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ok I'm sure this has been discussed countless times.

But if you were drywalling now on Master bedroom and bathroom addition (SoCal). Would you go 5/8"? Door jambs shouldn't be an issue here.

I like the idea of stiffer, straighter and a little more sound protection especially around the bathroom, etc. Actually thought about (2x) 1/2" for a second but that's probably overkill.

Or is 1/2 on the walls good enough and avoid the extra weight installing 5/8.

Or just go 5/8 and suck it up ... haha
 

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You are talking about an 1/8th of an inch. Majority of the stock you are going to find at any Box store is going to just be 5/8". You could probably get it cheaper from the local warehouse that contractors use for Drywall & Mud delivery. They can also bring the corners on the same load.
 

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You are talking about an 1/8th of an inch. Majority of the stock you are going to find at any Box store is going to just be 5/8". You could probably get it cheaper from the local warehouse that contractors use for Drywall & Mud delivery. They can also bring the corners on the same load.
Don't mean to be picky but any box store I have ever been in has 1 stack of 5/8 and about 10 stacks of 1/2". And I doubt most suppliers would deliver unless it's a really large bathroom.
 
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1/2" drywall is in much higher stock here in NC.

The extra 1/8" personally makes a significant difference in weight/handling, to me. But if you have a crew, that's not your concern. It makes very little difference in sound blocking though. There are far better solutions for sound blocking, some of which are affordable if you do it up front.
 

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It all depends where you live. 1/8 of an inch does not make a difference when you have drywallers lifting drywall on a lift all of the time, or moving it around.

Even with two people, I had no problems lifting 5/8's when I redid my Bathroom.

It has nothing to do with sound blocking. It has to do with making for a better finished product.
 

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Missing the issue I guess. any big box store in my area has both 5/8" and 1/2" drywall. Doesn't matter if there are ten stacks of one and one stack of the other, they all carry both.

5/8 is significantly stronger, also heavier, but there is very little difference in price.

A typical approach in my area would be 1/2" blue board all around with a 1/8" skim coat of plaster which gives you a rock hard, seamless finish. Ron
 

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Missing the issue I guess. any big box store in my area has both 5/8" and 1/2" drywall. Doesn't matter if there are ten stacks of one and one stack of the other, they all carry both.

5/8 is significantly stronger, also heavier, but there is very little difference in price.

A typical approach in my area would be 1/2" blue board all around with a 1/8" skim coat of plaster which gives you a rock hard, seamless finish. Ron
Not missing anything. Every part of the country uses different brands and sizes of Drywall and Plywood. They use thicker Drywall and Plywood in the Midwest and plains, because of those things called Tornadoes.

I had no issue lifting 5/8's, like everyone else in my area that uses it.

Also no one uses Blue Board or skims plaster on walls in this part of the country, unless it is a historical home that is protected by the state or fed's, so that they can stay with the historical look.
 

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I also know of no one who does any plaster skim in this area. However, I am curious how 5/8" drywall can help in a tornado.....
It is just what the rules are being written for when you rebuild your home. Also it is the stores cutting costs down. You see more 5/8's plywood & OSB, along with Drywall being sold, then 1/2".
 

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However, I am curious how 5/8" drywall can help in a tornado.....
5/8" drywall does have a shear value. I've worked in older big Type V buildings, and the engineered "S" pages had denoted interior shear wall with only 5/8 Type X GWB, with a very rigid fastening schedule. These wall were stacked above more normal shear walls with two sides of 1/2 ply on the lowest level, changing to one side ply at higher floors.
 

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Where I am (and have been) most of the plywood being sold is 3/4" and most all the drywall is 1/2" some 3/8 very little 1/4 and 5/8 for most ceilings.
 
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