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Old 06-30-2010, 09:22 AM   #1
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trimming a cabinet


We are having issues with a sagging ceiling in our kitchen, which we're rehabbing and looking to install full height cabinetry in. Because of the issues with the ceiling I'm considering the option of putting in a second ceiling that would lower the height in the room from 96" to about 94". Though I don't think it would adversely affect the appearance or the 42" wall cabinets by attaching them 2 inches lower than standard, we have a problem in that we're looking to install a full height (96") double oven cabinet that would have to have 2" trimmed off it to make it squeeze in. Could this be done without adversely affecting the appearance or functionality of the unit? I trimmed off a bit from a pantry cabinet in our previous home to make it squeeze in under a soffit, but that was only half an inch or so. If I take off up to two inches I figure most of it will have to come off from the bottom, and it may just end up looking a little weird stepping down so much from the adjacent base cabinets.

Any thoughts or experience on the matter?
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Old 06-30-2010, 07:36 PM   #2
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Any chance of posting a picture? Is there an attic above? Can the ceiling sag be corrected with a saddle beam above?
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Old 06-30-2010, 10:59 PM   #3
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hi again


Hi Mike,
No, I don't think it can be corrected - you know what drywall is like, try forcing it back into shape and all it does is make the screws burrow straight through the drywall, particularly in an instance like this where the curvature is pretty set. I've been told by a local building contractor that the high humidity and heat here in central Florida make most ceilings sag between the trusses somewhat after a few decades - our place was built in 73. It's only really noticeable in the large living areas, and then only when you have some acute light shining across the ceilings at a shallow angle.

I'm currently toying with the idea of hanging a wood grill panel in the kitchen that will cover most of the ceiling to within a couple of feet of the kitchen wall cabinets, thus masking the sag. That way I sidestep the issue of putting up a second ceiling - or of simply replacing the existing one. I'll take some pictures in the morning to highlight what I'm talking about regarding the sag.
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Old 07-03-2010, 11:19 AM   #4
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Quote:
06-30-2010, 10:59 PM

I'll take some pictures in the morning to highlight what I'm talking about regarding the sag.
Yow and Obama is going to have our troops out of Afganistan by next July and GITMO will be closed by last January!!!!

What is the spacing of the ceiling trusses?
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:50 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timbo59 View Post
Though I don't think it would adversely affect the appearance or the 42" wall cabinets by attaching them 2 inches lower than standard, we have a problem in that we're looking to install a full height (96") double oven cabinet that would have to have 2" trimmed off it to make it squeeze in. Could this be done without adversely affecting the appearance or functionality of the unit?

How did you wind up with a 96" tall cabinet? Unless it was custom made, they are usually no more than 84". Yes it would look different at the base, as it likely matches the other cabinets.






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Old 07-08-2010, 02:42 PM   #6
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cabinet


No, it's stock standard with a number of manufacturers - they're designed to be floor to ceiling in standard 8' high (96" ) kitchens- - as in our case, for people who want 42" wall cabinets that reach the ceiling and need pantries or full height oven cabinets to match. 84" is only 7' in height, which would leave a gap of one foot to the ceiling - it would look odd next to the 42" wall cabinets. An 84" high pantry or wall over cabinet could only work with 30" wall cabinets to match the height - if you're looking for evenness of height that is. Obviously if you're looking to break up the lines and want corner cabinets a bit higher, with crown molding to match, it's a different proposition.
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