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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, all.

The range/microwave from the early 80s in my kitchen need replacing. It is actually a single unit. The wall only has the big 3 prong plug for the range. Can I add an outlet above for the microwave by getting the power from the big plug? Should I just hire an electrician to come do it? I hate hiring simple jobs out.

Thanks a bunch!

-C
 

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You cannot tap into your stove recepticle to power a micro wave or anything else.The microwave should be on it's own dedicated circuit.
 

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Know enough to get you into trouble

That big plug has a big wire with a big breaker and twice as much voltage and many times the amps as you are looking for. You could literally kill yourself here. If you were going to make this plug without running a new 20 amp circuit. That means 12 gauge wire. It is supposed to be on its own circuit. Look to grab the power from the clothes washer (not dryer), garbage disposal, or kitchen outlet.

Do you have a fan above the stove? If you do it has power that you could wire into a plug. All in all I'd try to send you to an electrician. You are also buying peace of mind and sleeping safely at night.
 

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You may be able to get power from a 20A garbage disposal circuit, but you cannot use the countertop circuits. A fan circuit is likely 15A, therefore no good. Definitely not from the range circuit.
 

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The new microwave needs a dedicated circuit now
Unsafe & againt code to tap into the range 240v outlet
Laundry area requires a dedicated circuit, you can't add on to that - against code
---Washers can pull well over 7a, every time you do laundry & use the microwave thebreaker will trip
Kitchen counters require (2) dedicated circuits - you can't pull power from there either
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There is no fan above the range, no go there.

The range is on the opposite wall of garbage disposal, no go there.

There is a wall plug about 2 ft right, 3 ft down, maybe a go? Does this mean drywall removal/replacing?

I would rather not die doing it if at all possible.

Thanks again for all the help,

-C
 

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You need a new dedicated circuit for the microwave
This means you need to run 12/2 wire from your electrical panel to the microwave and install a 20 Amp breaker. This will likely involve patching drywall, but not necessarily. Where is your electrical panel?

If you're not experienced with doing work in the panel, sounds like time to call an electrician.
 

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Hello, all.

Should I just hire an electrician to come do it? I hate hiring simple jobs out.

Thanks a bunch!

-C
This is not necessarily a simple job depending on how far to your panel. Electricians have many more ways than diyers for fishing walls without damage. I think you might need one.:thumbsup:
 

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code vs diy workable

It is true that code requires this to be on it's own 20 amp circut but we all know that it is possible to run a microwave on a 15 amp circut if there isn't too much else on it. If all you have are a few lamps and maybe a tv on a circut it can easily power a microwave safely. I assumed since this was a diy forum with people who want to try it themselves they just wanted a workable solution. this is different if you live in the house you are trying to burn down than if you work on someone elses house.

It isn't hard to get a line (12 gauge wire) from the breaker box to your area. No splices this is one piece of wire. The wire will be stapled to wood so follow the trusses. If there isn't a piece of wood bridging across the trusses then you will want to put one in. Think what would happen if a person accidentally stepped on it. It runs through the attic and down or under the house and up into the bay behind the future micro. If you pulled the wire (leave lots of slack and don't cut the end off) then called an electrician to make the connection to the box and wire the plug in the wall then you are probably under $250 for the job Ask for a per hour rate for a journeyman and a helper. The helper attaches the wire in the attic and the journeyman makes the connections. I typically pay 55/hr for a journeyman and 45/ hr for a helper

The electrician can cut the wall open where they need to by the pannel. You will have a drywall repair or an access cover over this area. go to a box store and figure out what you are comfortable with. I'd also let the electrician cut the box in for the micro. It is easy to do with the right tools and they can drill through the top plate easily and pull the wire into the wall cavity. This is why you will want 10 ft of slack at the point where it goes into the wall.

you have measured from the bottom of your new microwave to the range top haven't you?

Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well this is no-bueno.

Two story house, so no attic to run the line. Concrete foundation, so can't go underneath. My breaker box is in the garage, across a hallway and about 8 feet from where the plug would need to be. I don't see how we could give the microwave its own dedicated circuit breaker without it becoming a major project.

Thoughts??

I think Mark is still waiting on that NEC code which makes the independent breaker a requirement.
 

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Sazall option

You can put a wire anywhere with a sazall, big drill, and utter disreguard for drywall. I supect you'll be learning to make some patches.

If you put wire close to the surface put a metal protector over it so the next time that someone puts a nail or screw into the wall they don't shock themselves.

I had an electrician run wire and put the protective plates over the studs where he passed through. The HO came back later and was cussing the electrician because he couldn't put a screw into that place. I told him that sparky had just saved his bacon and the plates worked great!
 

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Half the posts seems to have disappeared from this thread. Still waiting for code reference for dedicated (individual) branch circuit (other than the requirement to follow manufacturers instructions).

I understand this is a DIY forum and I'm a bit out of place, but I hang around here to try to make sure people have accurate information.

BTW, IF it needed an individual branch circuit, you cannot use a duplex receptacle (it counts as two outlets) and an individual branch circuit can only have one outlet. You need to use a single 20A outlet.

Mark
 

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It doesn't necessarily need to have a dedicated circuit but, if it's shared with other loads, it can't exceed 50% of the circuit rating. 210.23
 

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It doesn't necessarily need to have a dedicated circuit but, if it's shared with other loads, it can't exceed 50% of the circuit rating. 210.23
Now that I agree with - and in a lot of cases this would push towards a dedicated microwave circuit. There are still cases (such as a microwave and small disposal) where they can be on the same circuit.


This is common when planning kitchens, that you need the manufacturers instructions and appliance ratings to plan the branch circuits for microwave, disposal, dishwasher, range hood, etc.

Mark
 

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This site sure has some fine electricians---good advice.

I will say this--some of the new microwave draw a lot of amps--much more than earlier models .

Several times I've installed new units--only to have them overload a circuit that was adequate for the older one that it replaced.
 

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It doesn't necessarily need to have a dedicated circuit but, if it's shared with other loads, it can't exceed 50% of the circuit rating. 210.23
I should have mentioned that if all the loads are fastened in place, the 50% rule doesn't apply.
 
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