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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, Ya'll!

I hope you are all well and safe in this crazy world!

Is it possible to use a 220V dryer with a step-up transformer of ample amperage on a 110V circuit? The dryer has a 4-prong plug. I have not seen any adapters, which let you plug in a 4-prong dryer plug into a universal 220V outlet, which makes me a bit curious.

Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.

Oliver
 

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Technically possible if you have a 60 amp 120 volt circuit. I've never seen one.

What do you mean by a "universal 220V outlet"? Most of those available are part of power strips or converters that aren't much good for anything other than a laptop.
 

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It might be possible , but will not be practical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Technically possible if you have a 60 amp 120 volt circuit. I've never seen one.

What do you mean by a "universal 220V outlet"? Most of those available are part of power strips or converters that aren't much good for anything other than a laptop.
Why 60A? Universal as in Type A-L.
 

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As said, the wattage the dryer needs will far excede any 120 volt circuit you have.
Although it seems like an unrelated question, a "standard" 220 (240) circuit does not have a neutral (120/240).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As said, the wattage the dryer needs will far excede any 120 volt circuit you have.
Although it seems like an unrelated question, a "standard" 220 (240) circuit does not have a neutral (120/240).
I am talking about using something like a Simaran VSR-5000, not a power strip or simple converter.
 

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How do you plan to power the 120v parts (motor, light, possibly control circuits). One of the 4 pins in the plug is the neutral.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How do you plan to power the 120v parts (motor, light, possibly control circuits). One of the 4 pins in the plug is the neutral.
I guess I am confused. Why would the 220V dryer have parts that need to be powered by 110V?
 

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A 4 prong dryer receptacle is rated at 30 amps at 240 volts. 30*240=7200 watts of power. At 120 volts you need 60 amps to get the same amount of power.

"Universal A-L" are mostly low amperage and are not designed to handle 30 amp dryer circuits. You install more substantial receptacles for high amperage. Also, as mentioned, they don't have the right pins. They normally have a hot, neutral, and ground. North American dryer plugs need two hots, neutral, and ground. (older installs don't have a ground).

The motor and timer of a dryer are 120 volts so they can use the same parts for a 120v gas dryer.
 

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I guess I am confused. Why would the 220V dryer have parts that need to be powered by 110V?
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Random Internet image

The only component that uses 240v s the heater. If t wasn't thus, you wouldn't need a 4-prong plug and would have to search high and low for a 240v light bulb.
 

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Is it possible to use a 220V dryer with a step-up transformer of ample amperage on a 110V circuit?
Sure, but no "110V" circuit exists which could power it. "110V" loads are generally relatively small. There'd never be any reason to make a "110V" circuit large enough to power an electric dryer. It isn't going to happen, and if this makes no sense to you, then spend a lot of time learning about electricity basics.

The dryer has a 4-prong plug. I have not seen any adapters, which let you plug in a 4-prong dryer plug into a universal 220V outlet, which makes me a bit curious.
Wait, a "universal 220V outlet"? Are you in the Philippines?

Philippines uses North American style appliances, and in the former USA built neighborhoods, the power is 220V center-ground (no neutral). And a very annoying fact of Philippine power is they abuse the NEMA 1 and NEMA 5 socket styles for 220V power. This might lead someone to mistake the 220V Philippine sockets for 110V.

If you have acquired a 120V/240V appliance from North America, it's not going to work without significant hacking. You would need to add a transformer to synthesize 120V for the loads which need it.

Regardless, the dryer needs about 23A of power at 220V if you want the heat to work. That won't be available at a "common" receptacle in any country.
 

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Yeah.....this seems like a half baked question.....or fully baked.... First explain why you NEED to power it from 120V? that is the very first question. You can get a generator to run that load, does that solve your problem?

Ultimately you will require an oversized 120pri120/240sec transformer which won't be cheap. There are likely other alternatives but you have gave zero clues. Poor details gets poor replies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A 4 prong dryer receptacle is rated at 30 amps at 240 volts. 30*240=7200 watts of power. At 120 volts you need 60 amps to get the same amount of power.

"Universal A-L" are mostly low amperage and are not designed to handle 30 amp dryer circuits. You install more substantial receptacles for high amperage. Also, as mentioned, they don't have the right pins. They normally have a hot, neutral, and ground. North American dryer plugs need two hots, neutral, and ground. (older installs don't have a ground).

The motor and timer of a dryer are 120 volts so they can use the same parts for a 120v gas dryer.
Thank you. I think the AMP explanation is the magic answer. Appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah.....this seems like a half baked question.....or fully baked.... First explain why you NEED to power it from 120V? that is the very first question. You can get a generator to run that load, does that solve your problem?

Ultimately you will require an oversized 120pri120/240sec transformer which won't be cheap. There are likely other alternatives but you have gave zero clues. Poor details gets poor replies.
Have no 240V outlet. Is a commercial space where getting a 240V into the needed location is not really feasible. Generator is too loud. Cost for a transformer would be lower than getting 240V access.

But, I think the answer is in the inability to get the required Amperage from the 110V line, so providing more details is moot to begin with. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Sure, but no "110V" circuit exists which could power it. "110V" loads are generally relatively small. There'd never be any reason to make a "110V" circuit large enough to power an electric dryer. It isn't going to happen, and if this makes no sense to you, then spend a lot of time learning about electricity basics.



Wait, a "universal 220V outlet"? Are you in the Philippines?

Philippines uses North American style appliances, and in the former USA built neighborhoods, the power is 220V center-ground (no neutral). And a very annoying fact of Philippine power is they abuse the NEMA 1 and NEMA 5 socket styles for 220V power. This might lead someone to mistake the 220V Philippine sockets for 110V.

If you have acquired a 120V/240V appliance from North America, it's not going to work without significant hacking. You would need to add a transformer to synthesize 120V for the loads which need it.

Regardless, the dryer needs about 23A of power at 220V if you want the heat to work. That won't be available at a "common" receptacle in any country.
Yes, thank you. Not in the Philippines, but most transformers come with universal 240V outlets. Again, not an issue as it seems that the amperage drawn would be exceeding the line, transformer or not. Thank you..
 

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Right, but obviously the 120v components inside the dryer work when you hook it up to a 240v outlet.
I don't think you quite follow how this works, but since you can't get the amperage, it is as you say, moot. Buy a gas drier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I don't think you quite follow how this works, but since you can't get the amperage, it is as you say, moot. Buy a gas drier.
No gas, no vents in the location. And, what I am not following/missing?
 
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