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Old 04-30-2012, 10:03 PM   #1
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Bath remodel and have a wall question


I stripped my bathroom down to studs and am slowly redoing it but this is my first time doing this type of work. I have hardibacker in use already for floor and was wondering if anyone knew or used hardibacker for walls instead of green board drywall? Thank you
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:10 PM   #2
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I installed 1/2" durock on mine, where the tile is going.
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:12 PM   #3
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I'm not familiar with this product. There is a product called Wonderboard that is a cementitious material in varying thicknesses that is excellent for creating walls around tubs and showers. It needs to be installed in a way that the joints are waterproof. It is a big step up from greenboard in my opinion
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Old 04-30-2012, 10:32 PM   #4
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The first thing you want to do is be specific on what you want to accomplish and where it is going.
Are you talking drywalled walls, tiled walls, or tiled shower?
It makes a difference.

FWIW, 1/4" hardiebacker is often used under tile on floors.
1/2" hardiebacker is often used on walls under tile.
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:15 PM   #5
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Ok sorry about that. I'm going to tile floor only so walls will just be painted white. And I have a tub surround for bathtub. Being its a bathroom though and hardibacker is supposed to be great against water I thought instead of using the green drywall it would be better to use hardibacker. And the hardibacker is 1/2" thick. Thanks
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Old 04-30-2012, 11:46 PM   #6
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Tile board is not waterproof, it just will not fall apart like a drywall product will when it gets wet.
Do yourself a favor and buy a nail on surrond not a cheap thin glue on one.
A nail on with be about 3, times as thick. It's nailed directly to the stud not over the sheetrock.
The rest of the walls can be green drywalll, Paperless sheetrock or Denshield.
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Old 05-01-2012, 12:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LJr22 View Post
I stripped my bathroom down to studs and am slowly redoing it but this is my first time doing this type of work. I have hardibacker in use already for floor and was wondering if anyone knew or used hardibacker for walls instead of green board drywall? Thank you
yes, I know hardibacker can also be installed on walls.. I assume, just like for floors, it can add extra strength to the wall.. hmm, i would suggest you to have someone to install it for you if you're not quite adept to do it so.. just like you, I'm also not that skilled when it comes to doing this kind of work.. lol
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Old 05-01-2012, 01:47 AM   #8
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I'm no expert, but I think working with a cement board outside of a wet area is overkill and just adds to the difficulty of the project.
Personally, I would stick with a moisture resistant (or similar) drywall.

I do know installing a ventilation fan with adequate CFM's (and using it properly!) will be half the battle against mold and moisture.
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Old 05-01-2012, 06:33 AM   #9
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CBU (Cement Board Units in/on wet areas). MR board anywhere else (walls & ceiling).

Its completely unnecessary to install CBU on walls that are not in wet environments.
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Old 05-01-2012, 07:06 AM   #10
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Thank you everyone for your help, it is greatly appreciated.
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