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Old 09-18-2014, 06:56 PM  
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Placement of bathroom exhaust fan


Hi all! Well, I'm here naturally, with a question. Long story short - our bathroom is too humid, so I took the 15 year old fan out and put in a new one.

- old was in toilet area (you can sorta see the door into it on left side of pic of new fan. It was 50 cfm, and the vent ductwork was pointing the wrong way and so made a 180 to go out of the house (over shower), and it was confined in that room.

- So, I took that out, came outside of the room, got a 140 cfm, mounted it the correct orientation. So now it is not in the room, and probably 6ft less duct travel time with no bends.

But here is my concern, now that I have it up and the dry wall started, of course. Is it a problem that it is right above the door out of the bathroom? Will it just pull fresh air from there and blow that out and not actually vent the steam/moisture from the bathroom??

I can move it one or two joists toward the middle of the bath but .. well, frankly I'm in deeper than I want to be already LOL. (I've never done drywall). Then it would also have at least one possibly two bends in the ductwork going out and be longer again.

So. 1) above door, but out of bathroom at least, 10ft or so run to side of house, no bends, start repair.

Or, 2) lots of work to move a joist or two, add 4 or five feet of duct, 1 or two bends, lots more repair.

I do think 2 would be "better" in a perfect world, but is it fine enough as is (without the added loss of CFM due to the bends) to justify skipping all the work? Will the steam rise above the cool air of the other room anyway so, no worries?

(also note, there is a second sink to the right of the one you can see, across from the toilet room section, and the air supply register is directly below the new location for exhaust, on the floor in doorway coming in)

Help! And, thanks
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Old 09-18-2014, 07:34 PM  
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The location is not ideal--that is a powerful fan--and will pull the humid air off the ceiling when the door is open----if you run it with the door closed,it will suck out the moisture from the whole room---
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Old 09-18-2014, 07:57 PM  
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Yes, you will be pulling a lot of air from the doorway, but you seem to have the fan closer to the shower, so it should help quite a bit. Closing the door to the bathroom will hurt the situation --- if you want to exit 140 cubic feet out air out of your bathroom, you need to introduce 140 cubic feet of air to replace it. Closing the door will just choke the fan and turn it into a 20 cfm fan. With a big fan, you will hopefully create a lot of turbulence to mix up the bathroom air and pull out humid stuff (along with some air from the adjacent room).
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Old 09-18-2014, 08:17 PM  
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Thanks for the replies guys. I do feel conflicted about open vs closed. I do agree the air needs to be replaced, but I would hope between the floor register and cracks around the door it would come fairly close, so maybe a cracked door is the solution.

I have to count on turbulence, and/or moisture/humidity rising above cooler air, to feel comfortable with it, I think. Warm air rises so, Yeah I think the cool from the doorway would/should just kinda go under the warm air and keep the flow working well. (Especially with the two foot of wall above the door to hold the warm air)

Last edited by Phases; 09-18-2014 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 09-18-2014, 08:40 PM  
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Air doesn't like to change directions. If there is any gap under the door, a half inch would be good, cool air will be drawn in there and travel a good portion of the distance across the floor. You'll feel it when stepping from the shower with wet feet.

If the HVAC is in operation that throws a whole bunch of wrenches in the cogs in relation to air flow but it will eventually dry the air in the bath with it near the door.
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Old 09-19-2014, 01:31 PM  
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You know, the supply register's ductwork is no smaller than the vents so, Between that and the near inch gap under the door, I don't think I'm too worried about having the door shut and really reducing efficiency or harming the fan.

Two showers since install, have fared real well. It really seems to move the air!

The room itself is just higher humid than the rest of the house and I don't know what much more I can do about that. I accidentally left it running 3 hours this morning, it was still mid 60s Rh. Still wet in the shower (that will be wet non stop unless I can sort out some circulation in there).

So, I think the fan itself, its placement, etc, I'm happy with. (and it's of course so much quieter!)

If I want to improve further I'll have to take other measures.

Thanks again all!
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Old 09-19-2014, 03:27 PM  
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QUOTE: Still wet in the shower.

The shower door must remain open or at least ajar to allow the lower level air to enter and the upper warmer air to exit and dry the shower.

Maybe was open, maybe not. Just an air flow suggestion. Enjoy your work.
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Old 09-19-2014, 04:51 PM  
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Improving on what you have is not going to be easy. As you suggested, you would need to get some air circulation in the room. My shower is a built in and worse than yours for air circulation in the shower. However, my layout has a wall about 6' in front of the shower door, and I mounted a room-to-room fan there, blowing air INTO my shower. Works well.
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Old 09-19-2014, 09:19 PM  
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Yeah I'm not sure how I'd pull that off without putting a second device in the ceiling. The whole shower is tiled up the wall and I do NOT want to mess with that.

Alternatively, we could just get a basic old school rotating fan for the countertop and turn it on for a bit after showers..
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