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Old 06-29-2011, 05:26 AM   #1
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Anything that you wish you would have done in your bathroom


As some of you know I have been planning on tearing in my bathroom but the key here is to make sure I plan as much as I can!

Is there anything that you wish you would have done, or are really glad that you did do in your bathroom? heated floors, more lights?

I just want to do this as good as I can, and I figured I would ask you guys if there was anything that you were really glad that you did.
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:52 AM   #2
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Up dating the lights is a given.----I often install a fan/light above the tub---the old places need a new fan and the tub seldom had its own light.

Pay attention to the height of the vanity outlet---the old ones are often to low for the taller vanities that are popular today.
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Old 06-29-2011, 06:32 AM   #3
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Depending on the counter top that I do I was thinking about drilling a 1.5-2 inch hole in the counter top and puttin a groumet and then put an extra GFCI outlet under the sink, that way I can leave stuff plugged in and the cords out of the way. I'm just worried about keeping it clean, how it looks and keeping water out of it.

What do you think? Yay or nay?
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Old 06-29-2011, 12:40 PM   #4
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Our master bath is on the exterior north east corner of our home. It is usually the coldest room in the winter. We have an auxiliary electric baseboard heater that gets used a lot during the winter. The one thing I would like to add (it's on my to-do list) is to put it on a timer so I'm not driving to work wondering if I remembered to turn it off.

I know heated floors are very popular, but in our situation I prefer the baseboard heater. My work schedule varies, so a programmable system wouldn't work, and the baseboard heater warms the room quickly when I need it.
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Old 06-29-2011, 04:50 PM   #5
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I have an exterior wall as well. I think I'm just going to insulate it really well. I would like to do heated floors, but that just adds one more thing to the project. And I would never get money out of it.
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:03 PM   #6
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If there is a shower, a proper size exhaust fan is a big deal. The correct exhaust fan will have the capacity to move the proper amount of air based on the air volume of the room, and move it toe outside of the structure. Don't just dump it into the attic space.

A typical little exhaust fan sold at home centers usually turns out to be a feel-good product and nothing more. Better suitable fans are available. Those cheapo's sit there and hum but do little. Evacuating moist air is a mold and mildew preventative.

Most of the new homes I work on these days have the exhaust blower and motor in the attic and away from the area. The air is then drawn from the bathroom quietly via duct work and you never hear the fan running.

It should also operate with a timer that will allow the fan to stay on for a time after the bathroom becomes initially unoccupied each time.
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:06 PM   #7
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remodeled a hall community bathroom year before last -

good things:
  • installed a deep soaking tub/shower, with a low side height from Kohler - the overflow is high and horizontal allowing deep water witha low step in
  • installed one safey grab bar in the shower, and installed blocking for additonal if needed/desired in the future
  • installed easy to clean fixtures - one piece toilet, vanity top, and single hole fauset - no cracks for crud to accumulate
ok, but would liked to have done differently
  • did not take tile around the tub/shower all the way to the ceiling
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:36 PM   #8
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Second B Clines comments on exhaust fans and clients have thanked me for nudging them to something seemingly oversized and on timer delay.

Proper placement of task lighting instead of one thing plunked in the center of room or rack of bulbs over vanity has gotten kudos.

Toilet paper dispenser where you can actually reach it without being a contortionist.

Extra towel racks and robe hooks thought through from the beginning.
Some of them at kid height if multi-use bathroom.

Grab bars for kids to reach things without using towel racks for support. Space for step stools planned.

Extra screw off chamber on vanity sink traps has minimized panic over one wedding ring loss.

Local shut off valves.

Built in shower shelves that made sense.

Under counter behind door laundry hamper provision.

