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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have an unusual (i hope) request for the forum members and hope you folks can help me.
I have 2 locations where I want to turn my lights on and 5 lights. One location needs to be able to turn all 5 lights on, whereas the other location would only turn one of the 5 lights. How do I wire this monstrosity?
Please help with specifics - I would much appreciate it.

Thanks.
 

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Master Electrician
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You will need two three-ways at each location. A three way at each location controls 4 lights. Another three way at each location will control one light.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Let's play this scenario out:

You want to be able to turn on all 5 lights from location "A"
You want to be able to turn on one of those 5 lights from location "B"

So far, so good?

Are you prepared to be compelled to turn OFF the lights from the same location that you turned them on from?

In other words, IF you turned on all 5 lights from location A, then went to the other switch, you won't be able to turn them off from there. You'll have to go back to the original location to turn `em all off?

If this is the case, then the solution is quite simple:

Install a single-pole switch for the single light at location "B"

Then install a double-pole switch at location "A" ---> One side to control the remaining 4 lights, and the other side wired in parallel with switch B to redundantly control the single light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for your replies - I do appreciate it.
KBSparky - you described in much better way what I wanted to do. It is exactly what I am attempting. I re-read your post few times and I am good all the way till last statement. This is where I get in trouble. So the way I understand is as follows. For the location where I want to control all the lights I need to put in a 3-way switch. I wire 4 lights from that switch. The red wire from 3-way switch then goes to a single switch where I can control one light - correct? I have trouble with this - ' the other side wired in parallel with switch B to redundantly control the single light' -> I was trying to research but have to eat my pride and ask what does this mean...
I attached a simple diagram for reference hoping this is what you meant. Here is the location: http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5159749773/
I would much appreciate if you could take a look and validate this for me. I think my trouble comes with connection to the last light.

Thank you very much in advance.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Nowhere did I state that you were to use a 3-way switch. I described the use of a single pole, and a double pole switch.

Your initial post stated that you wanted 2 switches .... one where 5 lights would be turned on, and the other would only turn on one of those five lights.

I have attached a diagram showing this:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
KB- I had wrongly presumed that double-pole switch refers to a 3-way switch so I appreciate the clarification. It is perhaps my fault for not wanting to over-complicate my initial question and omitting there are two locations for turning all 5 lights. Given that, when reading your post I immediately presumed 3-way switch.
Will the diagram work if I was to substitute the double-pole switch with a 3-way switch so I can keep the two locations for turning on all the lights and having just one location turning one light?

I realize this is painful as my knowledge is limited in the field (as you can see from the above) - however, I sincerely appreciate all the help you had already provided.
 

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There is such a thing as a 3 way double pole switch (double pole double throw; DPDT*) but I do not think you want that. Separate single pole switches (2 gang box) would be better.

Use two standard 3 way setups, one for the foursome and one for the single.

With 3 way double pole at one location you could end up with turning one light (the single light) on and the other light (the other 4 lights) off, alternating, and having to walk to the other location to get the single light off.

* (OT for budding electricians)
>>> had wrongly presumed that double-pole (DPST) switch refers to a 3-way, SPDT, switch <<<
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for responding. I was able to connect the switches correctly and it works! This is great - I appreciate you all helping me out!
 
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