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Old 12-21-2014, 02:46 AM   #166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by photosnob View Post
Despite the hundreds of bad reviews on the Internet for this product, I opted to go for it and figure out how to make it work and prove many of these people wrong – many of whom were 35 year veterans of remodeling.
Sorry, you didn't "prove anyone wrong". You simply got a product to work that sometimes does work. It wasn't because of your special experience and expertise, and it doesn't mean it's a recommended product relative to the alternatives.
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Old 05-11-2015, 02:10 PM   #167
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I wished I had found this sight before I purchased my Tile Redi pan. Being a female and never have installed a shower pan I searched the web and it seem to me that Redi -tile was the way to go. First thought after taking out of box was, gee this seems cheap. Watched video a few times, thought a lot about the type of mortar to use. Purchased mortar, came home, mixed mortar and laid it. Set pan and the next day, the pan creaked, so I lifted it up to redo which was easy to do because it didn't stick. Never having installed a pan before I was puzzled as to what went wrong. Found this web site and found out it isn't me. So my situation is, what to do now. Should I fill between the ribs, flip it over and set on top of what to get it set properly.
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Old 06-29-2015, 01:21 PM   #168
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Like many others here, I purchased the pan/bench and prepared myself by watching the video (LOL). First try was with regular Sakrite mortar mix (told by Tile Redi guy to use it). Mixed as it said on the bag and spread. Total failure trying to get pan (48x30) down into the mix. Gave up and shoveled out. Talked to Tile Redi again, another rep told me to for sure not use Sakrite, but get Portland cement/sand mix. After purchase of that, I found this website and decided to go with the Versabond. Used 1.5 bags, mixed very wet (1.5") and worked base down. Much easier, although I could still not get it down completely. Left it up about 1/4" and verified all was level. It set up very well and is rock solid. Would definitely suggest going this route.
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:02 PM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
I just recently was called to a job where a new Tile-Redi pan/tray had been installed. Same issues. Plumbers installed the tray but then stepped into the thing to bounce it down on the drain pipe. This compressed the cement under the pan and as a result the pan flexed when stepped after the cement had dried.

I too talked with the Tile-Redi techies and found out either they are very dumb about their product or very sly and are trying to avoid litigation.

Their reaction to me was as if this is the absolute first time this had ever happened and the first time they had heard of it. Liars!

I couldn't use foam for fear of raising the tray under the pressure of the foam expanding. Could have tried non-expanding foam but the problem there was with the built-in underside ribs and the cement, non-expanding foam really wouldn't do the trick because it couldn't get where it needed to be.

My solution was also to drill holes in the pan and screw it to the subfloor. Of course Tile-Redi agreed this would work but they weren't about to suggest it themselves nor give me their blessings.

It took sixteen screws to tame the deflection. I could have used silicone to waterproof the screw holes but I wasn't sure that would last or even work.

So...I used Schluter's KERDI Mat and relined the whole tray and used KERDI Band to waterproof up the sides. The KERDI was installed by spreading KERDI-Fix with a flat trowel and covering the tray 100%.

The guy that told oc250r that the tile would make the tray more rigid is just plain wrong. Mosaic tiles on a flexing tray WILL NOT make anything more rigid.

I also think the Til-Redi folks are guilty of deceit by not telling customers the only way to adhere tile to those trays is with epoxy thinset. Epoxy thinset is problematic in and of itself and really isn't a DIY product.

Not only that, both the bottom of the tray as well as the side must have the tile adhered with epoxy. These two tasks aren't very likely to happen at the same time. The problem is once the epoxy is mixed in accordance with the proper proportions the product is gone in a short time.

I asked Tile-Redi about that and the guy admitted it was an issue and that I would have to measure out a portion of the epoxy components to save back for use with the side-tiles later.

ARE YA KIDDIN' ME!

I gotta' tell ya folks...as a tile installer with thirty-four years experience and experience with almost every tile installation product on the market over the years, this Tile-Redi product is in my opinion one of the worst things to ever come along.

I wouldn't reccommend anyone spend their money on these things.
I have a question. I want to reline a Redi tile shower pan (yes I had to screw it to the floor) with Schluter's KERDI Mat.

I'm unsure of what type of adhesive to use on the KERDI Mat when I'm covering the Tile Redi shower pan. Also, once the shower pan has been covered with the KERDI Mat and I start tiling can I use thinset or will I have to use the 3 part epoxy on the shower pan floor (that was covered with KERDI Mat) and bottom tiles?
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Old 08-06-2015, 11:12 AM   #170
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Mortar Shower Pan is Still my Preferred Choice


I still prefer the traditional mortar shower pan, where a vinyl membrane liner is sandwiched between two layers of mortar. Done properly it will last nearly forever.

