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Old 03-17-2012, 11:25 AM   #16
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Oops, you posted your pic at the same time I responded.

First thing I would do is see if the manufacturer has any recommendations.

I'd be tempted to go with an unsanded grout due to the glass pieces, but again, what does the manufacturer recommend?

Edited to add: Also, if you haven't already done so, take some time and read through the old threads on this forum. Learn from others mistakes!
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:56 PM   #17
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Will check with them but haven't had a lot of luck asking questions at Home Depot. This is an online product for them. Will look for the manufactore and see if I can contact them. Thanks again for the help.
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Old 03-17-2012, 10:29 PM   #18
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You can't really leave that tile "open ended" at the end. You'll have to cut small pieces and square it up I suppose.

The reason you can't leave it open is that you can't fill it with grout. The grout will have a maximum joint width, and leaving that sheet open will exceed the spec.

The urethane grout is not difficult to work with, much easier than epoxy. However, for a backsplash, you won't need either. You can go with the normal portland grout and you'll be fine.

If you elect to use the urethane, and your backsplash is 2' tall for example, just start out with a section 2' wide by 2' tall, so 4 square feet. Grout it, then clean it off. Go on from there. This will keep you out of trouble.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:15 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYNana View Post
Will check with them but haven't had a lot of luck asking questions at Home Depot. This is an online product for them. Will look for the manufactore and see if I can contact them. Thanks again for the help.
Yeah, getting answers at any of the apron stores is hit-or-miss at best.
If you can find the manufacturer, they may have a website that will answer your questions.
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Old 03-18-2012, 05:23 AM   #20
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To end that mosaic neatly look at the metal edge profiles---they are available at the Home Depot.

Schluter makes a wide variety of profiles---google images will help--
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:09 PM   #21
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Thanks cleveman. I was thinking i could grout it like the top to seal. It just would have a none linear line. Appreciate every ones input. Has helped me a lot.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:36 PM   #22
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I'm sure it would be better to square off the ends of the mosaic, but if you wanted to, couldn't you just back butter the end pieces, then try to clean up around them after they are leveled and square? It might be a cool, random kind of look (even if every pro tiler will know it's done by a guy without a saw ). And painting around it is going to be a real bear.

Of course there would be no grout, and they'd be a lot less stable than the main field, but could it be done with reasonable success? Of course I'm talking about a backsplash or wall application, in an area that does not get much abuse.

Just curious.

Last edited by M3 Pete; 03-19-2012 at 11:38 PM.
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Old 03-19-2012, 11:57 PM   #23
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One more thing I got from a DIY show (so you pros feel free to correct me), if any of those tiles are transparent all the way through to the back, or they have a white backing, you will want to use a white thinset.

In addition, if they do not have a opaque backing, you do not want to use a notched trowel, since the notch lines will be visible through the glass. Lay the thinset with the notched trowel for thickness, but gently smooth it over before setting the tile. That might be more important for larger format tiles ...
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Old 03-20-2012, 03:49 PM   #24
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Don't know why I always pick the hard things to do. Couldn't just love a solid square tile. Going to give this a try as they won't be in a place that gets touched (unless the g-girls get the notion). It is won't hold I will do something else. Was glad to hear someone else had done this and how. The mesh on the back doesn't show thru when I hold it up to the light so I am hoping that means I don't have to smooth it over. Thanks for weighing in. I started this all saying that I wanted to do this myself. Should have said I want to do the "work" myself and give credit to all who advise. In my case it takes a community to tile a back splash.
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Old 03-23-2012, 08:29 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIYNana View Post
Don't know why I always pick the hard things to do. Couldn't just love a solid square tile. Going to give this a try as they won't be in a place that gets touched (unless the g-girls get the notion). It is won't hold I will do something else. Was glad to hear someone else had done this and how. The mesh on the back doesn't show thru when I hold it up to the light so I am hoping that means I don't have to smooth it over. Thanks for weighing in. I started this all saying that I wanted to do this myself. Should have said I want to do the "work" myself and give credit to all who advise. In my case it takes a community to tile a back splash.
Realistically, picking a non-square mosaic tile isn't THAT much more work than a square mosaic tile. My advice would be to pickup a smallish tub of mastic if this is for a backsplash (it's the premixed tubs of "mortar" at the big box stores). That way you don't have to mix batches of thinset, which is always a pita.

