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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an interior wall (between master / living) with a 1x4 diagonal "shear" brace in it. The wall behind the fireplace to the right is exterior. Is this diagonal brace necessary? Pic attached.
 

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If you are in a hurricane zone it might well be. Without a location it is impossible to guess.
 

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It's probably necessary, as most framers don't put one in for looks without a callout on the plans.

What do you want to do... as there are alternatives to 1x4 let-in cross bracing.
 

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Being diagonal bracing is usually as high as possible to low as possible I suspect the purpose of that brace was to hold the adjoining stud assembly plumb for construction purposes and just never removed. And, that was a convenient nailing height.
 

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Being diagonal bracing is usually as high as possible to low as possible I suspect the purpose of that brace was to hold the adjoining stud assembly plumb for construction purposes and just never removed. And, that was a convenient nailing height.
Possible....it was just temp bracing..... Has the x-brace been let-in (recessed into) to the studs...maybe a big picture of the wall might help
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Unfortunately the wall has been closed up already. Attempting to put in-wall speakers in, this was an after the fact decision so now I'm trying to piece things together. I do not have any better pictures unfortunately. I do believe it is cut-in to the studs and runs to the base plate. This is the only section of the wall with this diagonal brace.
 

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retired framer
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I appears you have a short piece of exterior wall behind the fireplace. I would not remove the brace, no one just puts them in for entertainment. It will be there for a reason.
 

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Being diagonal bracing is usually as high as possible to low as possible I suspect the purpose of that brace was to hold the adjoining stud assembly plumb for construction purposes and just never removed. And, that was a convenient nailing height.
We can't see behind the insulation above the fireplace, so it might well go all the way up. It's still possible it was just there to hold the wall square while assembling, but I've never seen temp bracing get left behind or incorporated into the building.
 

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[B said:
NotYerUncleBob2[/B];6056717]We can't see behind the insulation above the fireplace, so it might well go all the way up. It's still possible it was just there to hold the wall square while assembling, but I've never seen temp bracing get left behind or incorporated into the building.



Don't know your age Bob, but in my way way far back youth I saw a lot of homes built in that manner. They let them in, and were mostly 1x6. at each corner. Then a layer of old asphalt coated sheathing (black board). I think I remember it on most. I had builders in my family, and they all built in that manner. My Grandfather told me it was for lateral strength. Makes sense. That was also before plywood sheathing and decking became the norm. It was all done by hand (8s & 16s) and hammers.


just sayin:vs_cool:
 

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I used that method on all four corners of a garage in 1986 because I was only using Celotex as the sheathing before the vinyl.


It was very common before plywood and the 20's home had that and 1x6 sheathing.
 

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I used that method on all four corners of a garage in 1986 because I was only using Celotex as the sheathing before the vinyl.
It was very common before plywood and the 20's home had that and 1x6 sheathing.



Yup, and all the decking both floors and roof was done with 1x10 or 1x12 hand nailed w/8sinkers. Sub-floors laid @ 45 w/15lb felt for barrier. Things have changed, for the better. Air driven tools I think are the best technological improvement. Now that the fasteners have caught up, and T&G Advantech has allowed us to stop worrying when it rains. All those improvements have convinced old schoolers like me to test new things, instead of dismissing them. I'm so hard headed anymore. Wife likes it as well.
 

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Don't know your age Bob, but in my way way far back youth I saw a lot of homes built in that manner. They let them in, and were mostly 1x6. at each corner...
I know what you're talking about...let in bracing for shear.
This one looks a little funky though. The stud in the picture is on the flat with the brace behind it. :confused1: Let in shear bracing would be cut into the face of the stud, right? At least everywhere I've encountered it.
Señor was saying that it might have been a temp brace that was left there which I was pointing out was unlikely.
 

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I know what you're talking about...let in bracing for shear.
This one looks a little funky though. The stud in the picture is on the flat with the brace behind it. :confused1: Let in shear bracing would be cut into the face of the stud, right? At least everywhere I've encountered it.
Señor was saying that it might have been a temp brace that was left there which I was pointing out was unlikely.
The brace is on the far side of the wall, the 2x4 on flat is just drywall backing added later.
Now that we can see the chimney brick the walls were not tied together with a lapping top plates so this brace is there to keep the wall plumb against the brick.
 

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The brace is on the far side of the wall, the 2x4 on flat is just drywall backing added later.
Now that we can see the chimney brick the walls were not tied together with a lapping top plates so this brace is there to keep the wall plumb against the brick.
Ding!ding!ding! I think we have a winner!
The most cogent explanation so far at least.
 
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