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Discussion Starter #21
Engineer did not specify. Also, he did not specify any rebar either. I was planning on just drilling afterwords but I am wondering which would be "easier" for a DIY'er. In addition, this is getting inspected so it obviously has to be code compliant.

If the engineer did not call for steel, would I be incorrect in adding some (in the inspectors eyes)?

Tom
 

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"You can do anything"-Mom
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No. But if the engineer signed and sealed a plan without rebar and without anchor bolt specifications, I'd be calling that engineer and asking him/her what you should do. I find it hard to believe that a PE would put years and years of blood, sweat, and tears on the line by not covering all of their bases. Engineers just don't leave things to interpretation.
 

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You can add steel, but since the footing itself is 12" thick, it will not see any bending and all stresses are from shear radiating out (45 degrees downward) from the footprint of a base plate so a unreinforced "chuck" of concrete will be adequate.

If you want to feel "warm and fuzzy", throw in some steel and jump through the hoops of supporting it and placing the concrete properly with the steel in the way.

You never know what mood an inspector is in and how much time he has to spend, since most communities do not make a penny on inspections concerning the time and paper work for problems that require even more work.

Dick
 

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90%+ of the 24" x 24" x 12" post pads we pour do not receive rebar, for the reason Dick stated above.

As for anchors, "if" installed the way I mentioned before (the pad is finished 3-4" below the floor, and a floor cap is poured AFTER the column is set) there is no need for anchors at the base.........
 
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