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Old 05-15-2014, 10:39 AM   #1
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Granite Tile Backsplash for Wet Bar


I picked up some 12 x 12 Absolute Black granite tiles (16 sq ft) for my mancave wet bar backsplash. I have a couple of questions about installing it.
  1. Is CBP OmniGrip max strength tile adhesive for marble and granite OK to use to set the tiles?
  2. What size grout lines is recommended?
  3. Non-Sanded (up to 1/8) or Epoxy grout? They both come in the charcoal color that I want to use.

Thanks!
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:46 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyxv View Post
I picked up some 12 x 12 Absolute Black granite tiles (16 sq ft) for my mancave wet bar backsplash. I have a couple of questions about installing it.
  1. Is CBP OmniGrip max strength tile adhesive for marble and granite OK to use to set the tiles?
  2. What size grout lines is recommended?
  3. Non-Sanded (up to 1/8) or Epoxy grout? They both come in the charcoal color that I want to use.
  4. Thanks!
1.) I would recommend thinset and stay away from any of the pre-mixed tile adhesives. Some of them contain oils that can stain natural stone.
2.) That tile has a slight chamfered edge. A 1/6" grout space is common and so is 1/8". Your choice.
3.) Non-sanded standard grout would be my choice. Epoxy grout could be problematic on shiny granite and may smudge the surface and you may not be able to remove the smudges.
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:52 AM   #3
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Hi Bud,

Thanks for the quick reply. You're right, the tile does have a slight chamfered edge. Any particular thinset? I am going over painted drywall.

Thanks,
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:56 AM   #4
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Scuff the paint and use a "modified" thinset. Those tiles have a backside that is super flat so I wouldn't use a trowel with a notch any bigger than 3/16" X 3/16" and comb the backs 100% with thinset.
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:01 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help and info!
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:07 AM   #6
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This OK for thinset and grout?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Custom-Bu...MM50/100154560

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Custom-Bu...6010/100092922
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:22 AM   #7
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The grout is a keeper.
The thinset shown is a "medium bed" type thinset. It will work fine but isn't necessary in your case. A "medium bed" thinset contains larger sand particles than regular modified thinset, that is the only difference. The medium-bed tends to lay-on thicker and won't smoosh down as much. In the case of a wall backsplash I would think a guy would want the tile to sit as close to the wall as possible since edge-trim may be an issue otherwise. It's your call - either is fine.
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Old 05-15-2014, 01:18 PM   #8
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How about this for the thinset?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Custom-Bu...SG50/100162542

It's poly modified or should I be looking for latex modified?
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:03 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommyxv View Post
How about this for the thinset?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Custom-Bu...SG50/100162542

It's poly modified or should I be looking for latex modified?
That'll work fine!
Poly modified/latex, same-o same-o, for your purposes.
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:12 PM   #10
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Now I have the correct products to do the job correct. Thanks again for your help.
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:14 PM   #11
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Glad to help. Good luck with your project.
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Old 05-29-2014, 08:29 AM   #12
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I've always used cement board to install tiles on counter tops and back splashes. When I first started to install kitchens, I watched the tile guys do their thing. This is what they did. Maybe they were wrong, but their contention was that the drywall surface is just a paper, and cement board would provide a better substrate. They installed with a 'fortified thinset-polymer modified', no spacing, and used a non sanded grout.






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Old 05-29-2014, 02:45 PM   #13
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There is nothing wrong with installing tile on drywall in this case, cement board just isn't at all necessary.
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Old 05-29-2014, 03:53 PM   #14
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There is nothing wrong with installing tile on drywall in this case, cement board just isn't at all necessary.
Any problems with using cement board?







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Old 05-29-2014, 05:04 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Any problems with using cement board?





Nope, other than more cost needlessly and the seams are a little harder to deal with.
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