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I purchased a new LG dual fuel range that is rated at 6.9kW at 240VAC. This is replacing an all-gas range that is currently on a 15A/110V line. Prior to having my basement finished, I had my contractor run EMT conduit from behind the oven to my panel, which is a 35' run. Unfortunately, he only ran 1/2" EMT.

The oven specs call for a 40A breaker, but a 40A breaker requires 8/3 wire, which includes 3#8 AWG wires and 1#10 AWG ground. The NEC code states that the maximum fill for 1/2" EMT is 3#8 AWG wires.

Do I have any viable options here, or should I return the range and go with a gas-only model?

Option #1: Run 10/3 wire and a 30A breaker. The downside here would seem to be that using all electrical components of the range at the same time could cause the breaker to trip. I know [email protected] = 28.75A, but that doesn't account for only running at 80% of the breaker max. I'm not sure if the breaker would actually trip or not. Is this safe?

Option #2: Try to pull all 4 wires in the 8/3 wire (3#8 and 1#10) through the 1/2" EMT. This would technically be over the NEC max fill. Would this be possible? More importantly, would this be safe?

Option #3: Use both the new 1/2" EMT and the existing 1/2" EMT to run the 8/3 wires. The existing 110V line is longer needed, so I could pull the old wire out and have both 1/2" conduits. The two conduits are not right next to each other right now, but I could cut the drywall out behind the range and bring them together. Can I put two 1/2" EMT conduits into a single gang box?

Any opinions on these or other options I might not have considered?

Thanks!
 

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Master Electrician
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If the emt is continuous from panel to range j-box and is properly intstalled the emt may be used for equipment grounding in lieu of an additional equipment grounding conductor.
 

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Option #1: Run 10/3 wire and a 30A breaker. The downside here would seem to be that using all electrical components of the range at the same time could cause the breaker to trip. I know [email protected]240V = 28.75A, but that doesn't account for only running at 80% of the breaker max. I'm not sure if the breaker would actually trip or not. Is this safe?
The short answer to that is that a 30 A breaker should carry anything less than 30 A forever!

See https://www.tdi.texas.gov/fire/documents/fmnec70papers.pdf
 

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JW
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OP- range circuit has to be sized at 40 amps, per the NEC. Breakers can be loaded up to 100% of their rating with no issues (as long as the load is not continuous).


Brric is spot on with his advice- use the EMT as your ground and pull (3) #8 wires.

Edit- since the range is less than 8.75 kw, a 30 amp branch circuit with #10 wire is fine.
 

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Master Electrician
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OP- range circuit has to be sized at 40 amps, per the NEC. Breakers can be loaded up to 100% of their rating with no issues (as long as the load is not continuous).


Brric is spot on with his advice- use the EMT as your ground and pull (3) #8 wires.

Edit- since the range is less than 8.75 kw, a 30 amp branch circuit with #10 wire is fine.
Where can one find a code reference for a 30 amp circuit for an8.75 kW range?
 

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JW
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Maybe I was not clear.

I meant that since this range was only rated at 6.9 kw, a 30 amp branch circuit would suffice.

40 amp circuits are the minimum requirement if the rating of the range is 8.75 kw or higher.
 
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