DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

I am in the market to buying my first kiln which I will be setting up in an old blacksmith shop. the kiln I am interested in buying is a 220volt but my outlet puts out 240volts. will this be a problem?
I am concerned about burning out my equipment
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,471 Posts
How old is this kiln? What does the manual for it say? Is that the receptacle you intend to use, or is that just what's there now? According to the Cress website, the kiln uses a 6-30R receptacle.

Actually, though the voltage available now is still colloquially referred to as "220," that voltage has not been around for years. In the U.S. anyway, it's really 240.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,468 Posts
Contact the manufacturer and confirm that it is only suitable for 220v
It might just be ok
as it is rare to find 220v in the USA.


If you need to, you can reduce the mains with a straight transformer
or even a "bucking" transformer.

:whistling2:
 

·
Civil Engineer
Joined
·
5,832 Posts
Just to be clear, your outlet does not "put out" voltage, it simply passes service voltage along to the device you plug in. Your service is rated for a particular voltage, in the U.S. residential service is typically 240V single phase, industrial service is typically three phase with numerous different voltages available. The outlet you showed is rated for 250V, meaning the outlet can be used for 250V or lower. That is also a single phase outlet with a rating of 50A.

Your kiln should come with a manual explaining what voltage it can run on, how many amps it draws, what size breaker it requires. Often direct heat devices can run at a variety of voltages and amps, the manual should explain it all.
 

·
Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
Joined
·
3,403 Posts
220V and 240V are more or less the same thing. Both refer to the nominal voltage of one of the standard electrical systems in the US. Back in the olden days, it was literally 220V; nowadays it's pretty much always closer to 240V. A kiln won't care. It will work fine.
 

·
Idiot Emeritus
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
While I'm more than pretty sure this kiln will operate on 240 volts, if needed, a buck-boost transformer can be connected to reduce the 240 to closer to 220.

The basic standard voltage reduction of these units is 12, 16, 24 and 32.

If the 16 volt model is used, the end result will be somewhere around 224 volts, the 24 volt one will be around 216 volts.

Generally speaking, heating devices last longer with lower voltage, but the heat output is reduced as well.

Also, just because the service is 240 volts, it doesn't mean that exactly 240 volts will be present at the receptacle. Around here, 240 is anywhere from about 235 to 245. And even this varies during the day and night.

Rob
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top