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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
good day folks ! i just want to make sure i have this down right. so im wiring a room, 2 lights and an outlet. i have rough wiring in, pulled a 2.5 from the breaker box in the next room and run 1.5 to light fixtures and outlet and then everything leads back to the switch. i joined all the live (red) wires together (1 from supply and 3 from lights and outlet), insulate wrap it. the supply neutral i connect to one switch for a light and the neutral going to the lights to the other terminal. i then attach the neutral (black) wire leading to the outlet on the switch terminal that has the supply neutral. i then attach a piece of black wire to that same supply neutral terminal on the 1st switch and feed it over to the second near by switch and then to the other terminal connect the neutral for the second set of lights.
is that okay ? i tried the first set of lights and they worked, but just wanted to make sure.
 

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I don't know much about the codes in your country, but
What do you mean by 1.5 and 2.5? Is that the wire size?
Are those the appropriate sizes for the breaker that you have?

You should be switching the hot wire, not the neutral.

(Usually, where I'm from, the hot is black and the neutral is white.)
 

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This site is primarily North American based. A site more familiar with your region may be more appropriate due to a better knowledge of wiring practices and codes.
 

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While I cannot be sure, is the "Flag" in your post that of Guyana ?
If so, your "regulations" would be baaed on UK/European regulations.

The terms 1.5 and 2.5 usually refer to conductors which have a "Cross Sectional Area" (CSA) of 1.5 or 2.5 square millimetres respectively.
(These terms are used throughout the world (apart from in North America) and the nearest to these is 15 AWG and 13 AWG respectively.)

(Usually, 1.5 mm CSA may carry 10 A and 2.5 mm CSA may carry 20 A.)

I am certain that you may NOT mix 1.5 mm CSA and 2.5 mm CSA cables supplied from the same (Power) 20 A breaker, since 1.5 mm CSA cable is NOT rated for 20 A.

Instead of posting on this "North American" site you would be better off posting on the UK site of
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you for the feed back gentlemen, much appreciated. I will refer to the link provided by Mr. FrodoOne. (your guess was right as to the country)
 

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i have rough wiring in, pulled a 2.5 from the breaker box in the next room and run 1.5 to light fixtures and outlet
That means you need to choose a circuit breaker appropriate for 1.5 wires. Breakers protect wires, and so the breaker must match the smallest wire. It's always OK to use larger wires than are required (e.g. if the 2.5 run is a very long distance).

i then attach the neutral (black) wire leading to the outlet on the switch terminal that has the supply neutral. i then attach a piece of black wire to that same supply neutral terminal on the 1st switch and feed it over to the second near by switch and then to the other terminal connect the neutral for the second set of lights.
OK, you're doing that backwards. You need to wire it so that the hot wires are switched, and the neutral wires are not. The reason is you don't want the socket to be hot while you're changing a bulb, especially if it's a broken bulb. When you switch neutral, it is impossible to turn off the socket. When you switch hot, the socket is de-energized.
 

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If those are metric mm then 1.5 equals 16 gauge and 2.5 equals 14 gauge.
In Canada 16 gauge wire is not permitted for any permanent installed wiring. 14 gauge wire gets a 15 amp breaker.
 

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If those are metric mm then 1.5 equals 16 gauge and 2.5 equals 14 gauge.
In Canada 16 gauge wire is not permitted for any permanent installed wiring. 14 gauge wire gets a 15 amp breaker.
However, in Europe, UK, Australia, New Zealand (and, probably, Guyana) 1.5 mm² CSA conductors are rated at 10 A (or 16 A) and 2.5 mm² CSA conductors are (generally) rated at 20 A .
Circuit Breakers rated at 6 A are (generally) used for "lighting" circuits in the UK (on 1.0 mm² CSA conductors), 10 A for "lighting" circuits in Australia/NZ.

In Australia/NZ most "Domestic" Circuit Breakers are 10 A (Lighting), 20 A (Power) or 32 A (Ovens etc.)
(See Clipsal Circuit Breakers | Single Pole | Sparky Direct Online - which shows that 10, 16, 20, 25, 32, 40, 50, 63 A are the sizes generally available.
Then there are RCBOs Search results
All these devices conform to IEC specifications)

("Lighting" is allowed on 20 A protected circuits in Australia/NZ but the wiring used for this purpose must be that rated for 20 A and the Circuit Breaker marked "Power and Light")

(While European countries may utilize 16 A circuit breakers, 15 A circuit are generally NOT used - or, probably, even available - in these countries.)

The relevant table from AS/NZS 3000 (Wiring Rules) is attached.

. Font Parallel Pattern Number Slope
 
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