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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I need to extend the current 50AMP rated 4wire 6AWG Aluminum drop in my kitchen by about 10 feet, as I'm doing some remodeling. The circuit will power a 30AMP electric oven. For the extension I have chosen to go with 8 AWG Copper 4 wire cable.
Though I have done a lot research on the web, and I have some questions regarding connecting AL and CU:
1. What is the preferred method to connect 6AWG AL and 8AWG CU: AL/CU Wirenuts or AL/CU Split bolts? I will be using Noalox grease, and the recommended type of tapes for split bolts.
2. I could not find AL/CU rated wirenuts that fit this size of cables, are there any out there that I'm not aware of?
3. Could I use CU wirenuts but with Noalox and tape the nut securely?

Re-wiring the whole circuit with CU wire is not an affordable option for me here. I want to go with the next best option. Thanks in Advance.
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Use splitbolt connectors listed for connecting AL to CU. Tape with a good quality 3M electrical tape. Make sure junction box is sized correctly and use connectors. Ground the Jb.
 

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Use splitbolt connectors listed for connecting AL to CU. Tape with a good quality 3M electrical tape. Make sure junction box is sized correctly and use connectors. Ground the Jb.
Actually, you are to use the Heat Shrink that either comes with the kit, or you purchase some to place over the connector. Never use tape with this type of connection.
 

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When splicing CU to AL wire, the two wires cannot be in contact with each other even if an anti-oxidant is used. This is why you can't use wire nuts. Split bolts designed for this have a divider plate the keeps the wires apart and there is a butt splice that has a barrier so the two wires can't make contact.
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Actually, you are to use the Heat Shrink that either comes with the kit, or you purchase some to place over the connector. Never use tape with this type of connection.
Actually, split bolt connectors do not come in a kit. They are purchased seperately, and after installation, are taped with electrical tape. Make sure a good quailty electrical tape (3M) is used. Also, the moderator over at Mike Holt agrees also. :yes:
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Tape is not the proper way, using Shrink Tubing that is properly sized for these terminals is the best way, since electical tape tends to undo itself. Also, does not matter what the brand, I would not use electric tape on this type of splice. The proper way if you have to do it, is use Rubber tape, then Electric tape, then use a water proof coating rated for electrical use to hold tight, and create a water/air tight seal. But again, not the proper way when working with high voltage/high amperage splices.
 

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Actually, split bolt connectors do not come in a kit. They are purchased seperately, and after installation, are taped with electrical tape. Make sure a good quailty electrical tape (3M) is used. Also, the moderator over at Mike Holt agrees also. :yes:
Don's post that you linked to says they should be taped with RUBBER tape first, then electrical tape over that. He also mentions an under-layer of cambric tape to ease disassembly. I concur. Rubber tape is the traditional method, and the most effective, but it's hard to remove if there's nothing under it. Standard electrical tape by itself is not thick enough and has a tendency to self-unwind over time.
 
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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Don's post that you linked to says they should be taped with RUBBER tape first, then electrical tape over that. He also mentions an under-layer of cambric tape to ease disassembly. I concur. Rubber tape is the traditional method, and the most effective, but it's hard to remove if there's nothing under it. Standard electrical tape by itself is not thick enough and has a tendency to self-unwind over time.
You are correct. I should have been more specific. Either way they are taped.
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Tape is not the proper way, using Shrink Tubing that is properly sized for these terminals is the best way, since electical tape tends to undo itself. Also, does not matter what the brand, I would not use electric tape on this type of splice. The proper way if you have to do it, is use Rubber tape, then Electric tape, then use a water proof coating rated for electrical use to hold tight, and create a water/air tight seal. But again, not the proper way when working with high voltage/high amperage splices.
Been taping (rubber and plastic) them for over thirtyfive years and never had a problem. I thought the OP was asking about a small 30 A circuit. Didn't see anything about high voltage/high amperage.
 

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Before we get too far did the OP have 3 conductor SE cable or 4 conductor SER cable that will make the diffrence on codewise.

With 3 conductor SE cable it can NOT be extended at all but with 4 conductor SER cable it can be extend without issue.

Merci,
Marc
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Thank you guys for the suggestions.
For connecting the 6AWG AL and 8AWG CU, I'm using AL/CU split bolts with the divider strip between the wires. The wires have been coated with Noalox grease, I taped it in the following order:
1. 4 layers of 3M Vinyl electrical tape super 33+
2. 3 layers of 3M Rubber mastic tape 2228
3. 4 layers of 3M Vinyl Electrical Tape 88

I could not find heat shrink tubing, but i made sure the connection is secure and water/air tight. Please provide your comments/opinions. Thanks.
:thumbsup:
 

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Lic Electrical Inspector
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Did it fit in the box? A little excessive with the tabe but no doubt it will be safe. Don't worry about the heat shrink. It is unnecessary.
 

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Actually, split bolt connectors do not come in a kit. They are purchased seperately, and after installation, are taped with electrical tape. Make sure a good quailty electrical tape (3M) is used. Also, the moderator over at Mike Holt agrees also. :yes:
This way is totally acceptable. You could also use rubber splice tape first and than reg electrical tape over top.
 
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