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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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The genarator has a 120/240 volt receptacle, and the heater is a straight 208/240 plug.

The plug and receptale will not work together.
 

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receptacles and plugs are rated for both voltage and current (amps). Each different design is that way so you cannot plug an incorrect plug into a give receptacle.


Many generators use a 30 amp 120/240 receptacle. That has 4 conductors and supplies both 120 volt and 240 volts supplies up to 30 amps. There are also receptacles that are designed to supply just 240 voltage. Those would have only 3 conductors.

then to further make things more fun, there are straight blade receptacles and twist lock receptacles. The twist lock use a slight twisting motion to lock the plug into the receptacle so it is not accidentally removed.

you can go to this site and see a chart of some of the various receptacle designs. There are a lot more but I think this one likely included what you are looking at there.

http://www.nooutage.com/nema_configurations.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for that info. So do you think I can find a gererator that will accept that plug style? That's all I really need to worry about, right? Is that plug fitting into the correct receptical. Thanks.
 

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Just make an adapter with a short length of cable, or replace the plug on the heater so it matches the generator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The genarator has a 120/240 volt receptacle, and the heater is a straight 208/240 plug.

The plug and receptale will not work together.



" Just make an adapter with a short length of cable, or replace the plug on the heater so it matches the generator".

Will this work?
 

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" Just make an adapter with a short length of cable, or replace the plug on the heater so it matches the generator".

Will this work?
Yes. That's why I suggested it.
 

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Actually, you have a problem. That generator isn't big enough for that heater. It's not a 4500W generator, it's only 3500 (read the fine print) and that heater requires 4kW at 240V. You'll need a bit bigger generator. It's usually a good idea to have at least 25% extra generator capacity beyond the load you're using, otherwise it may not last very long. You might try a 5kW generator - but make sure it's really 5kW continuous, not 5kW peak with a lower continuous rating.

You'll still have to make an adapter cable or replace the plug on the heater.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok thanks. So after I snip the end of the heater plug off ( which I don't have yet ) there will be three wires: White, Black, & Red? White not being used? Thanks.
 

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Ok thanks. So after I snip the end of the heater plug off ( which I don't have yet ) there will be three wires: White, Black, & Red? White not being used? Thanks.
no. on the heater there will be only 3 wires: they could be just about any color but one should be green. That will go to the ground terminal in the plug usually a green screw). The other 2 wires will go to the hot wire terminals (usually brass colored screws) There will be nothing on the neutral connection (usually a silver colored screw)

what mpoulton was meaning to say is you will not connect anything to the neutral connection of the plug. The neutral wire would be a white wire. In your situation, you aren't going to actually have any white wires to use as a neutral although one of the wires in your cord on the heater might be white, it still isn't a neutral wire if your heater is a straight 240 volt appliance.
 

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Whoa...don't forget the part that the generator won't handle that load....no matter what plug confuguration you come up with. Forget the adapter, it's not going to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
no. on the heater there will be only 3 wires: they could be just about any color but one should be green. That will go to the ground terminal in the plug usually a green screw). The other 2 wires will go to the hot wire terminals (usually brass colored screws) There will be nothing on the neutral connection (usually a silver colored screw)

what mpoulton was meaning to say is you will not connect anything to the neutral connection of the plug. The neutral wire would be a white wire. In your situation, you aren't going to actually have any white wires to use as a neutral although one of the wires in your cord on the heater might be white, it still isn't a neutral wire if your heater is a straight 240 volt appliance.

Ok..........thanks for explaining that a little clearer, thanks!
 

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I'm curious...are you indending to have this heater permanently installed? I would think it would be cheaper to wire it in directly than pay for the gas to keep the generator running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
No.......just want to use it during the winter months in the garage. Need the generator as well for when are electricity goes out during a storm, which is quite frequent around here. So are basement doesn't get flooded. Need it for the sump pump. Plan on moving in the near future that's why I don't want to run 220 out to the garage. Thanks for the help.
 

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Are you using a gas generator to power a heater? It would be more efficient to use propane and just use a propane heater. That way your not converting heat to movement, then to electricity, and then back to heat again. Just a thought...

As far as the wiring, you could probably change the plug provided that the wattage/voltage matches.
 
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