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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I added a second well to my property and have a question about running them to my house simultaneously.
The first one is about 380' deep, produces about 18-20 gallons/min and is connected to the house with its own pressure tank.
The second one is about 600' deep, produces 24-28 gallons/min and has its own pressure tank as well. I installed it as a backup to my house and also to help maintain the water level on a 1 acre pond I put in.
The second well is connected just before a sand filter and pressure tank for the other well with separate shut off valves and power.
Currently, I use the second well as the primary because it produces more and allows me to run water to my pond for a couple hours every night, and afterward, my sprinkler system to my landscape. (Both wells are connected to my sprinkler system based on where I connected it in) I usually don't have an issue with water pressure because it does the pond and landscape stuff after I go to bed.
I leave the original one off accept once every month or so when I need to run the second for a longer time to the pond because the current timer duration is not long enough to keep it where I want the pond level. (If that made sense)
Unfortunately, I was up later than usual with company and realized that I had little water pressure to the house and needed a shower. Short of going out and turning valves and turning on the power to the original well, there was nothing I could do.
My question is whether I can have both running at the same time and if so if that would cause any issues? One of my concerns is preventing the original well from back filling into the second well line. I figured there may be a way to address that by just adding a back flow device. I also read that it would be good to decrease the first well to a slightly lower pressure so the stronger well continues to do the most work. Will that work or is there something else that could create some issues.
 

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How far apart are your wells? How deep is the aquifer?

Also, what does your question have to do with Carpentry? :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How far apart are your wells? How deep is the aquifer?

Also, what does your question have to do with Carpentry? :unsure:
WTH? I'm not sure how I managed to put it under carpentry.😖 Is there a way to move it to plumbing?

The wells are about 150' apart. The first well aquifer is about 20' deep. I believe, the second well aquifer is 20-30' deep
 

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It's in plumbing forum now.

All good questions that I'm not qualify enough to answer. Others may know for sure.

To me, your logic would work.

Tee them together somewhere, backflow preventer, set the strong well pressure switch to do most the work and the other one to come on as needed.

Btw, welcome to the forums rmeiner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's in plumbing forum now.

All good questions that I'm not qualify enough to answer. Others may know for sure.

To me, your logic would work.

Tee them together somewhere, backflow preventer, set the strong well pressure switch to do most the work and the other one to come on as needed.

Btw, welcome to the forums rmeiner.
Thanks for the opinion and the welcome. I posted a separate conversation on the plumbing thread once you mentioned it being in the wrong place. I couldn't find a way to move this one. And thanks for pointing out that I put it under the wrong thread.
 

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Are your wells far enough apart that drawdown from one has no effect on the other?

Unless something is weird, my expectation would be that both wells are in the same aquifer, so at rest the water elevation in each well should be close to identical.
 

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Thanks for the opinion and the welcome. I posted a separate conversation on the plumbing thread once you mentioned it being in the wrong place. I couldn't find a way to move this one. And thanks for pointing out that I put it under the wrong thread.
No problem. I will move it and merge threads. You can't do it.
 

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[orig] produces about 18-20 gallons/min
[second, used as primary] produces 24-28 gallons/min
I leave the original one off accept once every month or so when I need to run the second for a longer time to the pond because the current timer duration is not long enough to keep it where I want the pond level.
I can have both running at the same time and if so if that would cause any issues?
it would be good to decrease the first well to a slightly lower pressure so the stronger well continues to do the most work.
Will that work or is there something else that could create some issues.
Making an electrical analogy for this hydraulic circuit, the gals/min is amperes [19 & 26] & the pressure is volts. The pond is a capacitor & the wells are current sources rather than voltage sources.
I’d use two flow rate limiters [adjusting your current sources] rather than make pressure changes [adjusting your voltage sources] & adjust them to match expected delivery rates so neither well is likely to run dry.

As electrical circuits go, this one is fairly complex. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Are your wells far enough apart that drawdown from one has no effect on the other?

Unless something is weird, my expectation would be that both wells are in the same aquifer, so at rest the water elevation in each well should be close to identical.
No. My first well is in a different aquifer than my second. Most houses around me are in an aquifer that is between 350'-400' deep depending on elevation. My second well is almost 600' deep. Those are actually two different aquifers. I was told there are several. All at different depths. A farm near by me was said to have tapped at least 6 different aquifers with their well. It goes down over 3000' in order to have enough gallons/min to meet their needs.
 

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Give each pump its own check valve (back flow preventer) and its own pressure switch.

This lets you set different pressures (some experimentation needed) to make each pump work most efficiently.

Ideally you would want to give each a well-run-dry sensor but I don't know of such a gedget exists at reasonable cost.
 

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Ideally you would want to give each a well-run-dry sensor but I don't know of such a gedget exists at reasonable cost.
A current driven relay that senses the reduction in motor current & turns off that pump, then I guess a timer to reset it after awhile, hours maybe.
 

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I would set the primary well pump to come on at 30 psi and off at 50. I would set the second well pump to come on at 25 psi and off at 55. Then the second pump can work in high demand times without running for every use, causing both to short cycle. Both wells should already have a foot valve, which is a check valve preventing one well from filling the other well.
 

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I would recommend that your wells do not run at the same time. If one fails then all manner of bad things could happen.

I would think you could set the pressure on one to be higher than the other. Can not see your controls so I do not know how to do this for sure. You may need to add wiring or wireless between the wells for this added control.

We had two wells and pumps on the farm. The little one was always off electically and valved. and when the water pressure got low, I would be tasked to turn on the little well and then drive down to the big well turn it off and valve it off. Winter time we could not get water down to the big well so the water guys would dump the water on the lawn and let it soak into the well.
 
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