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Old 06-26-2017, 11:27 AM   #181
slh
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


p { margin-bottom: 0.1in; line-height: 120%; } Hi all. I am installing a 48x42 Redi-Tile trench-drain shower pan in a location where there is no access to the subfloor. I found this thread while looking for tips on how to connect the drain pipe while at the same time seating the pan in the mortar. I expect the PVC cement to set long before the pipe is fully inserted into its connector while working the pan down into the mortar. After reading through all of the comments here, I thought I would try RWPete’s method of turning the pan over and filling it with mortar first.


Here’s my main question: Should let the mortar dry completely before flipping the pan back over and putting it in place? Then I do not have to worry about the mortar separating from the pan when turning it over. I would place the pan using thinset, and should be able to both position the pan and properly insert the drain pipe before the PVC cement hardens.


Other questions: What unexpected problems might occur if I let the mortar harden in the upside-down pan? Should I use Versabond instead of mortar to fill the back of the pan? Which thinset is recommended when setting the pan onto Hardibacker? I would greatly appreciate your recommendations for specific types of materials. Thanks!
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Old 07-17-2017, 09:08 PM   #182
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


Used the Tile Redi shower pan for a master bath remodel. About 3 months after installation it began to leak and not form a joint. After a "pond test" discovered that it is coming from under the tile somewhere. We got a hold of the VP of technical support and he told us to send them the videos and pictures that we took. Since then, we have not gotten any response to our emails(which they asked for) or phone calls. No Repsonse! Stay away from Tile Redi! I understand that things aren't always perfect but to not respond is unacceptable. DO NOT BUY.
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Old 07-18-2017, 01:55 AM   #183
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


Quote:
Originally Posted by slh View Post
p { margin-bottom: 0.1in; line-height: 120%; } Hi all. I am installing a 48x42 Redi-Tile trench-drain shower pan in a location where there is no access to the subfloor. I found this thread while looking for tips on how to connect the drain pipe while at the same time seating the pan in the mortar. I expect the PVC cement to set long before the pipe is fully inserted into its connector while working the pan down into the mortar. After reading through all of the comments here, I thought I would try RWPete’s method of turning the pan over and filling it with mortar first.


Here’s my main question: Should let the mortar dry completely before flipping the pan back over and putting it in place? Then I do not have to worry about the mortar separating from the pan when turning it over. I would place the pan using thinset, and should be able to both position the pan and properly insert the drain pipe before the PVC cement hardens.


Other questions: What unexpected problems might occur if I let the mortar harden in the upside-down pan? Should I use Versabond instead of mortar to fill the back of the pan? Which thinset is recommended when setting the pan onto Hardibacker? I would greatly appreciate your recommendations for specific types of materials. Thanks!

If you fill the pan and let it set up and then flip it you will have a huge suite of potential issues. The weight of the thinset will bulge the pan due to gravity. You could rack the pan moving it with the added weight. Setting the heavy pan will be a challenge. You will still need a mortar bed to seat the pan properly. The best way to do this is to make access then fill in with concrete later.Sounds like a pain but I think the other method is going to create numerous headaches. Good luck with your project!
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Old 11-30-2017, 12:02 AM   #184
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


I bought one of these god awful things and installed it. The people that installed it put it in without a mortar bed! Seriously, he just liquid nailsed it to asphalt paper that was nailed to the sub floor! Obviously there was flexing issues and I really didn't want to rip it up and disconnect the plumbing to do it right.

What did I do? I drilled a bunch of holes in between the ribs from the top of the pan and put about 80 lb of mortar mixed to an almost liquid consistency and let it dry for a week before stepping in it. It worked, no flex whatsoever. I feel sorry for the person who has to pull this up. Hopefully it's not me.

Now comes the tile. I'm nervous to deal with that epoxy crap. My install is going to be rather complicated because the people that installed this put the backer board (1/4 inch at that!!!) against the studs and laid the pan next to it. I had to rip out all of the Durock, put in 3/4" plywood, lay a layer of asphalt paper, and put the Durock back over all of that. Now the CBU sticks out from the wall of the shower pan slightly (maybe about 1/8"-1/4").

