor in TSP for 3/4 of an hour and then started scraping. I spend several hours of hard work and made progress but was far from done when I gave up for the evening. Next day the workers came and assured me that they could lay the new acrylic tile, Allure Sierra, directly over the sticky mess. I forgot to tell them about the TSP which I hadn't rinsed!! Within 24 hours white powder appeared in the seams in quite a few places. Two months later, the powder is almost negligible, but I'm still unable to find out if the seams and under-side of the new tiles are most likely permanently damaged. Should I accept the flooring as is? Or work out a deal with the contractor to re-do the bathroom floor. I'm not trying to shirk my contribution to the problem
 

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This product is fairly resistant to most chemicals but I don't know how the pre-glued seams would react to the TSP.
Did you use the TSP to help dissolve the glue on the old floor? I wonder if the TSP had a way of reacting with the seam glue resulting in the powdered seams.

You could contact the manufacturer and explain. They may be interested to what's happening.
 
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