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Discussion Starter #1
first i have a 32 breaker panel with a subpanel- the main panel has a double pole 100amp breaker for the subpanel, the subpanel has 11 open breakers.....
i am doing a 20 by 40 addition that is roughly 40' from the main panel with a bedroom living room and a full bath-closet. i think i should have a lighting cicuit and outlet circuit for each room and i will also have an outdoor hvac condencing unit.
question 1- should i switch the panel out to a 42 breaker panel and move the subpanel into the addition or just run the home runs out of the existing subpanel location?
question 2-where is the best place to look up wiring diagrams for layout purposes? i have a plan but dont know if it makes the most sense....
 

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You have the option of running wires from either existing panel. Or replacing a panel as you suggested. Or even installing a new subpanel and that could be wired to either existing panel.

My main consideration would be how easy it was to run wires from the addition to a panel. What would be the easiest.

For example it might be a pain to run multiple wires to a panel, but it would make things a LOT easier to run just one large wire to one panel and install a new subpanel. Then that would make it easy to run all the wires there for the new addition.

And secondary would be cost. One option might be less expensive than another.

Third would be easy to install new additional circuits in the future. Spare panel slots are a good thing for that!

Generally I like the idea of a subpanel located near where there will be a lot of wire runs.

So far as where to place outlets, everybody for some reason places ONE OUTLET every 6 feet! And that does not work these days!

Look around your house and you will probably see 4 things which need to be plugged in at one location. Or elsewhere maybe 6 things need to be plugged in. Yet there is only ONE OUTLET!

Or maybe you need to plug a vacuum cleaner in to vacuum a hallway - and there is no outlet there.

My thinking is to first figure out what all will be located where. All the various gizmos and electronic things which need to be plugged in. Then of course place an outlet every 6 foot or whatever is required, but also install 4 outlets in a certain spot if that will be needed. Or 6 outlets in a spot if needed.

Then businesses will place lighting circuits on separate circuits. Then if an outlet trips a breaker, you still have lights. I like that idea.

Also add up the watts or amps all the various gizmos will need. You might want to install separate circuits for power hogs or in areas where a lot of things are plugged in and the combined amperage is quite a bit.

Or maybe a separate 20 amp circuit for a space heater or window air conditioner. Vacuum cleaners are power hogs too.

Good multiple outlet locations...
-Either side of bed.
-By "kings" La-Z-Boy in living room.
-Computer location.
-TV Stereo location.
-Where you will be recharging cell phones.
Etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
makes sense- i will look into the code here to see if i can run from 1 subpanel to another subpanel.....
thanks!
 

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Your bathroom will need it's own dedicated 20 amp circuit with GFCI protection.
Also the NEC only requires receptacles to be spaced a minimum of every 12 feet, any wall section 2 feet or wider also needs a receptacle. You can always have more if you want.
Your lighting circuits will need to be protected by arc-fault breakers.
 

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Your bathroom will need it's own dedicated 20 amp circuit with GFCI protection.
Also the NEC only requires receptacles to be spaced a minimum of every 12 feet, any wall section 2 feet or wider also needs a receptacle. You can always have more if you want.
Your lighting circuits will need to be protected by arc-fault breakers.
1. There needs to be a receptacle within 6 feet of any opening, such as a door, and also within 6 feet on any other break in the wall space, such as a fireplace or what not, in addition to the 12 foot spacing.

2. All bedroom, living room and certain other area's 120 volt 15 and 20 amp circuits- lights, receptacles, smokes, etc- require AFCI protection.
 

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