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Hi, my general contractor did not use the treated woods for contacting the concrete in my house. Now completely uninstall the whole thing (part of patiodoor) will cost me a lot. I heard that I can use ACQ chemical to treat that piece of wood on spot (or in situ). Does anyone know where I can buy the acq chemical?

thanks in advance.

PatioDoor
 

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Any wood touching concrete should be treated, but it does not have to ACQ. There are after market treatments, but they don't work as well. Check lumberyards and home stores. I know big box stores carry something that should help. Cuprinol, if still available, is a good one.
 

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Actually as long as there is separation between the wood and the concrete (exp. 15# felt) and the application is interior (like basement) the lumber does not have to be treated. There are many kinds of treated lumber available and to the untrained eye some may not look as though they are treated (the green look traditionally associated with cca and acq). You may want to call your contractor and ask if they used a treated board or not. The various treatments are as follows: ammoniacal copper quaternary, alkaline copper quaternary, copper azole, dispersed copper azole, micronized copper azole, micronized copper quaternary, dcoi & imidacloprid (not sure if this is any safer than cca), propiconazole-tebuconazole-imidacloprid (again not sure if this is any safer than cca). Also the following is still available for certain uses to contractors: chromated copper arsenate, ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate.

I would advise using a mask when cutting the boards with imidacloprid as this is essentially a nerve agent. It is a primary ingriedient in termiticides and pesticides.

Brush on treatments such as jasco termin-8, timbor, or wolman's coppercoat will only give you surface protection. You should primarily use these products for treating the cuts. Treated wood has the liquid preservative forced into it under high pressure (though on large pieces it may not fully penetrate which is why you should treat the cuts). When using brush on treatments make sure to wear neoprene gloves, longsleeves, and goggles.
 

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As ARI001 stated, you can buy treatments to apply to cut ends and edges of treated wood where the material can be reasonably absorbed. However, as he accurately stated you cannot treat the lumber yourself with such aftermarket chemicals. No chance.

Although there are a number of treated materials that are classified as AWPA C2 waterborne treatments, the VAST majority of the treated material on the current market is ACQ. Most of the other treatments that were mentioned will in fact appear treated, and most can be easily identified by a trained eye if the lumber is in new condition.
 

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Go to permachink website. They sell preservatives for log homes and should have something that will work for this. Also I have used copper - brown wood preservative by Jasco that I bought at Lowes. good luck
 
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