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retired painter
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Yes, drywall is pretty much fixable at any stage. It's not uncommon to make minor repairs after it's primed .... just don't forget the repairs will need to be primed.
 

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What will be the final finish?? Level 3 job in my area would be suitable only if the walls were going to have a heavy texture paint or wall covering. Level 4 would be standard for regular paint. Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #23
What will be the final finish?? Level 3 job in my area would be suitable only if the walls were going to have a heavy texture paint or wall covering. Level 4 would be standard for regular paint. Ron
I actually inquired with them about that and they said no level 3 is good for painting with a smooth finish. They really don't talk much about level for around here. The only time guys use level-5 is if you're going to get a ton of sunlight blasting through the windows. Otherwise everyone quotes either a level 3 or level 5. I asked them if they detail the closets the same way that they do the rest of the house and they said that they do. The owner said you never know if somebody's going to be staying in the closet looking at a particular wall so they try to do everything exactly the same.
 

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Yes I do have a written contract. They explained to me that they will do a final sand after the third layer of mud and then start priming. They said any flaws that show well stand out after they brought him and they will then correct those after I do a walk-through with them. I did notice that most of the flaws that I saw before are not really visible now after they did the third mud stage.
Good for you. You're doing your part of the job correctly and it sounds like they are doing their part correctly as well. I'm guessing you'll have a good job when it's over.

The crew chief is correct, after the last sand, the prime will show any defects - great news that he expects you to do a walk-through with him.

If you texture the wall, don't forget to re-prime. That way, the paint will NOT have it's moisture sucked out by the texture and it will adhere well and cover uniformly. Also - remember, no paint is primer & finish coat - they just aren't.

The correct way to do a wall is; hang, tape, sand, prime, texture, prime, paint color, paint color. (Yup - two coats of color is how a pro does it.) Each time you put on a raw material (joint compound while taping or texture) you MUST prime so the next layer is NOT trying to adhere to raw material.

And, now we'll hear from the folks that have "always" gotten away with one coat of some miracle paint because they believed the label!
 

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The correct way to do a wall is; hang, tape, sand, prime, texture, prime, paint color, paint color. (Yup - two coats of color is how a pro does it.) Each time you put on a raw material (joint compound while taping or texture) you MUST prime so the next layer is NOT trying to adhere to raw material.

And, now we'll hear from the folks that have "always" gotten away with one coat of some miracle paint because they believed the label!

You're mixing several things together here. First, I didn't see anyone talking about texture.


Regarding paint coats and priming, the current "paint and primer in one" are not marketing gimmicks, it's just that we can't expect more than they offer. Most are really "self priming" drywall. Which is normally the case. And they all specify 2 coats for this. If using flat paint this will normally happen anyway with a high quality coating. But there is really not a need for a primer with 2 coats of a flat paint.

With sheen paint this still usually works just fine with 2 coats of a quality paint. Most drywall primers don't do any better than this anyway. Maybe if you're using a primer such as Gardz for true sealing. Not many people need this, which should tell you something.


Finally, when we're talking about one coat coverage in terms of color saturation, yes this often does work. Neither I nor the manufacturers would recommend this, even with a "1 coat" paint over bare drywall. But for a previously primed or painted surface it will often work well.

Focusing on the number of coats rather than the thickness of the paint film is just blowing smoke. Nothing matters other than the film thickness. Some people don't know how to put on a full coat of paint, or use paint that is too runny to apply very thickly. But with the correct paint and high opaqueness, this often works very well. For example, PPG Timeless works well. I haven't tried Marquee yet, but a couple other paints that don't advertise one coat coverage have also worked well at times.
 

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Contractor/Engineer
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You're mixing several things together here. First, I didn't see anyone talking about texture.Hence the word "If" in my post...


Regarding paint coats and priming, the current "paint and primer in one" are not marketing gimmicks, it's just that we can't expect more than they offer. Most are really "self priming" drywall. Which is normally the case. And they all specify 2 coats for this. If using flat paint this will normally happen anyway with a high quality coating. But there is really not a need for a primer with 2 coats of a flat paint.

With sheen paint this still usually works just fine with 2 coats of a quality paint. Most drywall primers don't do any better than this anyway. Maybe if you're using a primer such as Gardz for true sealing. Not many people need this, which should tell you something.


Finally, when we're talking about one coat coverage in terms of color saturation, yes this often does work. Neither I nor the manufacturers would recommend this, even with a "1 coat" paint over bare drywall. But for a previously primed or painted surface it will often work well.

Focusing on the number of coats rather than the thickness of the paint film is just blowing smoke. Nothing matters other than the film thickness. Some people don't know how to put on a full coat of paint, or use paint that is too runny to apply very thickly. But with the correct paint and high opaqueness, this often works very well. For example, PPG Timeless works well. I haven't tried Marquee yet, but a couple other paints that don't advertise one coat coverage have also worked well at times.
Yup - two coats is what I think you kept saying - as the manufacturers specify. And I think you implied that a really heavy coat of paint is just as good in some cases - I guess we'll agree to disagree on that one.
And, if you prefer not priming after putting on texture - fine with me. I always gave my clients the best I could.

Have a good 2019!
 

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Yup - two coats is what I think you kept saying - as the manufacturers specify. And I think you implied that a really heavy coat of paint is just as good in some cases - I guess we'll agree to disagree on that one.
And, if you prefer not priming after putting on texture - fine with me. I always gave my clients the best I could.

Have a good 2019!

If you mean wall texture, I don't really know much about that.


Scientifically, virtually all materials are better/stronger in one coat than two, given they are the same final thickness. This is not just painting. We use multiple coats for other reasons, such as drying time or whether or not it will sag. But one thing you have some control over is the solids content of the paint. The dry film thickness will always be specified in the spec sheet. So for example if you put on 2 coats of a cheap, runny paint with a specified dry film thickness of .9 mils, or a high solids paint with a dry film thickness of 1.8 mils, you are always better off going with the single coat, with the thickness of paint on the wall at the end being the same.


So the point being, look at the dry film thickness you wish to achieve, and the color saturation of course, then use the number of coats it takes to get you there. It might be one coat, or it might be 4 coats of some reds. Saying "two coats always" is incorrect and oversimplifying.
 
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