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Old 12-10-2015, 11:35 AM   #16
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Ayuh,.... Nothin' can be seen in yer picture, it's 'bout all black,....

Electricity heats the water,....

Pipe head pressure moves the water,....
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:51 PM   #17
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a better picture


Howz this? The cord from the round thing to the heater is about 4 inches; it's hard to see the cord, but it starts at the blue nipple coming off the blue round thing and runs to the the little white nub against the heater.

In the second picture, the line to the left of the round thing (that has dust hanging off of it) is a hard pipe that goes to the top of the tank, where all the plumbing and electrical connections reside.

Pipe head pressure = al2x oe9e naksusjl.

Does pipe head pressure rely on electricity?

If a plumber comes out and cuts the pipes and drains everything and turns off all that can be turned off and HAULS IT AWAY, and I turn on the cold water at the kitchen sink after he leaves, will I have my regular flow of cold water? Is the cold water flow independent of the hot water heater?
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Old 12-10-2015, 12:54 PM   #18
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here they are
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Where did all the power cords go?-dcp_3941.jpg   Where did all the power cords go?-dcp_3940.jpg  
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Old 12-10-2015, 01:01 PM   #19
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Doesn't look like the plug is very accessible to be able to unplug it. I would just hard wire it and possibly move the box up to a more accessible place.
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Old 12-10-2015, 01:02 PM   #20
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Photos no good. Ya need a flash.
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Old 12-10-2015, 01:50 PM   #21
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here are better pictures, with a bonus picture of the tank (porcelain top removed). I'm still hoping a replacement WH can be installed with the existing electric and plumbing or I'm really in hot water.
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Where did all the power cords go?-round.jpg   Where did all the power cords go?-roundplug.pipe.jpg   Where did all the power cords go?-tank.jpg  
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Old 12-10-2015, 02:12 PM   #22
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That looks like and after market plug, that was not put on the water heater by the manufacturer .

It also looks like a 120 Volt plug .
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Old 12-10-2015, 03:31 PM   #23
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Yep. Not code Compliant. That outlet should have been placed higher.



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Old 12-10-2015, 05:06 PM   #24
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Looks like a 110 volt plug new tanks require 240 volts.
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Old 12-10-2015, 05:15 PM   #25
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Quote:
Does pipe head pressure rely on electricity?

If a plumber comes out and cuts the pipes and drains everything and turns off all that can be turned off and HAULS IT AWAY, and I turn on the cold water at the kitchen sink after he leaves, will I have my regular flow of cold water? Is the cold water flow independent of the hot water heater?
Ayuh,... If yer on a well, the pump needs electricity to run to pressurize the system,....
On town water, Nope,....

Dependin' on how yer house is plumbed, 'n where valves were installed,...
Ya, the cold water should work just fine with the heater valved outa the system,...

If there's only one valve at the system entrance,...
Nope, ya gotta shut it All down,....
Be a good time to add valves to isolate things then,...

As noted above, yer gonna need an Electrician, as well as a Plumber,...

Might be a good time to find a better spot for the heater, 'n go to a 220v unit for efficiency,....
Probably cheaper for the heater,....
I've only seen heaters like yer's in house trailers,....
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Old 12-10-2015, 05:15 PM   #26
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Do the requirements I read above pertain to electric ranges and clothes dryers too?
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Old 12-10-2015, 06:38 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
Do the requirements I read above pertain to electric ranges and clothes dryers too?

Dryers you usually find the outlets where the washer outlet is, for easy access when moving it.

Ranges cannot be easily moved, so you still find the cord or hard connection behind it.

It is an odd world that we live in, how some appliances can have the outlet behind them, others have them within reach, without moving or playing contortionist to get to.



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Old 12-10-2015, 10:20 PM   #28
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The difference between washer,dryer and water tank is; washer,dryer are meant to be moved after installation. A water tank once installed is not meant to be moved. It has pipes connected to it.
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Old 12-11-2015, 09:43 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joed View Post
Doesn't look like the plug is very accessible to be able to unplug it. I would just hard wire it and possibly move the box up to a more accessible place.
I can reach it -- just a couple of inches below the edge of the 36" top. I believe that plug location was well-thought-out. It would be unsightly to have it exposed all the time (higher up on the wall), even though it would be easier to reach.

The white tag taped to the tank (in the picture) says 240 with the other specs. The plumber taped the installation date of Jan 31, 1993 onto the tank also in the picture.

I am tempted to unplug it to look at the slots/holes in the wall, as I think those slots would be a better determinant -- better than the cover -- of whether it is 240 or 120, yes? as in:

Can a 240 plug be plugged into a 120 socket? Like if you went to get gas and tried to put the diesel nozzle into your gas tank, it wouldn't let you...

I could also unplug it and try to turn the cold water on and see what happens -- or doesn't.
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Old 12-11-2015, 09:58 AM   #30
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Quote:
I can reach it -- just a couple of inches below the edge of the 36" top. I believe that plug location was well-thought-out. It would be unsightly to have it exposed all the time (higher up on the wall), even though it would be easier to reach.
Ayuh,.... The power cord for the heater has to be higher than the heater, so water can't run down the cord, into the electrical box,....

Quote:
I could also unplug it and try to turn the cold water on and see what happens -- or doesn't.
As I said before, the power to the heater has NOTHIN' to do with the water pressure,...
Hot, or cold,...
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