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Old 06-11-2014, 01:55 PM   #1
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Shower trench drains


Does anyone have a favorite brand that they have used? Pros and cons? There are a lot of options out there, but none are exactly cheap!!!
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Old 06-11-2014, 02:25 PM   #2
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Does anyone have a favorite brand that they have used? Pros and cons? There are a lot of options out there, but none are exactly cheap!!!
You are correct...none of them are cheap!
Have you tried Schluter Systems or Noble Company?
Your best bet may be to go to a real live plumbing supply house and see what they have, stay away from the Cadillacs mentioned above.
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Old 06-11-2014, 08:59 PM   #3
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I'm thinking of getting one that is intended for a driveway and adapting it. that would run about $150 with shipping. That's half the cost of the next cheapest I have found, but a LOT more work.
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Old 06-11-2014, 09:55 PM   #4
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I'm thinking of getting one that is intended for a driveway and adapting it. that would run about $150 with shipping. That's half the cost of the next cheapest I have found, but a LOT more work.
Now that you mentioned that...I have used those things and they come in a plastic version. Plastic could be trimmed and modified I suppose but I'm not sure how you would deal with the grate.

How big is this shower?

I'm thinking the driveway and sidewalk versions come in increments of one foot but not sure.
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:14 PM   #5
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Why are you considering a linear drain? If it's for looks then just stop with the outside driveway nonsense.

Sure, the 2 main brand units aren't cheap but they're both very well made. And you need that out of a drain setup. Out in a driveway you don't much care about little leaks, but in a bathroom it'd matter... a LOT.

Also note, you still need to slope the floor toward it. Make sure you understand how the slopes will affect using the shower. Usually, you want the slope to follow the direction of your feet. As in, toes toward the linear drain. Otherwise you're left standing a little off-kilter due to the necessary slope.
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:21 PM   #6
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Why are you considering a linear drain? If it's for looks then just stop with the outside driveway nonsense.

Sure, the 2 main brand units aren't cheap but they're both very well made. And you need that out of a drain setup. Out in a driveway you don't much care about little leaks, but in a bathroom it'd matter... a LOT.

Also note, you still need to slope the floor toward it. Make sure you understand how the slopes will affect using the shower. Usually, you want the slope to follow the direction of your feet. As in, toes toward the linear drain. Otherwise you're left standing a little off-kilter due to the necessary slope.

The good thing about the linear (trench) drains is they will allow you to install floor tile in a shower in a flat fashion, no curving around a center drain. Slope toward the drain of course but the substrate can be flat. That way they permit the use of much larger floor tiles than what can be used with a sloping center drain. Some of the fancy drains can be tiled to where it is hard to even see there is a drain there.
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:49 PM   #7
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Originally I wanted 12 inch tiles on the floor, so a trench was necessary. That has changed but I still want the trench.

1/4 inch per foot slope. Yes, I'm aware. :-)

Driveway drains come in four foot lengths. And one brand has a brass cover available. (No I'm not getting that cover)

Shower is about 36x54, entry is on the long side. It's the whole end of the bathroom. With a half wall, no curtain or anything.
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:49 PM   #8
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Yep, we've got 60cm (2 foot) square tiles in our master bath, including the shower floor. Big, beastly heavy slabs of porcelain. Tile setter earned his keep hustling those up to the second floor...

I went with the linear drain to avoid the 'standing on a cheese grater' effect you get with most center drains.

It was the tile guy that pointed out you want to be careful about the direction of the slope. With a center drain you've got slope all around. So your body doesn't notice it. But with a linear drain you want to be careful about getting yourself disoriented by the slope. As in, you don't want the slope to be left-right when facing the valves, but front-back toward them. You wouldn't think it would matter, but when your eyes are shut or soapy it might...
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Old 06-11-2014, 10:54 PM   #9
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We're actually a little shy of the 1/4" slope. But the large format, combined with an in-shower fan on a timer (set to run for 30 minutes afterward) seems to allow the space to dry effectively.

One think you do notice, when the soap suds collect around the drain that means it's time to clear the hair out of the basket under it. This is one area where I think Schluter's removable cover (ours has tile set in it) is better than Noble's screwed-down grate.
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Old 06-11-2014, 11:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mnp13 View Post
Originally I wanted 12 inch tiles on the floor, so a trench was necessary. That has changed but I still want the trench.

1/4 inch per foot slope. Yes, I'm aware. :-)

Driveway drains come in four foot lengths. And one brand has a brass cover available. (No I'm not getting that cover)

Shower is about 36x54, entry is on the long side. It's the whole end of the bathroom. With a half wall, no curtain or anything.
I'll let you in on a little secret about that. That 1/4" per foot is a typical minimum run-off for driveways and patios and sidewalks and stuff like that.

In a shower however it could be dangerous depending on the coefficient of friction of your tile. So...I would do less than that. I would only slope the floor about 1/2" in five feet of run. I promise you, when the water hits the floor if there is a hole for it to fall into...it will.
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Old 06-12-2014, 08:38 AM   #11
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Oh, I'd be more than happy to do less slope. The slope runs across the short dimension, and the controls are at the end of that, so yes, you'd be standing at a slight tilt when turning the shower off and on. Never thought of the eyes closed thing, and I can't easily change it at this point so it will just have to be something we get used to.
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