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rookie
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I recently bought a lg dryer and would like to know if it is possible to add the dryer receptacle to a service panel that has the ground and common bonded? My service panel is located in the house where the dryer will also be located. My main service is located on the side of my garage which is a separate building from the house and there are three wires that come up through the service panel in the house.

thanks nicole

Let me rephrase Do I need to add the 4 wire plug along with receptacle or 3 wire. This will be a new circuit and as I mentioned befor the service panel is bonded (common&ground).
 

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Super Moderator
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All main panels have the neutral and ground bonded. That is normal.
You must use a four wire feed and four prong plug.
 

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Banned
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If the existing wiring is 3-wire (two hots, Neutral), you do not need to change over the wiring for the new dryer. If there is no existing wiring for the dryer, you need to pull 10/3.
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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I recently bought a lg dryer and would like to know if it is possible to add the dryer receptacle to a service panel that has the ground and common bonded? My service panel is located in the house where the dryer will also be located. My main service is located on the side of my garage which is a separate building from the house and there are three wires that come up through the service panel in the house.

thanks nicole

Let me rephrase Do I need to add the 4 wire plug along with receptacle or 3 wire. This will be a new circuit and as I mentioned befor the service panel is bonded (common&ground).
Since this will be a new circuit, the cable has to contain two ungrounded, one neutral and one equipment grounding conductor. 10/3 non-metallic sheathed cable or 8/3 SER aluminum cable will work. Receptacles are available either surface mount or flush mount. A flush mount receptacle will require a seperate box. The surface mount does not need a box. You will need a 30A/240 breaker for your panel. The white and bare conductors can both be terminated on the ground/neutral bar. Just make sure each conductor is terminated under its' own screw.

This is a surface mount receptacle;



This is a flush mount receptacle;



Use a two gang box if you choose the flush mount device.

Good luck!! Merry Christmas!!
 

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rookie
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
so what will it be fellas, three wire or four?


Since this will be a new circuit, the cable has to contain two ungrounded, one neutral and one equipment grounding conductor. 10/3 non-metallic sheathed cable or 8/3 SER aluminum cable will work. Receptacles are available either surface mount or flush mount. A flush mount receptacle will require a seperate box. The surface mount does not need a box. You will need a 30A/240 breaker for your panel. The white and bare conductors can both be terminated on the ground/neutral bar. Just make sure each conductor is terminated under its' own screw.

This is a surface mount receptacle;



This is a flush mount receptacle;



Use a two gang box if you choose the flush mount device.

Good luck!! Merry Christmas!!
 

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Super Moderator
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New installations are required to be 4 wires. Both those receptacles shown are 4 wire.

Your description of your service is confusing. You only have one service. Either it is on the garage or the house. It should not be in both locations. Where is your meter located? The panel closest to the meter would be your service panel.
 

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Registered
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350 Posts
Four.

10/3 cable contains 4 conductors. The "3" only calls out the current carrying wires, the ground is understood.

Was that what was confusing you?
 

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rookie
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
my meter is located on the side of the garage which is a separate building about fifty feet away from the house and in that box there are two screw in fuses.:detective:


New installations are required to be 4 wires. Both those receptacles shown are 4 wire.

Your description of your service is confusing. You only have one service. Either it is on the garage or the house. It should not be in both locations. Where is your meter located? The panel closest to the meter would be your service panel.
 

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rookie
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
when i purchased the plug and receptacle at home depot she gave me the three wire dryer plug and said its universal, what ever the hell that means. Not really confused just listening to everyone. My manual that came with the dryer gives instructions with a three wire power cord or four wire but in every instance there is a warning that grounding through the neutral conductor is prohibited for new branch-circuit installations. Im running a new circuit.
 

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rookie
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Four.

10/3 cable contains 4 conductors. The "3" only calls out the current carrying wires, the ground is understood.

Was that what was confusing you?
__________________
#1 - If you don't know what you're doing - get a licensed electrician!
#2 - If you follow my advice and something bad happens see # 1
Electricity bites hard, and it could be the last thing you feel... Good Luck!




thanks for the advice I'm pretty confident that I can wing it. About four years ago I wired my first house by myself minus a dryer. The dryer was already wired in a separate garage.
 

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Super Moderator
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When you install the 4 wire cord you will need to remove a bond strap inside the dryer near the wiring terminals. Your instructions should tell you how to do this.
 

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The person at Home Depot is clueless.

Say you are replacing an existing dryer. It used to be code to run 3 wires and have a 3 hole outlet on the wall.

Over time problems including shocks, overloads, and even fires were traced back to this 3 conductor wiring.

However, recognizing that to require a homeowner to spends hundreds of dollars to upgrade their wiring just to replace a dryer would be an extreme burden, a grandfather clause was inserted in the code.

So, if you are replacing an existing dryer and there is already a 3 wire plug there, you are allowed to use it.

In all new construction or any case where a new circuit has to be run and a new plug installed, you MUST use a 4 wire cable and outlet.

This is to protect you, your property, and anyone who uses the appliance.
 
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Registered
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350 Posts
250.140 Frames of Ranges and Clothes Dryers. Frames
of electric ranges, wall-mounted ovens, counter-mounted
cooking units, clothes dryers, and outlet or junction boxes
that are part of the circuit for these appliances shall be
connected to the equipment grounding conductor in the
manner specified by 250.134 or 250.138.

Exception: For existing branch-circuit installations only
where an equipment grounding conductor is not present in
the outlet or junction box, the frames of electric ranges,
wall-mounted ovens, counter-mounted cooking units,
clothes dryers, and outlet or junction boxes that are part of
the circuit for these appliances shall be permitted to be
connected to the grounded circuit conductor if all the fol-
lowing conditions are met.

(1) The supply circuit is 120/240-volt, single-phase, 3-wire;
or 208Y/120-volt derived from a 3-phase, 4-wire, wye-
connected system.

(2) The grounded conductor is not smaller than 10 AWG
copper or 8 AWG aluminum.

(3) The grounded conductor is insulated, or the grounded
conductor is uninsulated and part of a Type SE service-
entrance cable and the branch circuit originates at the
service equipment.

(4) Grounding contacts of receptacles furnished as part of
the equipment are bonded to the equipment.
 

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Banned
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Getting electrical advice from Home Depot is like getting medical advice at Walgreens.
Actually not, since those in Walgreens are licensed professionals, and some have Physician Assistants on staff, or Nurses. Pharmacists have to go through the same schooling as doctors, but even more.

Actually getting electrical advice at Home Depot, is like asking the kid flipping burgers at Micky D's or BK, what they think of that mole on your neck.
 

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rookie
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15 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Does anyone know how high up from the floor I can go with a flush mounted receptacle box? I'm stacking the dryer on top of the washer. Another question, can the air duct for the dryer go in the wall and straight up to the roof if I am stacking the pair?
 

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Special User
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Does anyone know how high up from the floor I can go with a flush mounted receptacle box?
There's no height restriction that I'm aware of, though the receptacle does need to be "accessible", so, I'd say 6' or less from the finished floor would be reasonable.

Another question, can the air duct for the dryer go in the wall and straight up to the roof if I am stacking the pair?
This has been done, but I recommend it only as a last resort if your laundry room is in the middle of a house and a horizontal run to an exterior wall is just too far. Vertical ducts don't clear lint well, and require diligent cleaning.

If there is any way to go down into a basement or crawl, or even just horizontally to a nearby exterior wall, that would be much, much better.
 

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Super Moderator
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The shorter and straighter you can make the duct run the better.
 
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