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Old 05-16-2014, 07:59 AM   #1
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Kitchen Cabinet Installation


I have been on the fence about trying to install new kitchen cabinets or pay $1,000 to hire someone. I have already removed the old cabinets and everything is ready for the new cabinets to be hung once they arrive. I have never done this but have an average amount of DIY carpentry skills. What makes me hesitate is that I have spent a decent amount of money on cabinets and would hate to mess it up on the installation.

I have a total of 8 wall and 6 base cabinets, crown moulding, and toe kick. Any opinion if $1,000 is reasonable (from a licensed carpenter that has performed work for me in the past) or should I tackle this job myself?
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:31 AM   #2
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That price sounds reasonable---cheap in this area---

Mounting the cabinets is rather simple and goes fast---

A temporary ledger is often mounted to the wall so the cabinets are set level and all on the same plane--face frames are clamped together and then screwed --

Base cabinets are set to a line drawn on the wall--34 1/2" above the highest spot on the floor--

The challenging part for any installer is adding filler strips,scribed to uneven walls--and the crown moldings---

You might need to buy an accurate new saw for the crown---and learn to scribe ---and maybe wreck some trim as you learn.

How are your carpentry skills?
Do you own the tools needed?
How level and flat is your cieling?
How plumb are your walls?

I don't want to discourage you--this is not beyond the ability of many DIYers--but,for $1000 you may wish to hire this work out--
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:46 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
That price sounds reasonable---cheap in this area---

Mounting the cabinets is rather simple and goes fast---

A temporary ledger is often mounted to the wall so the cabinets are set level and all on the same plane--face frames are clamped together and then screwed --

Base cabinets are set to a line drawn on the wall--34 1/2" above the highest spot on the floor--

The challenging part for any installer is adding filler strips,scribed to uneven walls--and the crown moldings---

You might need to buy an accurate new saw for the crown---and learn to scribe ---and maybe wreck some trim as you learn.

How are your carpentry skills?
Do you own the tools needed?
How level and flat is your cieling?
How plumb are your walls?

I don't want to discourage you--this is not beyond the ability of many DIYers--but,for $1000 you may wish to hire this work out--
I also like to remove door and hinge and put screws under hinges when applicable. A helper or dead man from bottom of wall cabinet to floor is handy.
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:51 AM   #4
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I have some Pony cabinet face frame clamps---very expensive ,but real time savers---not needed for a one time job--for years I used wooden hand screws---
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Old 05-16-2014, 08:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
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I have some Pony cabinet face frame clamps---very expensive ,but real time savers---not needed for a one time job--for years I used wooden hand screws---
Erwin bar clamp.
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:23 AM   #6
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I also like to remove door and hinge and put screws under hinges when applicable. A helper or dead man from bottom of wall cabinet to floor is handy.
Thanks for the info and opinion. I do have the tools other than knowing how to scribe. There will be 3 filler strips needed. I have never done crown molding which is the other piece I am a little concerned tackling.
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:34 AM   #7
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Do you have a dependable miter saw and a compressor and nailers?

Does the crown touch the ceiling? If so--is the ceiling flat and level?
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:50 AM   #8
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Quote:
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Thanks for the info and opinion. I do have the tools other than knowing how to scribe. There will be 3 filler strips needed. I have never done crown molding which is the other piece I am a little concerned tackling.
Upside down and backwards(other end).
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:53 AM   #9
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Do you have a dependable miter saw and a compressor and nailers?

Does the crown touch the ceiling? If so--is the ceiling flat and level?
I do have a good miter saw, compressor and nail guns. Crown will not touch ceiling.
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Old 05-16-2014, 10:22 AM   #10
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That simplifies the install---If you are blessed with common sense and good mechanical skills--you can do this---
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:40 PM   #11
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In times past I have screwed all the uppers together and lifted into place at once, but it isn't too easy that way unless you have several workers or lifts. This wasn't the norm, I especially only did it that way when there was a crooked wall. Clamp a straight edge on the cabinets and do some shimming, worked for me. The down side is you can damage some cabinets easily that way if you aren't careful.
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:50 PM   #12
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Same here---we put as many together as we can lift---and leave the clamps on the face frames to add strength---
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Old 05-16-2014, 12:54 PM   #13
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It does work, but one thing to beware of is when screwing the cabinets to the wall, if one of the cabinets isn't touching the wall because the wall is crooked, don't force it to the wall, shim it, or you could pull the face frame apart. Screwing them together sure makes hanging faster, if all goes well.
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Old 05-29-2014, 07:53 AM   #14
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When installing multiple cabinets with face frames, there's the tedious task of getting the face frames to line up flush. This is a tip that may be of some help.

For example if you have three upper cabinets each having their own face frame call the first "A", the second "B", and the third "C". If you've installed the face frame on the cabinets, lay them on their backs and line them up so the face frames are as close to flush as possible. Start with "A" and "B". Clamp the two FF's together. From whichever side you are comfortable drilling and screwing, drill pilot holes and countersink in at least three places (top, middle, bottom) from one FF into the other. Make sure the holes are not drilled where hinges will be installed. Insert screws that will be shorter by 1/4" to 1/2" than the ones you will use when installing. Bump screws in tight. Remove clamps. Do the final scraping or sanding on the two FF's at once so they are flat and even. Then go to the "B" and "C" cabinets and do the same thing, etc.

When installing, after placing them where they are to go and leveling them, screw cabinets to the wall, but not up tight. Using the slightly longer screws, align the FF's, clamp, and insert screws into the same holes and bump tight. Then do the final tightening of the cabinets to the wall. If the wall is not flat,(how many are?) shimming the back of the cabinets may be necessary, so that there is no strain on the FF's. This method helps make final alignment easier.

I try to make lifting and positioning the upper cabinets as easy as possible. I converted a small floor jack by removing the saddle, and replacing it with a piece of " plywood with a tee nut and a 1/4-20 bolt. It still has some movement. I use an existing base cabinet as a dead man and I use some spacers, or boxes as shims and set the cabinet on top of the saddle and jack it up in place. The jack will still move even gradually to get a good placement. If you've done some measuring and predrilled installation holes, you are good to go. It makes working alone easier.






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