I have installed several of them and over a 10 year span I have never had a leak in any of them.

To install one properly the subfloor has to be rigid and blocking is needed near the bottom of the shower stall. Also, the pre-slope mortar layer has to be sloped approximately 1/4 of an inch per foot to the drain. Care then has to be made laying the membrane liner on top of the pre-slope layer so as not to poke a hole in it. Then the final layer of mortar is poured over it, making sure to maintain the slope to the drain. Note that you need to use an adjustable drain when installing a mortar shower pan.

Last edited by mjdonovan; 08-06-2015 at 11:18 AM.
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Old 09-14-2015, 11:15 AM   #171
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trouble with Tile redi pans


Just wanted to put my 2˘ in that may or may not help. I've successfully installed several Tile Redi pans. To avoid flex make sure you have a sufficient mortar base. It sounds like some people may have been skimping on the mortar. Drilling holes to screw the pan into the subfloor is defeating the purpose of having an impervious pan. Tile will not adhere to the base just using thinset. First apply the redi epoxy to the entire base and sides beyond the seam of the base and waterproof sheetrock with a trowel. Let it set. Now tile over that using your adhesive (thin set), and tile will adhere.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:40 PM   #172
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Nope, the pan still sucks.

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Old 09-15-2015, 08:15 AM   #173
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by the time you're done monkeying around with this product, you might as well build a traditional base. As someone pointed out, their tech support bites. And the pan needs expensive coating before tiling. Why bother?
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Old 10-20-2015, 01:56 PM   #174
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The Redi Tile Shower Pan Redo


As I have ready through a lot of the posts, I too wish I had previewed this site before my $900 purchase. I ordered a 48x36 pan with a seat. Installation of the pan seemed straight forward but the actual process was anything but. I had to pull up the pan after the first concrete pour, remove the concrete and start over. I was more thorough on my second install, edges were all level and the edges were secured all around. After letting the concrete dry for 3 days, I stepped on the interior of the pan and, of course, voids filled the floor. Needless to say, anger set in and I was ready to chop the thing up and toss it out the window. But the $900 kept me from doing it.

After a few nights thinking about how to resolve this issue without starting over again, I came up with the idea to drill holes in the "back" of the pan, underneath of the floor of the pan between the high-end ridges and pump in self-leveling concrete. I drilled 1" holes between the 10 ridges. I then took a 6' piece of water hose and affixed a large funnel, mixed the concrete on the thin side so it would be easier to work with and spent about a half-hour pouring the cement into the funnel and filling the space between the ridges from front to end. I only used one back of cement. Waited for 3 days for a full, firm dry, and IT WORKED!

A lot of work and a true pain in the a.., but the result is good. I can now move forward with putting the seat in.......hope it doesn't take three weeks!

I would highly recommend this procedure if you have the space in the back of the pan to work. I have attached a picture of what it looks like.

Mark
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Old 10-20-2015, 02:43 PM   #175
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Good save! Stupid product/great rework. Now go tell everyone you know what BS this pan is.
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Old 07-23-2016, 01:46 PM   #176
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Re: trouble with Tile redi pans


Quote:
Originally Posted by upndnglo View Post
Just wanted to put my 2˘ in that may or may not help. I've successfully installed several Tile Redi pans. To avoid flex make sure you have a sufficient mortar base. It sounds like some people may have been skimping on the mortar. Drilling holes to screw the pan into the subfloor is defeating the purpose of having an impervious pan. Tile will not adhere to the base just using thinset. First apply the redi epoxy to the entire base and sides beyond the seam of the base and waterproof sheetrock with a trowel. Let it set. Now tile over that using your adhesive (thin set), and tile will adhere.

Stuck with this product with no alternative in a design spec for Handicapped shower. We are out of our minds with how ridiculously ill conceived the product is from installation which guarantees air pockets all the way to a single use epoxy ... leaving the walls of the unit without epoxy to adhere tile to the following day!?!

