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Old 06-05-2015, 08:55 PM   #1
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What do you think of this butcher block counter?


HI all, I picked up some 1 1/2" x1 1/2" stock from the local Habitat Restore and I'm considering using it to make butcher block counters for my kitchen currently under remodel.

I'm not sure what kind of wood it is, but it is definitely a hardwood. Any ideas what kind of wood it is?

Personally, I love the variation in color, includes purples, blues, reds, greens and grays. I think I might just apply clear finish, probably polyurethane since it will not be used as a food safe cutting counter.

But I'd like some experts to weigh in. Is this wood too "wild and crazy" for a butcher block? I know I should do what I like, but I'm thinking longer term and resale in maybe 3-5 years.

This is a sample mock-up that I cut up that would fit a single cabinet next to the stove.




Once finished, the kitchen itself will have bright white cabinets, a cooper sink, copper cabinet hardware, and stainless appliances. The flooring is yet to be determined.

Any feedback/comments/suggestions are welcome. Thanks.
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Old 06-05-2015, 09:27 PM   #2
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looks like poplar, a little busy for my liking, but I don't have to look at it everyday.
Poplar is generally viewed as one the cheapest hardwoods. Its great for painting!
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Old 06-05-2015, 09:33 PM   #3
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Interesting wood grain there. I am not sure what wood it is though, Will defer to someone with more knowledge of this.

I do know that depending upon which finish that you use it will look much different.

And as long as you remember that it is not to be used as food prep you can use any finish that you like.

I would be interested to see a finished product later on in the project.


I LIKE THE IDEA!


ED
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Old 06-06-2015, 04:44 AM   #4
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Looks like poplar to me.Poplar is a fairly soft hardwood.It machines easily .It is not very stable as far as hardwoods go and would not be a good choice for a countertop.
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Old 06-06-2015, 12:21 PM   #5
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Counter tops and butcher blocks are usually made out of a very hardwood such as maple. If this is poplar it will mar and dent easily.
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Old 06-06-2015, 01:37 PM   #6
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It's seeming anything in the kitchens that's wood is called butcher block. It makes me wonder just how many people really know what butcher block is. I'd call it a cutting board counter and use that lumber for something else. For cutting boards I'd prefer hard maple or birch. For actual butcher block a wide variety of wood choices.
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Old 06-06-2015, 04:13 PM   #7
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It would make a unique Coffee table top and end tables top also.

If you are reluctant about a kitchen counter top.


ED
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Old 06-06-2015, 04:25 PM   #8
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Find someone that has salvaged Bowling Alley Lanes. They make really great countertops.



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Old 06-06-2015, 05:05 PM   #9
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I knew a guy that had salvaged a counter top from a HARDEE'S remodel.

It was stored in his shed for a while, waiting for just the right place to be again.

There is lots of places that remodel and just junk their old perfectly good materials.

ED
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Old 06-06-2015, 05:37 PM   #10
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What do you think of this butcher block counter?


Yeah, totally looks like poplar. The green tones give it away. Not the hardest of the hardwoods, I didn't even know until recently that it was technically a hardwood. It's not a whole lot harder that white pine, and softer than yellow.

If you like it for your personal taste, go for it. Good resale investment? I doubt it.
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Old 06-07-2015, 05:29 AM   #11
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Popular is used in making cheaper cabinets. We used it a lot in shop class, because the costs were way less if you screwed up making a project, than if you were using Maple or a Oak variety.

I actually still have a cabinet out in my garage that I built in my Senior year of h.s. back in 1985. It was originally a A/V cabinet that I built for my parents. Then when they moved, it became a garage open storage cabinet.

I have not noticed any of the glue joints coming loose. I have had to use larger diameter screws, where I had originally used Drywall screws (cheaper for the Industrial Arts teacher to purchase, than wood screws.), so that I could keep it from wobbling from the wood shrinkage over the past 30 years.




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Old 06-24-2015, 11:52 PM   #12
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Update on my test BB piece.

I decided to go with a more conventional look.


I glued it up, planed, sanded, and applied Minwax Pre-stain conditioner, and a light maple-toned oil stain.

Applied 3 coats of Deftoil Danish Finishing Oil, and let it dry for a week. Topped it off with 3 coats of Minwax satin wiping poly.

Planing it down by about 1/8" took away a lot of the surface coloring, though IMHO there's still too much green tone.

Whaddaythink?


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Old 06-25-2015, 01:20 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by de-nagorg View Post
I knew a guy that had salvaged a counter top from a HARDEE'S remodel.

It was stored in his shed for a while, waiting for just the right place to be again.

There is lots of places that remodel and just junk their old perfectly good materials.

ED
The high school that my siblings and I went to, is in the start of taking down the old 1926 building. All of the Alumni have been told that the Salvage company has the only rights to the Stage that a lot of us have been on since Kindergarten.

But hey. They stated that we can take all the bricks we want, once they start tearing that section down. The alumni is not very happy about that. There are also so many layers of Graffiti from all who have participated in plays on the stage. That there are very few pictures of the walls behind the stage, that everyone signed their names on. My siblings and my signature was on that wall.



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Old 06-25-2015, 08:00 AM   #14
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I think that your experiment turned out great.

Look at the greenish hue as Character not a flaw.

I would not hesitate in using that counter top.


ED
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Old 06-25-2015, 01:25 PM   #15
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You say butcher block, but are you actually planning on cutting on this? If so you should have left off all that finish and only treated it with mineral oil.
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