I used the same style tile in a half bath for the wall behind the vanity I did and it came out nicely (although I did have to make cuts because I wanted it to be straight on the sides where it met the walls). Keep in mind, the one thing you have to remember is that you might NEED to make cuts, if there's too large a gap against the bottom edge of the cabinets (say you have a 1/2" gap or so). Just caulking the gap will look amateurish.

I had to "rip" (cut the small tiles lengthwise) cut the small tiles individually to fill the gap between the ceiling and the rest of the tile. If your mosaic tiles are all glass, rip cuts can be a giant pita with such small tile (as it'll end up cracking a lot of the time). The odds that you can install a backsplash without making any cuts aren't that good (at least if you want it to look professional)..

I'm no tile expert, but this place has taught me a helluva lot, and I've picked up some things after doing a few tiling jobs at my own place. If you're serious about giving it a shot, buy a few sheets and bring the tile home and hold it upto the bottom of your cabinet where you want to do the backsplash and see if you can do it with whole/uncut sheets. If you can't, just bite the bullet and buy a cheapish wet tile saw. I couldn't imagine doing the tiling jobs I did w/o one.

Last edited by NewHomeDIYGuy; 03-23-2012 at 08:36 AM.
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Old 03-23-2012, 06:08 PM   #26
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At the corners (3) I will have to make whole tile cuts and not looking forward to it but will give it my best shot. Waiting for tile to arrive so I can see the best layout for it. It is a stone and glass tile so if I need to cut for the counter/tile look at end I am gong to use a stone section if at all possible. Thanks for the mastic tip will go that way. It does seem to fit this job better. One review I read says that cutting the glass tile only part way through then snapping the back off can give a cleaner edge. Any thoughts on that? Also use a slow hand when cutting glass tile. Purchased a Skil wet tile saw so I can take my time with this. Will be very cost effective if it works. It got good reviews also. With all this info and pre-thinking I feel like this. There will be cookies for all if I can make a good job of it.
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Old 03-23-2012, 06:41 PM   #27
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The wet saw you purchased----Does it cut from above the table or is the blade sticking up through the table ?
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:05 PM   #28
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Blade comes up through the bottom.

Last edited by DIYNana; 03-23-2012 at 07:16 PM. Reason: better answer
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Old 03-24-2012, 08:44 AM   #29
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I can't remember what the different tile saws are.. but you want one with a "fence" that slides. So, you want the blade obviously to not move, but then you have something to set the tile on, that slides on some "rails" to keep anything from moving side to side, which you move forward and cuts the tile. One with water is a must imo. I got a cheapish one on sale at one of the big box stores I think for ~$80, and the thing in terms of its value for the price was a steal.

Keep in mind, there are a few different ways to cut tile as well (I didn't want to push anyone to run out and spend money.. ). You can use an angle grinder with a tile blade (costs about $70 for it all), or even just use "nips" (kind of like pliers with an edge on them for cutting small pieces of tile). Nips aren't really meant for cuts, but meant for clipping pieces smaller/taking chunks out of tile. But hey, if you think you'll do some more tiling later (or just don't mind spending the money), I think a wet saw is well worth it, because it's so easy to cut tiles, and it makes great clean cuts (compared to those crappy tile scoring and snap tools).

Regarding the information overload.. don't worry, it's normal. I was the same way 6 months ago, and it's amazing how much stuff I've learned thanks to this place.
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Old 03-27-2012, 01:51 PM   #30
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Hopefully last question. What can I use over front of the tile to make it more stable when cutting? Would tape work? do I need to keep it away from the blade or can I cut through it and then remove after I put tile on the wall?
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