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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone:

Looking for some input as my wife and I tackle one of my first and biggest challenges.

We recently installed our own 6 foot privacy fence using PT dog eared pickets with our plan being to use the same pickets to create "trim" in the future. We live a craftsman-style home and are hoping to bring some of those elements outside.

We have a driveway that is narrow (around 11 - 12 feet) and has a slight slope (say less than 10%).

As part of the fence install, I sank a 6 x 6 x 10 in about 4 feet and used 5 bags of concrete + gravel, with my plan being to try and install an 11-or-so foot gate that would swing one way (the other side of the driveway is the house itself).

My wife are I are now a bit worried about the weight of our planned gate (wanted to use PT lumber and try to keep it close to 6 feet tall as well with some decorate trim + square holes cut).

We also planned to use at least 1 if not 2 wheels on the bottom of the gate to help with sag + distribute weight because it isn't 2 5.5 gates.

I can attach pictures later, but would anyone have any advice or comments on the feasibility of this concept?

Appreciate your help,

FenceBoi
 

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I have done these large gates in the past.
Can you find a source of a Metal gate frame that will allow the pickets to be added to it? And the wheel assembly should be spring loaded to allow for the slope.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, jlhaslip.

I was just speaking to my wife about that idea - seems like it would be the best bet.

Leaning toward a cattle gate that has the proper coverage and building the front up for curbside appeal.

The spring-loaded point is well taken and I'll look into that.

Any concern over the weight with a single 6 x 6?
 

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JUSTA MEMBER
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Your weak point is always the hinge pin, it wears and the gate sags, drags, and finally breaks.

Use the strongest hinge that you can afford, and go to a fencing supply store, they have all the items needed, including great advice.


ED
 

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Your weak point is always the hinge pin, it wears and the gate sags, drags, and finally breaks.

Use the strongest hinge that you can afford, and go to a fencing supply store, they have all the items needed, including great advice.

ED
+1. Or a farm supply. You'll be needing some pretty heavy duty hardware. I prefer through-bolted hinge pins as opposed to lag. I find they stay more secure as the wood dries and nuts on both the front and back of the threads allow for better fine adjustment and re-adjustment.
 

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I actually did something similar at my old house.

With a 12' opening in my fence line for the driveway, I bolted 2 4x4's together and put that into an hour glass shaped hole...

then, I built my gate. Now granted my gate wasnt 6' tall. it was 3' tall (to keep the dog in the yard)

I included a way to add 2 wheels to it, so it could swing in, and swing closed.

Now, the wheel closest didnt work out cause the gate would 'bind' on that wheel, so I kept just the wheel on the end. I used the 5" wheels from HF until they disntergrated, about a year, and replaced.

I bought the gate hinges at Home Depot.

Mighty Mule seems to be the de-facto gate opener as an FYI. I always meant to power my gate but never did
 
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