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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

We have an existing 6’ wood fence with 4x4” posts all rotting away and needs to be replaced. It is straight and about 100’ long. Our neighbors have agreed to pay half for a similar replacement fence. However, we would like to pay the difference to have the new fence be 8’ tall, and the neighbors are ok with this. (I understand this is too tall to meet code and worst case we would have to cut off 2’ if some other neighbor complained.)

The fence posts are currently on “our side” and we are fine with that. For durability, we would like to go with metal posts, use standard 6’ wood slats and add a 2’ of lattice on top of that (built in a 2x4 frame for stability).

In addition, we do not want to see the fence/posts (over time), so we want to plant a Ivy (or some climbing vine) on or side, but rather than it integrating/climbing on to the wood boards (which eventually rot and have to be replaced), the idea I had was to attach rigid cattle panels to the metal posts (like https://www.homedepot.com/p/16-ft-4-Gauge-Cattle-Panels-33150739/202820268 ), and let the Ivy grow onto it and the metal posts/cattle panels/Ivy should never have to be replaced even if the wood boards rot on the other side.

We would start with a panel from the ground up to the height of a panel, 4', then after the Ivy grows up to 4', add another 4' horizontal section, eventually covering our entire side of the fence. The panels would be attached to the outside of the posts on our side, thus creating a gap between the wood fence planks and the metal panel of about 4"?

The question is:
1) Is this a good idea to create a lasting green ‘wall’ on our side?
2) If so, would 2 3/8” metal posts work (at 8’ above ground and 3’ under?) and at what gauge to support that height/load? And would you recommend keeping the posts 8’ apart on going closer to 6’ apart?

(As far as location: I’m in northern CA, a typical sub division, lots of mature large trees around, not much, no real “unusually gusty winds” come through.)

Thanks!
 

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Being the wood may not endure those conditions well because of the moist and shade environment, have you considered omitting the wooden structure and only doing a fast growing evergreen ivy on the cattle panels? What a 2-3/8" steel post will tolerate is largely determined by wall thickness schedule. If possible to find schedule 40 I'd probably try that with the posts 8' spacing but set in concrete 2' with a 12" diameter hole and the concrete having a 10" slump. Cap the posts.
 

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retired framer
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All that sounds like a lot of weight and wind I would would go with 6x6 posts.
1/3 of a fence post should be in the ground so 8 ft high = 12 ft posts. Protect the post at the ground to stop the rot.
 

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When in south Florida, I had a large inground pool and had to have a fence.


Wanting something more than the 4' required, I went with a 6' chain link, mounted to 9' steel posts, and had wire stretched between the post, above the chain link.


Planted a lot of English Ivy, and within two years, I had a 9' privacy fence that passed code.




Neighbors loved it, and I had a great private retreat. :vs_cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses everyone…

SeniorSitizen: The only wood in the build is the 6’ planks and top lattice. The wood is to create instant privacy that is needed by both parties. Thanks for the post install details.

Nealtw: You suggest 6x6 posts; but then recommend addressing post rot, so that is why metal posts seem to be the answer… do you know what metal post spec is equivalent or better than a 6x6 wood post?

Ktkelly: Did you install 9’ posts because that is the loophole; ‘you can have poles around your yard at any height, it is only the fence between them that is height regulated’? Do you have any pics of before/during /after?

So far we have suggested details:
- “schedule 40…posts 8' spacing but set in concrete 2' with a 12" diameter hole and the concrete having a 10" slump.”
- Anyone want to confirm suggestion?

Does anyone know of load calcs or official guidelines/specs that would show what that fence could handle weight/wind wise (how close would we be to overloading it or is this overbuilding it by a large margin)?

Thanks!
 

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retired framer
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I don't know about steel but it fails in the same place so it needs the same protection at ground level.

 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Are you set on round posts?

If not check the strength of 4" square tubing.

It will rust, unless you coat it with an inhibiter, but it will certainly take a wind storm, I have driven over a bridge made from it with an 18 wheeler loaded with logs.:devil3:

I concur , burying 1/3 of your post , so for 8' high above ground = 4' deep posts.
And you can easily offset your mesh panels with spacers to allow the wooden side air circulation to keep rot at bay, but you lose a few inches of yard on your side.


ED
 

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retired framer
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They should have built a mound of concrete about 1" high at the post, and sloped down to make water flow away.

No rusted out ground level later.


ED
That is part of it, the post needs to be HDG, but even then the chemical reaction between zinc and concrete is the zinc breaks down over time and by time it is gone it has filled all the pores in the concrete and still protects the steel. right at the surface there are no pores to plug up so the zinc just washes away and then the post will rust. Just a wrap of peel and stick saves both steel and wood.
 

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retired framer
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https://profence.com.au/installing-fence-posts-concrete/




How Do I Prepare The Posts For Concreting?

Ensure that you have chosen adequate quality steel and galvanised posts for the job.
The Australasian Wire Industry Association recommends the application of an epoxy mastic paint 100 to 200mm above and below the ground level mark on the post. This will help prevent contact with any moisture or soil build-up at the base of the post.
The bottom of the post should be situated 40mm minimum from the bottom of the concrete footer.
This concrete bed is critical to prevent contact between soil, moisture, and the bottom of the pipe. This is a sadly common fault and will severely limit the life of your posts. Equally important is doming the top of footing to eliminate water pooling.
 

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Do realize at the box stores we're dealing with a post like chain link uses that's 16 gauge and that's only about a 1/16" (0.0625") wall thickness while 2" sch 40 is 0.154" wall. I'd probably be checking out a salvage yard and stop by Ace hardware and buy some aluminum paint.:wink2:
 

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Ktkelly: Did you install 9’ posts because that is the loophole; ‘you can have poles around your yard at any height, it is only the fence between them that is height regulated’? Do you have any pics of before/during /after?



Sorry, no pics as it was several years, and another wife ago.




It was a work around as a 6' fence was the maximum, but with it being nothing buy English Ivy to anyone looking, I never heard a thing from the city, even though upon the initial inspection, I was asked why those posts were so tall (the wire wasn't on them).


I just explained "That's what they had.", and he said no more as he signed off on the permit.
 
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