Water Heater-what To Buy - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 11-13-2015, 08:25 PM   #16
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 38,760
Rewards Points: 9,246
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
It did in my case, because the old water heater was vented up the flue that the old Octopus was also venting into, before we had it replaced with the new furnace in 2005.

The Power Vent made a huge difference. Also the recovery rate was better then the old 40 gal. AO that was installed around 1997.
Most likely only because the BTU input(and output) is greater then he old water heater was.

A 40 gal 80% efficient 40,000 BTU input power vented, and a 40,000 BTU nat draft water heater will recover the same amount of water.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-13-2015, 08:42 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
Most likely only because the BTU input(and output) is greater then he old water heater was.

A 40 gal 80% efficient 40,000 BTU input power vented, and a 40,000 BTU nat draft water heater will recover the same amount of water.
I knew that before you posted. The recovery on the new unit is better then the old unit, because of the fact that it was sized for just one person living in the home. Plus the fact that it was pushing 12 years when we finally replaced it at the time that we did.

She did not have three people in the house when we bought it from the original owner who had lived in the house, since her husband built it and a bunch of others in our neighborhood around the 30's.

I wanted to get rid of it at the time that we pulled the old Octopus in 2005. But just left it, to deal with other major problems like the roof and minor house repairs, etc..

As you know. You just have to pick your poison and deal with them like you eat an Elephant. One bite at a time.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-13-2015, 08:56 PM   #18
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 38,760
Rewards Points: 9,246
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
I knew that before you posted. The recovery on the new unit is better then the old unit, because of the fact that it was sized for just one person living in the home. Plus the fact that it was pushing 12 years when we finally replaced it at the time that we did.

She did not have three people in the house when we bought it from the original owner who had lived in the house, since her husband built it and a bunch of others in our neighborhood around the 30's.

I wanted to get rid of it at the time that we pulled the old Octopus in 2005. But just left it, to deal with other major problems like the roof and minor house repairs, etc..

As you know. You just have to pick your poison and deal with them like you eat an Elephant. One bite at a time.
Yes. But your first post made it sound like it recovered faster just because it was a power vented WH. Which would give people a false notion.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-14-2015, 08:05 AM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,810
Rewards Points: 1,324
Default


Thanks for all replies. I should have looked in youtube as well.
I didn't make the leap from auto to this-using a pipe for leverage.
Cordless impact is too much money for me. Although I wanted an impact driver, it also belongs to luxury item. Time being on my side.
I looked in amazon and harbor freight, but I know the cheap ones just have cheap parts and metal. Is Dewalt a good compromise? Better gear type? For example, the reciprocating saws, between Makita and Milwaukee, Makita's type of gearing is supposed to be better. Fairly new milwaukee broke on me, although I was cutting through a tree trunk.
As for the water heater, I lived through Hurricane Sandy and such (just downed branches and 7-10 days no electric). They really made me want a generator, but right now I got other things that calls for money. Efficiency is good, but not cost effective. The economics experts are saying the fuel prices to stay low at least until the end of this decade, and that is about as far as I'm planning.
carpdad is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to carpdad For This Useful Post:
jmon (11-14-2015)
Old 11-14-2015, 08:15 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,810
Rewards Points: 1,324
Default


I actually checked the label on the heater and it's 2003. I'm going to try flushing it first. Anybody try pouring CLR into the heater to clean the insides? Think it will work?
carpdad is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2015, 09:47 AM   #21
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,834
Rewards Points: 3,234
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by carpdad View Post
I actually checked the label on the heater and it's 2003. I'm going to try flushing it first. Anybody try pouring CLR into the heater to clean the insides? Think it will work?
I have never used clr to flush my water heater. I don't really know if it would help or make things worst depending on if you have ever cleaned it before.

Have you ever cleaned it in the 13 years you own it? The reason I ask is if you have never done it, the sediment you stir up may cause other problems.