I came here looking for answers ... and I want to thank you for posting this idea! ! ! It truly is the only way this will work. Thank you VERY much for a solution that the manufacturer failed in design and implementation.
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Old 11-28-2016, 01:14 AM   #177
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


Like so many before me, I came looking for answers. I agree this product is oversold/overpromised as a simple drop in DIY solution, or as the web site says: "fit the footprint of the bathtub you remove to replace with a shower; it doesn’t get easier than that!". I bought the "Bathtub Replacement with WonderFall Trench Shower Pan" in 60x32 (RT3260R-PVC-SQPC). On the plus side, it did fit perfectly in framing I removed the 1980's tub from. However, the drain is not in the same location as the tub, so this is not "drop in", and without access from below, it is not an easy retro fit either. No way, IMO, you can apply ABS glue and drop this on top of a pipe stub in the floor and have it fit in deep enough to get a good joint. However, I did find that using a screw together P-Trap allowed me to pre-glue half the trap to the bottom of the pan before I set it in, and with a hole cut in the subfloor behind the drain side framing (I was lucky I could do this), it worked out I could reach in far enough to screw the two together and join to the existing pipe. For the mortar mix, this was trial and error, and a PITA. First attempt I just followed how I read the directions. Mix the mortar (type S), calculate the depth, set the pan in, and hammer it to bed it in. This was not even close. First, it was going to take three 55lbs bags to meet the depth called for (1.75"). I mixed each bag outside in a mortar mixing tray, one at a time, so I could carry them upstairs (2nd floor bath). Mistake, because the first bag was half setup and hardened by the time I had the third bag mixed. Most mortar it turns out, at Home Depot/Lowes, sets up fairly stiff to start, and very stiff in about 15-30 min. Not much time to get the right spread/depth and keep fluid enough to sink the pan into. Second try went better, but was mostly luck. I found two additives that gave the mortar fluidity and longer setup time. What worked was: 3 bags of Rapid Set Mortar Mix + 6 packets of Rapid Set SET Control + 3 packets of Rapid Set FLOW Control. I mixed all the packets and 13quarts of water first in a big Rubbermaid garbage can, right next to the shower pan space (so I could mix all 165lbs at once). Important change, but made a dusty mess. I then added 1 bag at a time of the Mortar and mixed each thoroughly. As I added the third bag, I added about 1.5 more quarts of water to make what was more like soft serve ice cream, than the peanut butter called for in the directions. Nowhere close either to the almost dirt like consistency showed in the TileRedi video. It was challenging to keep the mortar stacked in place, because it bordered on self leveling cement consistency, but if you mix it just right, it will hold in place long enough to get the pan on top and allow it to not only set all the way down to the sub floor, but also squeeze into all the rib voids under the pan. With the additives, I now had plenty of time to work and make adjustments. I could feel and hear it squishing into spaces and even out from under the sides as it settled in (I just stood on the pan and shimmied it back and forth). Because the sub floor was level, I didn't need to do much to get the pan setup now that it could settle all the way to the floor through the mortar. I don't know if I will use the TileRedi pans again. For that I will have to see if the tile floor holds up for several years, but the directions, videos, and promises made by the product are in much need of details and specifics to be a good DIY product. I just got lucky and found a way to get the mortar to setup right...I hope.
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Old 01-28-2017, 02:02 PM   #178
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


I too am fighting a tile redi pan that is flexing. Half of the pan is rock solid and half squeaks like crazy and you can see the pan flexing.

I can't get to it from the bottom and like the idea of great stuff and screws as its only a small area that is flexing. I plan to use the Kerdi mat over it but wanted to verify which Kerdi product people had used; the membrane or the 1/8 decoupling mat.

Thanks.
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Old 04-08-2017, 08:23 AM   #179
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Re: Tile Redi Shower floating


After reading through this thread after having installed a Tile Redi 38"x60" shower pan per the manufacturers instructions and having it not adhere, I am wondering if the pan is floating after setting it in place. My pan removed easily and I'm thinking I'll drill small holes in the sides to allow air to escape as I press the pan into the "milk-shake" mortar. I will repost after whether or not I am successful this time.
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Old 04-17-2017, 09:03 AM   #180
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Re: Tile Redi Shower pan question


Hello, so I drilled 1/2 inch holes in the sides of the pan to vent the spaces that would otherwise trap air. The trapped air issue is why I believe Redi Tile says in bold not to step into the pan. If you step on it it will press into the mortar but then the trapped air forces the pan back up... We used Versabond this time and mixed it to a sheetrock mud consistency. My son bought it and I didn't pay much attention to which it was that he bought, but I remember he said it was recommended for glass and large stone tile. We buttered some of the back of the pan but not all of it because it was 38"x60" and we were afraid of it getting too heavy. We did stand on it working it down and into the Versabond. It felt good and stayed put. A week later it is very solid and I have no worries that it will stay that way.
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