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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am adding an inground pool to my yard. I want to install a 100 amp sb panel to my existing 200 amp main, about 50 ft away to be closer to the pump and lighting location. I also want to include a separate outlet. My pool contractor is requesting (2) 2-pole 20 amp GFCI and (1) 1-pole 10 amp GFCI breakers.

My questions are- do I really need the 100 amp sub, and what size wiring/conduit should i use from the main to the sub panel? Also, I haven't had any luck finding 1-pole 10A GFCIs- any suggestions? I would like to get as much of the stuff together as possible before I have an electrician come in.

Thanks,

Brian
 

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Probably not unless you plan on utilizing more circuits for different applications. Only you can determine that. But it certainly won't hurt if the need ever arises since you will have it available
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I agree with ^^

Also, there are NUMEROUS specific codes that must be satisfied when wiring a pool. Just by the very nature of water and electricity, I think the pool wiring and any associated grounding/bonding would be best left to an expert.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree with ^^

Also, there are NUMEROUS specific codes that must be satisfied when wiring a pool. Just by the very nature of water and electricity, I think the pool wiring and any associated grounding/bonding would be best left to an expert.
I realize It is a good idea to leave it to a pro to wire a pool. I just want to run a sub panel to the area the pump will be, not wire the whole pool. The pool will be wired by the pool electrician, but I have to provide a box for him to wire into. Thanks so far for the help...
 

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To properly size the panel you would need to know the sizes of the pumps and how much they draw.

You will not find 10 amp breakers for your usage. That size would be used in a different style panel, but would not be GFI.
 

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When we had our pool put in in 1995 the electrician added one 20A 220V breaker for the main pump, Polaris pump, and gas heater ignition, and one 20A 120V breaker for the pool light and general conveneince. Breakers were not GFI, but the pool light was wired through the GFI convenience outlet on the timer post. Pool light nacelle is bonded to a ground stake under teh diving board, and the ground is then attached to a metal part of the pool and then to the heater, pump, and Polaris pump, before returning to the ground bar at the panel.
 

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When we had our pool put in in 1995 the electrician added one 20A 220V breaker for the main pump, Polaris pump, and gas heater ignition, and one 20A 120V breaker for the pool light and general conveneince. Breakers were not GFI, but the pool light was wired through the GFI convenience outlet on the timer post. Pool light nacelle is bonded to a ground stake under teh diving board, and the ground is then attached to a metal part of the pool and then to the heater, pump, and Polaris pump, before returning to the ground bar at the panel.
This is nice, but what does it have to do with the OP's situation???
Also, the "ground stake" is worthless and not required with regard to pool bonding. Many guys who are not very familiar with pool wiring install ground rods thinking they are somehow required, which they are not.
 

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Hello all,

I am adding an inground pool to my yard. I want to install a 100 amp sb panel to my existing 200 amp main, about 50 ft away to be closer to the pump and lighting location. I also want to include a separate outlet. My pool contractor is requesting (2) 2-pole 20 amp GFCI and (1) 1-pole 10 amp GFCI breakers.

My questions are- do I really need the 100 amp sub, and what size wiring/conduit should i use from the main to the sub panel? Also, I haven't had any luck finding 1-pole 10A GFCIs- any suggestions? I would like to get as much of the stuff together as possible before I have an electrician come in.

Thanks,

Brian
No, you do not need a 100A feeder to the sub-panel. Typically, a 100A panel is all you will find and is fine to use, but a 50A feeder to it is more than adequate, UNLESS you will be adding an electric heat pump pool heater or some other high draw load.

There are many codes involved as has been stated though. This panel MUST be run in conduit all the way from the main, with four insulated feeder wires, including the ground. Depending on where it will be located a grounding electrode (or two) may also be required.
 
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