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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read that it's best to wet a new brush before using it. How dry do you want it to be before you actually start to paint with it?

Also, a related question on cleaning a brush. I planned on using the same brushes for my colors (one a light green/blue color and then white). I've done the cut-in work with the brushes in the green/blue and I'm ready to start the white paint. I won't have a problem with the color using white paint if I clean the brush well (using some tips from this forum), right? Also, how long to dry between different colors of paint?
 

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Painting Company, NY
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The reason to wet it first is to prevent the paint to wick up into the heel which makes it more difficult to clean. It works well.
What's the heel of a brush? We are talking about paint brushes and not shoes. You don't have to wet a brush before using it. If you are using a quality paint brush paint will not be absorbed up into the FERRUL, you should only be putting the bristles into the paint a little bit anyways. If you did wet your brush prior you need to spin it, spin the water out by using a brush spinner which is a waste, because you can do a better job by hand. You don't want the brush soaking wet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you!

~

I read a very long thread on this forum, titled Behr Paint, last night. Today I returned the unopened, untinted can and went to my Sherwin Williams store. Thanks!
 

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Too Short? Cut it Again!
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You really do not need to but it sure will not hurt to slightly dampen it. I would pick up one of these at the paint store and after cleaning use it and your done, just wrap it back in the sleeve it came in.
Hey Chris. Learn something everyday? I have never seen this tool. What is it?
 

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paper hanger and painter
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Hey Chris. Learn something everyday? I have never seen this tool. What is it?

You can either spin out your roller sleeves and or brushes. I have had the same one for probably 20 years and when I am working it gets used daily, don't know how you can live without one, despite what Mr housepainter says,I don't know how you spin out a sleeve by hand.My local MM store always had them in stock ,I am sure SW and others would also.

http://paint-and-supplies.hardwares...er-tools/brush-and-roller-cleaner-140467.aspx
 

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"Beam me up, Scottie"
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You can either spin out your roller sleeves and or brushes. I have had the same one for probably 20 years and when I am working it gets used daily, don't know how you can live without one,
despite what Mr housepainter says,
I don't know how you spin out a sleeve by hand.My local MM store always had them in stock ,I am sure SW and others would also.

http://paint-and-supplies.hardwares...er-tools/brush-and-roller-cleaner-140467.aspx
HMMM!! I would say 99% of the painters I know own one of these. I guess if you buy throw away sleeves you don't need one. Mine is 20 something years old also. I oil mine quite a bit which keeps it running smooth. Anyway, standard issue item for most painters around here.

Kevin
 

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Painting Company, NY
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I have tried the brush/sleeve spinner before, found it just as efficient to spin by hand, it's just my personal preference. We buy roller sleeves by the case in bulk as we do with most of our supplies, so we rarely wash one out, if we are on a large project where you will be using the same color for days or weeks then we would save the sleeve in a five with paint in it or if its an 18inch sleeve then load it up with paint and wrap it with plastic well.
 

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I had a spinner a few years ago. Lost it and never replaced it. I meant to sometimes, jsut never seems to be a priority. I will spin my brushes between my palms when I wet them and when I wash them. Then sometimes, I will sling the water out before using the brush comb (sometimes).
 

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I had a spinner over last night.... hardy har har! Sorry, bad joke.

Those spinners are nice, but you can save the money by spinning the brushes in the palm of your hands kind of like how Ralph Macchio from Karate Kid 2 used the spinning drum, except have the bristles facing downward inside the sink basin. Though the spinner might do a more thorough job, I've never really had a problem painting right after ringing out a brush like that. If you plan on washing a roller cover and using it again, then I'd definitely recommend getting a spinner for that purpose.

Also, I'd consider getting a 5-in-1 tool for both cleaning the brush and the roller. You can get most of the paint off of the roller with the rounded side of the 5-in-1 by scraping it downward back into the can.
 
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