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Discussion Starter #1
I currently have a 2 door garage, but I want to convert it to a 1 door. I'm currently in the process of raising my rafters, but when I'm done, they're going to be significantly higher than the header of my garage door(s). Is this a problem? Is there anything significant I should take into consideration when converting from the 2 door to a 1 door? Thanks!

JP
 

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Jp,
As long as the header is properly sized and constructed for the opening width and what it has to support above, it should be fine. I've done this before. It ususally involves building a temorary wall a couple of feet in to suppport everyting above while you remove the old headers and install a new one.
When building the rough opening for the new door, size it to the size of the door. For example, a 16' x 7' door requires a 16' x 7' rough opening. Then when you put your jambs on (3/4") and apply your vinyl stops, you end up with a nice overlap on the outside. You need aprox. 14" above the door opening to the nearest overhead obstruction to fit 12" radius track and have the door clear. If you have a lot more room up above and plan on doing auto work with a lift involved, they make hi-lift track, which adds a vertical section in between the lower section of track (uprights) and the horizontal rails. This raises the door up closer to the ceiling and provides more headroom. You have to go to a real garage door company to get this, not a big box store.
Mike Hawkins:)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Jp,
As long as the header is properly sized and constructed for the opening width and what it has to support above, it should be fine. I've done this before. It ususally involves building a temorary wall a couple of feet in to suppport everyting above while you remove the old headers and install a new one.
When building the rough opening for the new door, size it to the size of the door. For example, a 16' x 7' door requires a 16' x 7' rough opening. Then when you put your jambs on (3/4") and apply your vinyl stops, you end up with a nice overlap on the outside. You need aprox. 14" above the door opening to the nearest overhead obstruction to fit 12" radius track and have the door clear. If you have a lot more room up above and plan on doing auto work with a lift involved, they make hi-lift track, which adds a vertical section in between the lower section of track (uprights) and the horizontal rails. This raises the door up closer to the ceiling and provides more headroom. You have to go to a real garage door company to get this, not a big box store.
Mike Hawkins:)
Ok Mike, I think I'm following you here, but I have a couple of questions.

1. Where/How do I connect the new header?

2. Where/How do I connect the temporary wall?

3. What are jambs?

4. What are vinyl stops?

Thanks!

JP
 

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Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.
 

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are you the poster who just had everyone jumping thru hoops for a solutin on moving your 2x up 16"? now you tell us you are raising the rafters? whats up with that
 

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Discussion Starter #6
are you the poster who just had everyone jumping thru hoops for a solutin on moving your 2x up 16"? now you tell us you are raising the rafters? whats up with that
Sorry tpolk, I mistyped. I'm raising my joists, not my rafters. Alls good.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.
There is no second story above the garage. There are rafters that hold lumber, etc, but thats it. The garage is detached and is 20'x20'. I haven't picked a door yet, but if my garage is 20x20, what do you suggest? Bigger is better ;).

JP
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Is this garage attached to your house?

One concern I would have is removing the center wall between the two doors. You are removing most likely a shear support to keep the building from racking. I believe that for a double garage door the framing on each side of the door needs to be about 2' or greater with sheer panel nailed to it. This is to keep the building from racking and falling over.

Hopefully, someone with the engineering codes can provide some more insight as to how much sheer dimension you need around the garage door, as I'm just recalling from memory what I've seen in the past on plans.

So many times people ask these questions but every situation is different and sometimes it is better to get an engineer to make sure the existing structure can handle this change. But if the situation is presented in a good way, a lot of people on here have pretty good knowledge and can point you in the right direction.

A few questions you could answer that might help others provide more in depth answers are:

1) is there a second story above the garage?
2) is it attached to a house?
3) dimensions of the garage, and of the door you want to install.
Oh and won't a newly installed header keep it from racking when I remove the center wall? My buddy told me to get 2 2x12x20s, sister them and then hang them on the last wall studs closest to the door. Is this correct?
 

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lvl structural lumber for that span and load, lumber company can do calcs but they will need all load info
 

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you will need to give them size of ceiling joist with span, roof material and rafter size with pitch of roof and what your attic storage expectations are,does roof have a structural ridge, Im guessing no from previous post. anything that will put load on header
 

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Discussion Starter #15
you will need to give them size of ceiling joist with span, roof material and rafter size with pitch of roof and what your attic storage expectations are,does roof have a structural ridge, Im guessing no from previous post. anything that will put load on header
Well, my current span is 22.5" and it wouldn't change if I hung a new header or? Not sure what my roof material is. My roof is 5/12 22.5 degree pitch. The rafters are 2x4s. What is a structural ridge? My storage expectations are minimal. I'm not planning on putting a lot up there.
 

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I converted two doors to one and used a steel beam for the header, as there was too little room for a wooden header. A metals yard fabricated the beam.

Suggest to think about putting in a door tall enough to ensure those tall SUV's and such can fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I converted two doors to one and used a steel beam for the header, as there was too little room for a wooden header. A metals yard fabricated the beam.

Suggest to think about putting in a door tall enough to ensure those tall SUV's and such can fit.
Where/how did you mount the header?
 

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I converted two doors to one and used a steel beam for the header, as there was too little room for a wooden header. A metals yard fabricated the beam.

Suggest to think about putting in a door tall enough to ensure those tall SUV's and such can fit.
Mine had to be steel too to allow for trucks/SUV's. It's pretty cool that I can pull an F250 into my garage.
 

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Myself I prefer LVL (wood) as I can install it
My middle LVL beams spanning 22' 6" were spec'd out at (3) 14"
I installed (3) 16"...supports great room wall above, attic wall above that, & 2 roof sections land on the attic wall

You need to have a beam sized based on the actual building & loads
22.5' span...how much wall on either side where the garage doors are ?
My garage is built up against the house...more stable

I would not try (2) 2x12's, get this sized & spec'd out properly

LVL beam:
 

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Jp,
If I read right, your 20 x 20 detached garage with no second story should be fine with a double 2 x 12 header with a 1/2" x 11" steel flitch plate sandwiched in between, bolted through. If you are not familiar with the framing terms, you really should consider hiring a carpenter for the day to help you with your project. It shouldn't cost that much and will help to insure it gets done right and no one gets hurt. Also, check with your local building department and make sure you are both on the same page with what you are doing. I wouldn't go any wider than 16' with your door. Center it in the wall and you will have 2' on each side.
Mike Hawkins:)
 
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