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Discussion Starter #1
Plumber came by charged $70 to give me an estimate to add a pressure regulator that was sitting at 80psi.

To install the regulator, they want almost $500 (475). They have to cut out a 15” square area in the panel, and install the device inline to a 3/4” pipe.

He said I could it it myself if I wanted. i am happy to do it myself.

There are many pressure regulators.
Some have threaded ends and others have threaded to female, where the pipe tightens but why?

If they make a sharkbite fitting that would fit this new project will be a snap.

Here is the product in Amazon.


https://www.amazon.com/Zurn-Wilkins...efRID=P2GGF9MBD6774D7155E9&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Any ideas and advice?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
OUTSTANDING! On the sharkbite website there is a 3/4” prv with and without a metal top. Does it make a difference? I have a pressure gauge downstream from where i will install this prv... i just turn the screw on the prv to dial in my water pressure- right?

Thank you so much for your help!
 

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If you install this make sure you install a expansion tank on your hot water tank cold.
PRV tend to cause the hot water tank T&P valve to drip.
 

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You'll probably want to cut out that drywall and look closely at what you have and the room....so you don't have any surprises.

You may want a union type make-up, a compression make-up or a sharkbite make-up depending on the room you have, sweating capability, and availability of PRV's available. I'm not sure there are compression make-ups for PRVs.

You may want to find a nice removable access plate for your sheetrock repair before you cut it.

Good luck
 

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Remodel and New Build GC
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You'll probably want to cut out that drywall and look closely at what you have and the room....so you don't have any surprises.

You may want a union type make-up, a compression make-up or a sharkbite make-up depending on the room you have, sweating capability, and availability of PRV's available. I'm not sure there are compression make-ups for PRVs.

You may want a sharkbite slip coupling to make it up eassier.

You may want to find a nice removable access plate for your sheetrock repair before you cut it.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi everyone. So i have everything i need for the project tobegin. Got the sharkbite PRV, and now just want to settle on location. Plumber settled on the wall placement but he same pipe runs across the false ceiling. Does it matter where it goes as long as it is after the main cutoff before the branches? Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
AS long as it is on the house feed. Most folks leave irrigation on the high pressure side keep that in mind.
The image shows details the project layout. The main water comes in at grade and runs up the wall overhead to the laundry room, water heater and so on.

The red box is where the plumber wanted to install this thing that involves cutting out a section of panel.

The yellow box in the false ceiling has easy access to the 3/4” water supply.

The branch to the left goes to the front hose bib, so that could be unregulated water.

The only down side to a ceiling install is the PRV would be hidden unless i had signage everywhere.

Any ideas?🤔

Thanks in advance
 

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Doesn't look like you have any other choice. looks like a finished basement and your options are limited. Either option would work.


I like your plumber's idea is best, you can always dress that up with a nice looking access panel and you would have easy access to it. Just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
The plumbers location would be problematic because the initial vertical pipe is pretty much unmovable. To install the sharkbite PRV, I will need to cut the pipe and spread it apart, unless I cut it, install the PRV, and then sleeve it, rejoin. Lotsa cuts.

The ceiling location has more room to spread the cut pipe apart and rejoin at the PRV. I think sharkbite also makes a union that makes this sort of thing easy to do..

Had to edit this post....it is called a slip coupling and it is exactly what I need.

https://www.sharkbite.com/products/brass-push-slip-coupling



Still at drawing board...
 

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I agree with you, I see your point now. The suspended ceiling area is your best option it will give you the room to work.

Another option would be to just leave it alone. Imo, 80 psi is high but not severely dangerous. However, a prv is recommended once you get into that range.

To compensate you can turn down the water pressure on your individual supply lines feeding your fixtures like toilet, sinks, washing machine etc. This will help but not a substitute for a prv. Just a suggestion.

As mentioned in post 5, if you don't already have an xpansion tank on your water heater make sure you install one. It goes on the incoming cold water line to water heater.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Our water pressure was behaving when the plumber was here. It spikes to 100-110 and slightly higher when all hell breaks loose at all hours. The noise is quite annoying when it happens. Do you see any drawback for putting it there in the ceiling?

I hope I don't have to use that slip coupler which will require more cuts... Am I approaching this thing right with the slip coupler contingency if I cannot spread the pipes apart? I am also concerned about stressing the adjacent joints spreading them to fit the PRV. Nothing is a simple DIY.

I agree with you, I see your point now. The suspended ceiling area is your best option it will give you the room to work.

Another option would be to just leave it alone. Imo, 80 psi is high but not severely dangerous. However, a prv is recommended once you get into that range.

To compensate you can turn down the water pressure on your individual supply lines feeding your all your fixtures like toilet, sinks, washing machine etc. This will help them last longer but not a substitute for a prv. Just a suggestion.

As mentioned in post 5, if you don't already have an xpansion tank on your water heater make sure you install one. It goes on the incoming cold water line to water heater.
 

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Removal of the panels of the dropped ceiling should provide you access to the clamps (or nails) securing the pipe to the floor joist. How far apart the pipe will move after cutting will depend on the size holes the plumber drilled in the floor above. Plumbers usually drill big holes.

Since the basement was probably finished after the initial build, the incoming pipe is probably secured to the concreted basement wall and will not move apart. The hole where the pipe goes up thru the floor may allow a small amount of movement. The top plates of the basement wall were probably notched around the pipes.
You should be able to confirm these statements thru the existing hole in the wall panel and by removing the ceiling panels.

Assuming the piping goes up thru the first floor you may be able to increase the amount of movement by enlarging that hole (later sealed with foam).
Remove the ceiling panels and remove any clamps securing the pipe to the joist. The PRV will require space between the joist and the pipe to install.
Read instructions for the amount of space between ends of pipe for installation. If not provided, and assuming that there is no lateral movement in the pipe, insert a short piece of 3/4" copper pipe in one end of the PRV and mark it. Remove the short piece of pipe from the PRV (you will need the Sharkbite removal tool). Measure the distance between the mark and the end of the pipe. Double that measurement and add 1/2". Subtract that amount from the total length of the PRV. That will be the amount of pipe you will need to remove using a mini tubing cutter.

Install the PRV on one end of the pipe. Install horizontally with base of the PRV against the floor joist. Pull both pieces of pipe away from the floor joist and downward (that will temporarily increase the distance between the two) and insert the other piece of pipe in the PRV.
Using small wooden shims and the clamps removed earlier to secure the pipe to the floor joist.
 

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80 lbs pressure is considered a legal water pressure under IPC.



But if you have to have one install it in the ceiling so you have easy access.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
...............................
That was an access panel I cut out YEARS ago with a piece of ancient insulation sticking out.

IT IS AMAZING to see what they did back in 1956 when this house was built. The entire main supply line coming across the ceiling is NOT attached to anything WHATSOEVER, clear across to the other side of the house. It is just supported by the copper pipes. At one point halfway across the house it is resting on a 1/8" strap between the joist. I will certainly anchor everything once I finish this thing.
 
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