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The receptacle shown should have an in-use cover installed. The trim plate shown is for dry locations.
 

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The OP says it's in a room. I agree—the siding makes it look like it's exterior, but maybe it's a sun room addition kind of situation.

OP, can you clarify if this is an outdoor location?
 

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The OP says it's in a room. I agree—the siding makes it look like it's exterior, but maybe it's a sun room addition kind of situation.

OP, can you clarify if this is an outdoor location?
I have a GFCI in my bath with wires also ran from it to a GFCI located outside.
From what he posted, I think this is a bathroom, and his wiring exited the bathroom to have an outside receptacle, and from there who knows, back into the bathroom or onto something else like more receptacles or fixtures.

That's why seharper advised to not just connect to the load side of the GFCI if OP does not know what that does and he intended for it to behave that way. It seems OP just replaced every receptacle with GFCI so he may have a GFCI already upstream of this one, or another downstream of this one.

So if there is an 85 year old elderly taking a shower at night, with shampoo on his/her hair, and all of a sudden the outside GFCI tripped. His bathroom lights and exhaust fan turns off because they are all on the load side of that GFCI, he's in total darkness, he has shampoo dripping down his eyes, stepping out of the tub feeling for the door knob or light switch, floor is wet and slippery. Or the OP has a Ring video bell or security camera on the load side of the GFCI, and once it trips, they stop working. He wouldn't even know they are not working until days later.

If I were OP I would not wire them on the load side unless I trace the rest of it to receptacles and fixtures I know this is the behavior I want.
 
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