In my ignorance about this product, I bought the niche. I'm now thinking about ripping it out and building one because the CBU sticks out considerably from the face of the niche. If I go with that epoxy crap, I know I'll have to cake it on where the niche screws into the wall.

I'm seriously thinking about doing the pan floor with the epoxy, setting tile, and coming back and screwing some substrate to the shower pan sides and using thinset to put in subway tile to avoid using that epoxy for anything but the floors.

Somebody a few posts up mentioned they had success laying a layer of the epoxy and then coming back with regular adhesive and the tile will stick. Can anybody confirm this would work? That would be a god send if it does.

Or ... is it cost effective to go the KERDI route for the sides / niche, so that I can keep that epoxy to a minimum? I think I can handle the floor part of it with the epoxy, but going vertical sounds like way too much trouble (cleanup).

This shower has been a total nightmare. I really wish I would've seen this thread before I bought it. It has been hands down the most aggravating part of this whole renovation. I'd tear it out and start over but I really don't wanna drop another grand or so on it all after throwing away a $700 $50 piece of fiberglass that isn't even engineered intelligently.

Seriously, who designs a shower pan that you tile but also flexes, that requires epoxy to stick tile to, and then tries to pass it off as "ready to tile!"?! I feel so stupid for buying this ... I just had to have a bench to go with my shower. If only I'd have known I could've paid somebody to build a mortar bed for cheaper and easier.
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Old 01-18-2019, 01:19 PM   #185
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


I came across this as well and wanted to share a possible solution...it seems to be the bible of trying to make this pan work so adding to it seems justified as it comes up first.

Thankfully the trap was drilled through the joist so it was pretty well immovable. I figured if it popped the nails below that would be better than the alternative of having a patch in my roof; plus there was no ability to push the pipe up after I braced it up the 1/8" in the joist, so below access would have not been much help.

For any that ever come across this...
We set it in and stepped on the drain and stood on it for a good few minutes, we then added some weight onto the pan (mostly around the center). As predicted it did not go in all the way, but definitely went in 1/2" to 5/8" in to a 3/4" coupler. It was about the most stressful 30 seconds of my life - first attempt it didn't line up so had to pull, re-glue and drop again...words were said...tears were shed...hugs and high fives were exchanged.

We were using a prefab tileable shower base and as predicted there is some slight movement in the pan when weight is removed. When we add the weight to the pan the movement is negligible. Thankfully the pan has no flexing, there is just a minute teeter between back-left and front-right corner. To correct this we will be adding the weight to the pan and using trim screws to secure the metal flashing (so that the screw is flush against the pan, then adding the CB on top of the trim screw...works well as the CB board is supposed to have a gap between the flashing to add silicone to so it can rest on the small head off the trim screw. This removes the teeter.

As for setting the pan, a friend had recommended troweling on fix-it-all with 1/4" trowel. I know it is a gypsum based product but we had chipped away some from the old shower and submerged it for a week. Custom Building also said once it has cured it can withstand moisture (just not constant...which if we had that we'd be in a world of hurt). It seems to have worked. It also has absolutely 0 shrinkage so it holds its shape.

Another tip is lay the pan flat on the ground (check level first). The pan should have almost '0' flexing in it. It took us 3 pans to finally find one that had no flex in the pan before install....get it from Amazon so you can just keep returning it (they even came to pick it up).

One last tip our friend gave is if there is slight movement in the pan (not flexing just movement, like side to side) then predrill holes in the side and secure with trim screws...we are hoping our above method will work first, but have that in case.

SO REMEMBER, GET THE PAN, LAY IT ON A LEVEL FLOOR AND STEP ON IT FIRST. It is not a flawless product so it will likely take a few pans to get one that has no (or minute) flex with body weight. It took us 3 pans to finally get one like this...so in theory if people install what they get 1 in 3 are doomed from the start. Despite the price it is not a "very high quality" product.

Last edited by IrishSwede; 01-18-2019 at 01:22 PM.
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