Bathroom 60.5", New Tub Is 60...shim Or What? - Kitchen & Bath Remodeling - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:45 AM  
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Bathroom 60.5", new tub is 60...shim or what?


My new tub is 60" long, stud to stud the bathroom is 60.5". Seems a bit too large to shim, also seems like it will make it tough to install the drywall if the tub is a quarter inch or more out from the stud. How do I conquer this? Much thanks in advance.

Last edited by schatzi; 05-16-2012 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:31 AM  
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you could use a piece of 1/2" sheeting, floor to ceiling (plywood or cement board).. i would do that at the opposite end of the taps

then pick whatever material you were going to use for your finished walls.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:42 AM  
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If you could post a picture that sure would help.
Is it a steel or cast tub, or plastic?
Is there an upturned lip on three sides of the tub?
Installing tile board from the floor up is not a great way to do this.
There would be a hump at the bottom where the lip is on the tub where the bottom row of tile goes.
It could allow water to get in. Adding stips of 1/2 Plywood to that whole wall would be better.
That way the tile board can sit just over the tub lip and the tile covers the rest of the gap.

Last edited by joecaption; 05-16-2012 at 10:48 AM.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:49 AM  
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Plastic with three upturned sides.

I had thought about putting up a 1/2 inch something (wallboard or whatever) to bring it to 60. Wouldn't that mean I would have to do the entire wall on that side of the room so the drywall would lay even across the length?

Do they make 1/2 inch material of some kind in strips so I could effectively make the studs a 1/2 inch thicker? I could get 7/16 board, cut into strips the width of the stud and nail to the stud. This would shrink the room to make it about 60 wide.

I don't have the tub sitting in their right now to get a pic, since the room is basically the same dimensions it's hard to move it in and out so the next time I do I'd like it to be for the final install
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:51 AM  
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joecaption, just saw your edit. I think cutting strips is a good plan, unless they make something already in 1/2 inch that is 1.5 wide so I could bypass all the cutting.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:55 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schatzi View Post
Plastic with three upturned sides.



Do they make 1/2 inch material of some kind in strips so I could effectively make the studs a 1/2 inch thicker? I could get 7/16 board, cut into strips the width of the stud and nail to the stud. This would shrink the room to make it about 60 wide.

you could take a sheet of plywood and rip it down to 1 1/2" stripsand add to your studs.. I didn't realize that the room was 60 1/2" wide, i thought the tub was going into a cavity..

i would probably use some PL adhesive on the strips of plywood when you fasten them so that the stud and plywood effectively become "one" when the glue has dried.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:56 AM  
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Ripped plywood works best because it's not going to split when it gets nailed.
All you really need is finish nails to tack it up, the screws in the tile board are going to hold it up and there's less chance of hitting a nail head.
And without a picture to go by I'd have to guess the whole wall needs to be shimmed. You do not want a step in the wall.

You do now there can be now drywall used in a wet area right? It's fine to use paperless or green board at the top of the wall, but not behind the tile.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:59 AM  
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yeah I'm going to put tar paper under concrete board under tile in the shower area. MMR drywall on the upper wall above the shower tile and regular drywall in the rest of the room.

thanks for the help, more work to do
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:00 AM  
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[quote=joecaption;922578]
All you really need is finish nails to tack it up, the screws in the tile board are going to hold it up and there's less chance of hitting a nail head.
/quote]
agreed, but then longer screws for the wall board would be required to go through that material, the plywood strips and into the stud enough to hold securely.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:01 AM  
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but then longer screws for the wall board would be required to go through that material, the plywood strips and into the stud enough to hold securely.
good point. I don't remember what length concrete screws I got, I'll double check that. for the drywall too.
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:04 AM  
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use PL , it is cheap insurance.. and use drywall screws to hold the plywood strips.. then you can use the screws you already have.. you won't have to worry about whether you are into the stud or not or if the plywood strip is going to hold or not..
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