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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I working on a basement floor laundry room, removing the existing hookups upstairs and installing new down. I'm considering a self level. Money is tight right now but I want to do it right.
The previous owners had parkay tile down glued to the slab. When I removed it left a bit of the paper backing and there's a lot of adhesive. I think I know the answer but does this all have to be scraped off and what's the easiest way of doing? I'm thinking grinding brushes or wheels will gum up fast and hand scraping is not an option. Are there any solvents that won't curl nose hairs?
If grinding, any suggestions on wheels? Should I just go to town? I'm right next to the furnace and water heater and its an open area with finished living space so being (somewhat) clean is a factor. I'll take some better pics but this is what I have now.
There is carpet laid in the foreground and I was thinking leaving the concrete or maybe laying tile if I can find something at a good price.



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try a heat gun and hand scraper, that should soften up the adhesive enough to get most of it up, from the pics so far you should be fine after getting the larger clumps off to use thinset and retile with ceramic tile..
 

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not so noob
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Discussion Starter #4
Here's a better shot of the floor. Sort of.
Also shot of the uncovered main clean out. It was nailed and floored over.
Unfortunately right where the corner of the washer will sit so I'm going to have to adjust my layout slightly.





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Discussion Starter #5
I should be able to add a dryer box, and then have the dryer up against the wall? Say 1" space behind...I initially wasn't going to cut out the drywall but now I'm thinking it's probably best to do so. Should the dryer duct be insulated in the wall as it goes up and out ? I'll be using rigid galvanized.


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Personally I would go get some the interlocking floor mats that you see used around weight equipment, and that way it gets rid of two issues. First is not having to deal with the ugly floor. Second is that it will cut down on the sound from the equipment and still give you easy access to the backflow preventor in that box.

http://www.amazon.com/CAP-Barbell-I...1453973042&sr=8-5&keywords=rubber+floor+tread

The other would use what we did in front of our washer and dryer downstairs. We got a huge roll of left over Rubber tread mat from my wife's work. You can use this and just lay it down. If you get a backup or have water issues, you can roll it up and take it outside to hose off and then dry. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=2079475242&pf_rd_i=desktop
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm thinking more along the lines of coating, like the aggregate or something slightly decorative. There's not a huge amount of glue on the floor, and I figure since its glued one rough, a coating would adhere fine. It would suck, however, if it didn't.
I don't mind the rollouts or PVC or rubber but not sure if the wife is keen.
Is there much off gassing from the rubber flooring? I had some and it reeks...but...it was from Princess Auto haa




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No there is not. It is better on the feet if you are like me and walk around the house with socks on.

Ours is not glued down, in case the floor gets wet.

It is a quick and easy fix for right now to hide the ugly.

It is a utility space anyways. It is not supposed to look pretty if downstairs. Plus side is that thicker style mat would cut down on the machine noise, since the machines are not sitting on hard concrete.
 
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