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I hope this is the right place to put this. I would like to put a washer and dryer in my apartment - the ones I am looking at will fit nicely... except one small problem. While the washer runs off of a regular three prong 110v plug, the dryer requires one of those 220v giant plugs with 4 prongs. Naturally there isn't one to be found in my apartment...except the ones my refrigerator and stove and such are plugged into. So maybe this is a really stupid question, but is it possible to just get an extension cord for the - lets say stove plug - and then plug the stove and dryer in at the same time? Obviously I couldn't use both at the same time, I know - but it is the only thing I can think of other than seeing if it is possible to just somehow replace the cord on the dryer itself to a regular cord. I found some instructions online for doing that, that said it is safe, the dryer just takes longer to dry...but it seems like it would be a fire hazard? Not to mention voiding the heck out of the warranty. Any ideas? I don't suppose there is some sort of converter I can plug the dryer into that will just step it down to a 110v and let me use a regular plug?
 

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Sorry no adaptors to run a 240v dryer off 120v !
Least not one you could afford.

Can you make and use a 240v extention cord - yes !

Is it safe ? maybe, we dont know your locations specifics.

Where would it be run ?

Is it code compliant thats the main thing ?

Modifing the cord (ie changing it ) would void listing and all insurances.

Using an extention cable would be a better option
provided it is safe and code compliant
which is doubtful
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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First see if you are allowed to install a Washer / Dryer set. If so tell the management that you want a 220 V outlet for a dryer installed.

There used to be a "stack pack" unit made that was a 120 V setup. They were made for apartment spaces, look into that as well.

There is a reason that you will not find an extension cord for 220. It is not a good idea.

ED
 

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Also, the stove is a 40 or 50 amp circuit. Your dryer needs a 30 amp circuit.
 

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You can make a "power strip" with breakers, aka portable subpanel. It would have one cord and plug for the 40 or 50 amp stove receptacle. It would have a 30 amp receptacle with 30 amp breaker for the dryer and a 40 (or 50) amp receptacle with matching breaker for the stove.

But such a device is not really meant to be plugged into the receptacle behind the stove as a permanent installation.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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You can make a "power strip" with breakers, aka portable subpanel. It would have one cord and plug for the 40 or 50 amp stove receptacle. It would have a 30 amp receptacle with 30 amp breaker for the dryer and a 40 (or 50) amp receptacle with matching breaker for the stove.

But such a device is not really meant to be plugged into the receptacle behind the stove as a permanent installation.
Then why bring up the idea.?

The poster needs a proper 4 wire 120/240 VAC, 30 amp receptacle and a dryer vent.
 

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JOATMON
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The first question the OP needs to answer is...does the apartment have connections for a washer and dryer? That is, water supply and drain along with a vent for the dryer.

If there is no dryer vent....then a dryer is not a good idea.

Assuming the apartment has the above but no 230VAC outlet, then maybe it has gas?

If you found an electric dryer that will fit, then you should be able to get the same dryer in gas. And to be honest, gas will be a lot cheaper to operate.
 

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Dryers are not to be used on extension cords. The receptacle should be located to allow the use without needing an extension cord.
 
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The code says the receptacle must be located within a certain distance of the expected location to avoid the need for an extension.
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Any extension cord looses a bit of the available power due to resistance over any distance, So the needed amperage is diminished at the dryer, Which causes the dryer to not function properly.

And this resistance in the cord causes the loss to be converted to a heat source, which in turn might cause the cord insulation to melt, which will cause a spark, igniting the home.
And a cord sized big enough to carry the dryers needed amperage is a definite " trip hazard".

So my aussie protégé SATISFIED?

ED
 

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It's not for my benefit it's for the o/p.

Whilst tripping could be a concern.
I don't think that a correct sized extention lead
Would get that hot !
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Again : There is a reason that high amp draw wiring is not to be left coiled, when in use.

The heat will cause the overlapped wires to fuse together.

Most extension cords are longer than needed , thus just piled together at one end. while in use.

But the O/P is not questioning my reason.

ED
 

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JOATMON
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Again : There is a reason that high amp draw wiring is not to be left coiled, when in use.

The heat will cause the overlapped wires to fuse together.

Most extension cords are longer than needed , thus just piled together at one end. while in use.

But the O/P is not questioning my reason.

ED
Nope....not the reason....if that were the case I know a LOT of companies using welders that would have issues. I really doubt the dryer could pull enough current to melt the insulation before the breaker tripped.

I believe there is this little NEC code that says extension cords shall not be used for fixed devices....extension cords are temporary.

The OP still hasn't answered if he has gas or not....or even a vent. I suspect we started asking questions and he realized that maybe he doesn't have everything he needs for a washer and dryer.
 

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JOATMON
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And the reason for the code is that coiled wires tend to heat up and melt.

Period END OF DISCUSSION

ED
No....not end of discussion. With all due respect, you don't know what your talking about. What your are basically saying is that if someone has an extension cord and they roll it up, the heat rise from that coiled up cord is going to cause damage.

Unless you don't have proper ckt protection, any heat rise is going to be only a fraction of what the insulation is designed for.

To put out a blanket statement on this forum such as yours is irresponsible.
 

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... Nope....not the reason....if that were the case I know a LOT of companies using welders that would have issues. I really doubt the dryer could pull enough current to melt the insulation of a coiled up extension cord before the breaker tripped. ...
Why does the vacuum cleaner instructions recommend pulling the full length of cord out of the reel/retractor before using the vac'?
 
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