Make sure you remove all faucet aerators and flush lines really good.
jmon is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2015, 10:55 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,810
Rewards Points: 1,324
Default


It's about 2 months for me, since buying the house. Water is a bit on the hard side-takes longer to work up soap bubble. There's no rust on it on the outside, not even the inlet nipple. The previous owners also did not use the house much past couple of years at least. At least a year while the house was on the market, the heater was set to vacation. I am not sure if that was a good thing. I am going to put a valve on the hot side as well to make sure sediment doesn't flush that way.
I am going to change the dip tube first, flush and see what comes out, then if looks clean enough, change the anode and see if there's more hot water.
carpdad is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to carpdad For This Useful Post:
jmon (11-14-2015)
Old 11-14-2015, 12:04 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,834
Rewards Points: 3,234
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by carpdad View Post
I am going to put a valve on the hot side as well to make sure sediment doesn't flush that way.
I am going to change the dip tube first, flush and see what comes out, then if looks clean enough, change the anode and see if there's more hot water.
Sounds like a good idea carpdad. Hope everything works out for you. Let us know how things go. Thanks.

I have seen shut offs on both lines, but I would check your local code first. Usually they're just on the incoming cold water line. Please wait for the plumbers to respond to that idea. Just a suggestion.
jmon is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jmon For This Useful Post:
carpdad (11-15-2015)
Old 11-15-2015, 07:43 AM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,810
Rewards Points: 1,324
Default


Thanks for that pointer. I didn't know a shut off may not be allowed on the hot line. I guess open line in the house is another pressure relief system?
Will check.
carpdad is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 08:03 AM   #25
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 14,613
Rewards Points: 18,216
Blog Entries: 2
Default


I wouldn't put one on the hot side. If by some chance you forget to open them and the heater is on and you are working on it....if the pressure goes up, the PRV will puke and you could get splashed with hot water.

Closing the cold side will prevent any junk from going out the hot side. Once you open the drain to relieve the pressure, all is good. If you want to drain the tank, then open up one of your hot faucets to allow for air to enter the water heater and drain.....unless you already have the anode out.
__________________
Even if you are on the right track, you will still get run over if you just sit there.

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 08:21 AM   #26
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 38,760
Rewards Points: 9,246
Default


So what is the difference of having a shut off/isolation valve on the hot water line, or just having all the faucets turned off. Same amount of pressure will build up either way.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2015, 08:25 AM   #27
JOATMON
 
ddawg16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: S. California
Posts: 14,613
Rewards Points: 18,216
Blog Entries: 2
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
So what is the difference of having a shut off/isolation valve on the hot water line, or just having all the faucets turned off. Same amount of pressure will build up either way.
True.....

I only have the one on the cold side and it works out just fine. Used it the other day when I was installing the pub faucet.
__________________
Even if you are on the right track, you will still get run over if you just sit there.

My 2-Story Addition Build in Progress Link ... My Garage Build Link and My Jeep Build Link
ddawg16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2015, 08:18 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,810
Rewards Points: 1,324
Default


It looks like there's no national code against hot valve. One state, Iowa or Illinois?, has that rule. California has no code but illustration shows no valve. I always put hot valve and no inspector ever failed me (NJ). One asked why did I put expansion tank, and a few wanted the pipes bonded (grounded?).

I got the anode out and it was just a wire. No free lunch for me. Little draining stirred the rust and also drain valve is clogged. I'm going to have to pump from the anode inlet. Got a Rheem 50 gl 9 yrs. I'm going to leave it alone. If I'm here past 5 yrs, I'll change the anode then. I did buy Rheem magnesium anode with something about resistors, but store it until the time comes.
carpdad is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to carpdad For This Useful Post:
jmon (11-17-2015)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
water heater drip kdange1 Plumbing 6 10-29-2014 05:26 PM
STATE water heater failures SinCityKid Plumbing 5 05-02-2013 10:22 PM
How to properly drain and flush a hot water heater? speedster1 Plumbing 9 04-17-2012 09:55 PM
A blocked water line causing water to loose heat? Snav Plumbing 6 05-07-2010 02:18 PM
Water heater pressure relief valve confusion Flt_Simulation Plumbing 4 07-11-2009 10:02 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts