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Old 05-01-2014, 10:32 AM   #1
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Cutting and mitering a kitchen countertop


My wife fell in love with an Ikea kitchen. I have the cabinets installed and I am up to the point of putting on the countertop. I need to make a corner and the countertops are beveled, therefore need to be mitered. The longest section of the kitchen is 10'...Ikea countertops come in 8' sections. A 45deg miter is not going to be possible.

So I have cum up with two ideas:

1) Is it possible to make a miter joint with less than a 45deg cut (see image). My fear is having a messy corner. I was going to buy/make a circular saw guide and join the countertop with biscuts.

2) Buy a countertop jig and make a male/female joint. Jigs are pricey, I would need to wait for them to be shipped, and I would need to rent a router. (jig) (video)

Could I get some advice on this? Using Ikea countertop divider is not an option

Thank you,
~Pard
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:07 AM   #2
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Why do they have to come from Ikea?
Whole lot easier to just buy premitred tops and just cut to length.
They would come already routed out for the needed counter top bolts to pull it together.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:08 AM   #3
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I know this is not what you want to hear but, even with the years of experience I have, I would take it to a top shop to be cut. It is very difficult to cut on site and look good even with experience.
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Old 05-01-2014, 12:15 PM   #4
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I am leaning towards the jig+router method. I would need to purchase the tools though, so taking it to a shop might be a better idea.

I did a search and I found tons of custom countertop shops near Baltimore, but I con't know if they will cut pre-purchased countertops though.
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Old 05-01-2014, 01:59 PM   #5
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I would be interested in the jig router method you speak of just because I have been in the business for 40 years and don't know wht you are talking about.Just curious.
Like Joe,I'm also curious why you just don't go to a big box store and order the tops you need to size with the 45 cut?
I used to have calls all the time to cut prefabbed laminate top people would buy on sale that were straight.When I told them $40.00 per cut they would throw a fit.Then I would explain that if I made one little chip in the lam they would expect me to pay for a whole new top they bought elsewhere.They still did not understand and I didn't care.
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Old 05-01-2014, 02:10 PM   #6
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Hope that you have a lot of practiceoeces of countertop!! Take the. evasive,nets of what you need, to to a counter top shop, and have them make it up for you. It will be worth it. Ron
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Old 05-01-2014, 02:11 PM   #7
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Here is an in depth video on the jig:


So I have the countertops sitting in my dining room... thats why I don't go to the big box stores. :P

In truth, there were a couple of reasons why I bought the Ikea counter tops.
1) Price. I paid $200 for 32ft of countertop, that is $6.25 per foot.

2) The *knowledgeable* Ikea associate mentioned the the Home Depot counter tops have a lip at the front that interfere with the Ikea cabinets. If I was going to use a Home Depot countertop, they would need to be built up off the cabinets so the lip would clear.

3) I did not realize they were beveled. I thought I would be able to do a 90deg butt joint.

With that being said, I have not opened the counter tops can can go back to Ikea. But I would first need to clear that with the boss (my wife) and get a price on custom cut counter tops from Home Deopt.

Honestly, it looks like the hardest part of getting a good joint is getting the two sections level is going to be the hardest... still would need to do that if I ordered pre-cut counters. (Of course I say that, but I havent used a router since high school shop class!)
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:13 PM   #8
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Just checked out the video and that's woodworking 101.I thought you were talking about a one piece countertop with backsplash.That;s the trick.Never have seen Ikea countertop.They are not laminate with a backsplash?
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Old 05-01-2014, 03:19 PM   #9
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Just checked out Ikea countertops and did not see a single one with a backsplash.This is why it is important to give all pertinent information when asking a question.It seems most of us,including myself,assumed it was a typical laminate preformed countertop.
You can easily cut yours with a router and any type of straight edge.
Again,assuming it is a flat top.






this
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Old 05-01-2014, 04:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pardner View Post
2) The *knowledgeable* Ikea associate mentioned the the Home Depot counter tops have a lip at the front that interfere with the Ikea cabinets. If I was going to use a Home Depot countertop, they would need to be built up off the cabinets so the lip would clear.
This is pretty-much always. Build-up kit is less than $5.

http://www.menards.com/main/kitchen/...090-c-3629.htm
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:14 PM   #11
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Simple fix to add 1 X 4's to the tops of the cabinets.
Go to Home Depot and check out the new tops there stocking that have a roman ogee edge.
Cutting it at the angles your suggesting in going to look like poop.
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:32 PM   #12
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MANY different types of countertops...and little details can make you happy or sad. The basic el cheapo HD models comepst formed back and rolled over front edge with the formica/wilson art/whatever stopping at the bottom of the vertical plane of that front edge. So what happens there is that the water runs over the front. And gets into the particle board...which swells...making more area for water to get into....and so on. You CAN seal that with something prior...but still susceptible. Th better counter tops run that laminate all the way around leaving water to drip off of laminate at the bottom. Ron
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mako1 View Post
You can easily cut yours with a router and any type of straight edge.
Just a quick question to all, why is a router used and not any type of saw whether it be a circular saw or a jig.
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:54 AM   #14
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A router, will leave a good clean square edge where most saws will leave a rough edge. A router will need to have a guide like the one in your link or it will mess up the world. A saw would need a guide also for the same reason. You will need to make several passes with the router as chances are your router won't be strong enough to make a cut all the way through the top with one pass.

If you haven't used a router before you might need to practice a little before trying the top. If you let the router slip, your top could be damaged or you could get hurt.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:34 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
A router, will leave a good clean square edge where most saws will leave a rough edge.
Ah, that makes sense. Looking at all the tutorials that use a saw, they also sand the edge afterwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
A router will need to have a guide like the one in your link or it will mess up the world. A saw would need a guide also for the same reason. You will need to make several passes with the router as chances are your router won't be strong enough to make a cut all the way through the top with one pass.
So I messaged the Amazon Marketplace seller and apparently my email "cannot be delivered because there was a problem with the recipient's email system." which leaves me feeling warm and fuzzy about purchasing the item. I may try to make the jig myself, I have plenty of plywood around that should do the trick.

I don't know if I will try to make one with the small 45 at the end or just do a straight cut.

I am going to look into HD counter tops first. Messing up a cheap Ikea counter top and buying another is about the same price as buying a cheap HD counter top.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
If you haven't used a router before you might need to practice a little before trying the top. If you let the router slip, your top could be damaged or you could get hurt.
Haven't used a router in 10 years! I think I will have some scrap counter top to practice on.
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