A Lot Of Questions About Restoring Shake Siding - Roofing/Siding - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Roofing/Siding

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 06-05-2020, 07:27 PM   #16
Member
 
Mystriss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Alaska
Posts: 3,681
Rewards Points: 7,350
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


Uf sorry it's being a pill on ya. We had to replace the cedar on the front of our place too (just straight boards that were a hard to find size in our case)

At some point it becomes not worth your time to try to save vs the money of replacing. Though while you're in there might as well tack on some extra $ and replace insulation and throw on house wrap too, do any electrical in the wall and all that jazz.

Personally I'd give that roof more of a slope, it doesn't look like it has hardly any which could explain the rot down there (of course, so could ice damning) and as I noted, I'd treat it like a roof, shingles and the whole nine. I think if you had more of a slope, and put on shingles properly, the wood you used wouldn't matter as much.
__________________

(I'm not a professional, just a homeowner who dabbles in a bit of everything DIY)
Mystriss is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-05-2020, 08:18 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,911
Rewards Points: 1,526
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


You may disagree and nothing wrong with it. But I'm old and have become less and less precious about houses. Sorry, can't find another word for it. What I mean is so what if there's rot? So what if you can "fix" the problem by covering it? I used to hate rots too but now I'm more or less fine living with it. For that little roof, for names, that return is called gable return or cornice. That roof is, roof. I would try to remove about inch of the siding and see if there's flashing. Is there a flashing over the rubber roof? Maybe a reason why things are rotten under the rubber. There's no gutter, so not much reason why water would get under the eave, unless rubber was too short. I would remove the shakes, find the flashing, and get the rubber under the flashing. If no flashing, remove one course siding, install flashing both over the cornice and the rubber and finish with a board with drip edge over it. Always leave minimum half inch space between wood material and flashing. Tight spaces holds water.


5 hrs is good. I learned to zone out when painting. Listening to music didn't work. Also, for soft wood, you're not really scraping. You're lifting loose paint. I can't see, but if they are textured shakes, yes, not much you can do but try to lift what comes off and leave it as is. Call me a killjoy, but your father has a point.
carpdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-05-2020, 08:57 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 79
Rewards Points: 106
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


Carpdad, I understand your point and my Dad's. It's probably easier for me to hear from a stranger than my Dad . I tend to get really obsessed about perfection in certain things. I think I'll try to find a happy middle ground. Thanks for the advice and terminology. There is flashing behind the bottom course of shingles.

Mystriss, my parents don't even want me replacing a few shakes lol. That would be taking it way too far for them. It's the direction I would tend to go, but I'm limited by their desires and fixed income. I think you have good ideas though.

Does anyone have a method for removing a bottom course that is butted to a roof? I don't have a ripping bar but was going to buy one. I don't think that tool will help me in this spot.
MittensCat is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-06-2020, 04:39 AM   #19
Member
 
Mystriss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Alaska
Posts: 3,681
Rewards Points: 7,350
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


@MittensCat Silver lining; be happy yer folks are so laid back. My father was a 4-star, I had to dust my light bulbs :P
__________________

(I'm not a professional, just a homeowner who dabbles in a bit of everything DIY)
Mystriss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 04:53 AM   #20
retired painter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: east tenn
Posts: 9,023
Rewards Points: 50
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


I've seen a few jobs where they spec'd latex primer under an oil base top coat but IMO that isn't the way to go. Today, latex finish paint is preferred as it often holds up better/longer than it's oil base counterpart.


I'd just use pine or whatever was available for the ledge. I'd oil prime it on all sides. PT wood might have issues with the metal flashing. It also needs to dry out well from the PT process before you can successfully paint it.
mark sr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 08:19 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 79
Rewards Points: 106
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


mark sr, you're saying that you can use a latex paint over an oil primer?
Is the oil primer superior for raw wood?
MittensCat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2020, 10:11 AM   #22
retired painter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: east tenn
Posts: 9,023
Rewards Points: 50
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


Yes, oil base primer is usually best under latex top coat.
Oil base primers adhere and seal better than latex primers.
mark sr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 06:26 AM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,911
Rewards Points: 1,526
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


Oil base's oil soaks into raw wood fibers better and oil is better protection. But they take longer to dry/cure and the brushes must be cleaned in paint solvent or throw out. Acrylic base primers have very good adhesion, cheap brush can be left soaking in the paint all day (another container, keep the paint can closed tight) and maybe better for all around surface where some of it is raw wood and some of it is old paint. Acrylic may bridge the cracks better as well although, just a speculation, once enough time passes, that may not matter much.
I never tried this, just read about it. Shellac is known for how well it sticks. I think I read about using shellac for a difficult surface, primer over it, then finish paint.


For cutting the bottom course, use razor if soft wood like cedar. Faster with oscillating saw. You can bend your own flashing with aluminum sheetmetal. Cut the shake along the edge of next course up, pry the edge loose with a flat bar, slip in the flashing, nail the shakes back, caulk the crack or crack developes but no caulk from one shake to another, prime and paint the bottom edge of the cut course. Use caulk to seal the flashing to the rubber. You can nail the flashing to rubber with roofing nail. Not many, just to lay it flat. Make a hole first with nail, caulk the hole both under and over the hole, then nail.


BTW, oil base primer may be better. Shake surface would be rough and fibers raised. Acrylic will not soak under and into the surface over the raised fibers.
carpdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2020, 07:15 AM   #24
retired painter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: east tenn
Posts: 9,023
Rewards Points: 50
Default

Re: A lot of questions about restoring shake siding


While I've used pigmented shellac over certain stains on an exterior it's not a primer I'd use extensively for exterior work.
mark sr is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts