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putting in a wall oven. ran 12 gage solid wire because it called out for 20 amp. got the wall oven in hand and it has 8 gage stranded coming out of the whip. i know the oven is 220 volts and 12 gage is suppose to be for 110 volts, but i could take the white neutral wire and run another 110 volts to it to make my 220 volts. but my question is will it carry the amount of volts i need to carry safetly?
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Show us a picture of the oven rating plate. #12 is not just for 120 volts, it can be used for 20 amp, 240 volt circuits. We need to know what the rating plate says for voltage and amperage. Example does it say 120/240 volts or does it say 240 volts? What does it say for amperage?
 
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Master General ReEngineer
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#12 is not just for 120 volts, it can be used for 20 amp, 240 volt circuits.
Ayuh,..... Last piece of 12/ 2 I had in my hand, said 600V right on the outer casin',....
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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Ayuh,..... Last piece of 12/ 2 I had in my hand, said 600V right on the outer casin',....
600 volts is the max voltage allowed. Not found in residential applications.

Sent from my RCT6213W22 using Tapatalk
 
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If your oven calls for 20 amps and 240 volts then the 12/2 will be fine. You can use the white wire as a hot. Tape it or colour it with a marker to indicate it is a hot wire and not a neutral.
You will need a double pole 20 amp breaker.

If your oven calls for 120/240 volts then it requires a neutral and the 12/2 will not work. You will need 12/3.
 

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While joed has answered the question
If your oven calls for 20 amps and 240 volts then the 12/2 will be fine. You can use the white wire as a hot. Tape it or colour it with a marker to indicate it is a hot wire and not a neutral.
You will need a double pole 20 amp breaker.

If your oven calls for 120/240 volts then it requires a neutral and the 12/2 will not work. You will need 12/3.
the original question does deserve further comment in that it was asked
putting in a wall oven. ran 12 gage solid wire because it called out for 20 amp. got the wall oven in hand and it has 8 gage stranded coming out of the whip. i know the oven is 220 volts and 12 gage is suppose to be for 110 volts, but i could take the white neutral wire and run another 110 volts to it to make my 220 volts. but my question is will it carry the amount of volts i need to carry safetly?
BARBIE4U stated that "12 gage is suppose to be for 110 volts", which means that this poster has no conception as to the difference between Volts and Amps.
He then asks "i could take the white neutral wire and run another 110 volts to it to make my 220 volts. but my question is will it carry the amount of volts i need to carry safetly?"

The mind boggles at this question - since he obviously does not understand, the difference between the current carrying capacity of any conductor and the quality of any insulation.
(To put his mind at rest, insulation on "domestic" conductors is usually rated at at least 600 V, no matter what is the nominal supply voltage.)
 

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Usually a single wall oven needs #10 and a double needs #8. If there is a white wire on the oven, you will need a 3 conductor + ground cable.
 

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Licensed electrician
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OP, cables size and voltages not related the way you think they are. Example, #12 can carry 20 amps at 120 or 240 volts.
 

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putting in a wall oven. ran 12 gage solid wire because it called out for 20 amp. got the wall oven in hand and it has 8 gage stranded coming out of the whip. i know the oven is 220 volts and 12 gage is suppose to be for 110 volts, but i could take the white neutral wire and run another 110 volts to it to make my 220 volts. but my question is will it carry the amount of volts i need to carry safetly?
Your understanding of electricity is so far off base, you do not need to be working with it.
This is a case of you being over your head.
 

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Your understanding of electricity is so far off base, you do not need to be working with it.
This is a case of you being over your head.

My thoughts as well; just waiting for someone else to break such news. Please hire an electrician to make your appliance hook-ups for you. It will cost more than DIY, but it will be well worth the safety.
 
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