I still think they beg for problems but some clients really like heated towel racks.
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:44 PM   #9
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That also reminds me. I don't do a shower project without suggesting grab bars. If nothing else just installing blocking in the stud cavity for later installation of grab bars is a good idea I think. Most customers agree and that doesn't really cost anything.
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
That also reminds me. I don't do a shower project without suggesting grab bars. If nothing else just installing blocking in the stud cavity for later installation of grab bars is a good idea I think. Most customers agree and that doesn't really cost anything.
This makes too much sense not to do it!
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Old 06-29-2011, 05:59 PM   #11
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The blocking elevation is set to ADA standards and then I take a picture and give it to the customer at the end of the job after adding measurements to the photo.
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Old 06-29-2011, 07:38 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
If there is a shower, a proper size exhaust fan is a big deal. The correct exhaust fan will have the capacity to move the proper amount of air based on the air volume of the room, and move it toe outside of the structure. Don't just dump it into the attic space

A typical little exhaust fan sold at home centers usually turns out to be a feel-good product and nothing more. Better suitable fans are available. Those cheapo's sit there and hum but do little. Evacuating moist air is a mold and mildew preventative.

Most of the new homes I work on these days have the exhaust blower and motor in the attic and away from the area. The air is then drawn from the bathroom quietly via duct work and you never hear the fan running.

It should also operate with a timer that will allow the fan to stay on for a time after the bathroom becomes initially unoccupied each time.
I have been doing a lot research on these fans. I have decided on the type that you mount up in the attic then run duct work. I like them because they seems to have much more "moving" power. Still have decided how big I need to go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vsheetz View Post
remodeled a hall community bathroom year before last -

good things:
  • installed a deep soaking tub/shower, with a low side height from Kohler - the overflow is high and horizontal allowing deep water witha low step in
  • installed one safey grab bar in the shower, and installed blocking for additonal if needed/desired in the future
  • installed easy to clean fixtures - one piece toilet, vanity top, and single hole fauset - no cracks for crud to accumulate
ok, but would liked to have done differently

Those are some very good ideas vsheetz, I would like to find a one piece toilet as well.
  • did not take tile around the tub/shower all the way to the ceiling
If I tile I would like to take it all the way up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Second B Clines comments on exhaust fans and clients have thanked me for nudging them to something seemingly oversized and on timer delay.

Proper placement of task lighting instead of one thing plunked in the center of room or rack of bulbs over vanity has gotten kudos.

I was thinking some can lights, some about the mirror/vanity and a watersafe one near/inside the shower (do they make such a thing?)

Toilet paper dispenser where you can actually reach it without being a contortionist.

That is the least thing that I am worried about, talk about being a pain in the a$$

Extra towel racks and robe hooks thought through from the beginning.
Some of them at kid height if multi-use bathroom.

Never would have thought of that!

Grab bars for kids to reach things without using towel racks for support. Space for step stools planned.

I do plan on doing this too.

Extra screw off chamber on vanity sink traps has minimized panic over one wedding ring loss.

Sounds like you speak from experience!


Local shut off valves.

O yea, you can never have too many shut off valves.


Built in shower shelves that made sense.

Im really not sure If I want to mess with those, Ill have to decide what Im doing first.

Under counter behind door laundry hamper provision.

Good idea too!

I still think they beg for problems but some clients really like heated towel racks.

What kind of problems?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
That also reminds me. I don't do a shower project without suggesting grab bars. If nothing else just installing blocking in the stud cavity for later installation of grab bars is a good idea I think. Most customers agree and that doesn't really cost anything.
If your going to do it... DO IT RIGHT!
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Old 06-29-2011, 08:00 PM   #13
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That blocking Bud mentioned is the best---Thanks Bud---
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Old 06-29-2011, 10:42 PM   #14
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People that build new homes around here are mainly seasoned folks that have paid their dues...meaning, older farts like me. When I first suggest blocking for later handrails their eyes usually light-up as if to say: "Why didn't we think of that"? "Good idea, let's do it".

We also install blocking for towel bars by the way.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:16 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeylikesit580 View Post
Depending on the counter top that I do I was thinking about drilling a 1.5-2 inch hole in the counter top and puttin a groumet and then put an extra GFCI outlet under the sink, that way I can leave stuff plugged in and the cords out of the way. I'm just worried about keeping it clean, how it looks and keeping water out of it.

What do you think? Yay or nay?
The vanity wall is usually deeper then the other walls due to the stack pipe. You can build a deep medicine cabinet and put outlets in there for those items.
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