DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Pro Answers
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Carrier air handler FB4ANF030 1997.
Upon an emergency call of a backed up condensation line. * 5 gallons water in the auxiliary pan.
Any HVAC tech seen this:

Besides the wrong pitch in the condensation line, improper P-trap, algae galore, I noticed two holes in the following prim drain pan- condensation line connection ports-link to picture: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2K6fFo26qZuSXBLdTVtN2phU0k
Never saw this before- they looked machined not done intentionally.

Seems this would throw off static pressure if they were not plugged and one of the reasons water was going into the aux. pan even though aux (secondary) inlet was capped off.

Cheers Prof. J. HVAC tech/Inspector
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
42,492 Posts
Common on Carrier coils. Helps to prevent the duct work from becoming soaked when the secondary drain isn't piped.

The holes aren't big enough to throw off static or air flow.
 

·
Pro Answers
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting.
I just worked on a carrier air handler last week FX4 didn't notice . I have NEVER seen them on Tempstar, Lennox or Trane. Then again, I am not looking for these holes- until I am in the frameset of finding what is causing a backup or checking prime drain pan for cracks and leaks.

If one were to plug the holes up with some HVAC silicone and then establish a secondary switch like a ss2 rectorseal condesnation switch this seems more logical then allowing these two hole to drain and fill up an aux pan with gallons of water. I am firm believer if you wait for the aux pan to tell you that you have a clog or a back up its usually too late and your dealing with a mess and maybe $1,000 of damage.
Seems a set up for a flawed design by carrier or any HVAC manufacture using it.

* Keep in mind were dealing with a prime drain condensation line that needs a proper pitched line- less 90 turns, and a proper PTRAP.



There seems to be more logic having the unit shut off before aux pan fills up.

In content this is typical air handler placement in FL- which I disagree with on design. 21st century still see new building HVAC's in closets and in attics.

Most clients don't want to check there aux pan in the attic as routine maintenance.
Always recommend to the client your first line defense is the primart switch condensation line, then secondary switch condensation line then the second line of defense is the float switch on the aux pan.

Too many float pan switches fail and I have seen them knocked off /corroded etc.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
42,492 Posts
Use a wet switch in the pan. The switch will shut down the unit before there is a 1/16" of water in the pan.

I've seen those weep holes caulked over already. Doesn't hurt system operation.

An SS2 or easy trap with float switch are always nice safeties to have. But neither protect a home from a cracked drain pan. So a wet switch or float switch should still be in the secondary pan.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top