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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm thinking, dig out under each corner and raise it with two car jacks and then force bricks and such under it to keep its position?
Thing probably weighs 1500# to 3000# so each corner would weigh 1/4th that.
Any other ideas on raising this?
 

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the Musigician
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i think it'd be best to lift it on it's long edge and redo the ground, then lay it back down. sink a couple long steel poles to lean it against while you work. then another once it's upright on the other side in the center to hold it. get a case of beer and a few friends to lift and lower.

DM
 

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the Musigician
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this is a DIY site, not a 'who do i hire?' site! lol
now come up with some good ideas! that's what makes it fun here!

DM
 

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this is a DIY site, not a 'who do i hire?' site! lol
now come up with some good ideas! that's what makes it fun here!

DM
Ok, jack it up stick some bricks under it then make arrangements to rent a jack hammer when the slab cracks. It's no fun when DIY isn't the proper way to do it.
A concrete slab needs even support to last.
 

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the Musigician
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that's what i meant 'redo the ground'. if he put bricks under it, it'd likely crack, yup. 'specially if it gets driven on.
if it has rerod in it, it'd be better.

DM
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I'm thinking now, rent jackhammer, build forms, put in rebar, buy many bags of cement.
It will be driven on and there is no easy way to provide a bed for this elevated slab.

Next question: do these elec. jack hammers have enough power to crack 6" of concrete?
The last one I rented could barely do sandstone.

Or, I could abrade or roughen or remove the top surface of the existing slab so that new concrete poured on top would be 2" to 4" thick?
 

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Lift it up! Concrete only weighs 150# per cubic foot---- 6x10x.5 = 30 x 150 = 4500# My 2001 cargo van weighs 3700#. 4000# with 100# per friend = 45 friends to lift on edge. Yes, that's a good DIY idea!

I'd rent the trailer compressor with pneumatic buster for that job.

What are you parking on it? 2" will crack, 4", maybe not. Be safe, G
 

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Concrete & Masonry
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I'm thinking now, rent jackhammer, build forms, put in rebar, buy many bags of cement.
It will be driven on and there is no easy way to provide a bed for this elevated slab.

Next question: do these elec. jack hammers have enough power to crack 6" of concrete?
The last one I rented could barely do sandstone.

Or, I could abrade or roughen or remove the top surface of the existing slab so that new concrete poured on top would be 2" to 4" thick?
You could possibly get the concrete topping to last for a while, but your probably only compounding the problem. The issue is settling or poor subgrade, & adding more weight will inevitably cause the slab to sink further in the future. It may seem strange to some, but in the thousands of yards of concrete i've torn out through the years, the thickest concrete seems to have performed the worst overall. Heavier concrete is no match for "Mother Nature!"
 
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