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carpdad 11-24-2015 04:16 PM

Using CSSYT+
 
Would you point me to the rules of using CSST (yellow coated flexible stainless gas tubes)? Where to place it, how to protect it, if coupling is allowed (pipe coupling if one length is short), etc?
I just replaced about 8' section of black pipe with 3 separate yellow tubes, using 1/2" pipe coupling. The original was black pipe coming up the floor under the range and brass flex tube from the nipple to the range. No shut off valve. Pros may object, but that's how I'm routing it for now. The kitchen will be redone.
Similar to how rigid tube is used for the valves when using pex, I made a black pipe angle for the shut off. The yellow tube will connect to this. For now, that will do, but for the future, I'd like to know the rules for using CSST for laying out the gas supply in a house.

Second question is: 1/2" threaded gas ball valve has about 5/16 hole through the valve. If I need 1/2" pipe, can I use this valve? Is it a constriction, or does it matter with natural gas? I used it without thinking about it before-after all, pro install had this valve.

Thank you in advance.

ben's plumbing 11-24-2015 05:29 PM

yes this is a diy site and yes home owners can perform many projects and I encourage it....but gas piping is one project I don't encourage because of the danger involved and because you must be certified to work on it....for installs, service repair etc....sorry...

carpdad 11-25-2015 07:17 AM

I did some search. CSST must be grounded - I guess if the whole house is done with this. Proflex also lists an armored flexible jacket for this? I was thinking how that can be done diy. I was thinking of cutting pvc in half to encase the csst I used - but that could flag an inspector. I used csst to replace the black pipe that was under the joists into the joist bay which required rather tight turn. It looks like it's a violation to use multiple csst like I did, but the only reason I can think of (compared to even more connections made with black pipe install) is it increases the chances of faulty connections by the amateurs. CSST is really made for amateurs.:smile:

Ghostmaker 11-25-2015 05:22 PM

Homeowners can not install gas piping if supplied by a gas utility. They may shut you off if they notice. You must be registered by the local authority to install it.

A bit about the lightning/fire issue.
http://www.nbcdfw.com/investigations...246966451.html

KC_Jones 11-26-2015 05:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ghostmaker (Post 2723625)
Homeowners can not install gas piping if supplied by a gas utility. They may shut you off if they notice. You must be registered by the local authority to install it.

A bit about the lightning/fire issue.
http://www.nbcdfw.com/investigations...246966451.html

That's not true. If the job is permitted and inspected it's fine. I used to live in MD, now live in PA and I know people in NJ. I can verify from personal experience this is the case in those 3 states. I also worked for the utility, as did my father, grandfather and uncle. Grandfather and Uncle worked in the gas division exclusively. As long as inspections pass it's fine. This only applies if you are working on your own house.

ben's plumbing 11-26-2015 06:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KC_Jones (Post 2725009)
That's not true. If the job is permitted and inspected it's fine. I used to live in MD, now live in PA and I know people in NJ. I can verify from personal experience this is the case in those 3 states. I also worked for the utility, as did my father, grandfather and uncle. Grandfather and Uncle worked in the gas division exclusively. As long as inspections pass it's fine. This only applies if you are working on your own house.

yes some of that is true...but you now have to be certified and drug tested to perform work on gas lines...either way my feeling stand ..working with gas lines ..installs or repairs is not a diy project only because sometimes you only get one chance ...2 get it right...your family is worth more than trying to save a few bucks...I have people calling all the time wanting me to get there gas repair or install inspected ...if we don't do the work we don't inspect it..why.. because my insurance and certification is on the line if something fails....

Ghostmaker 11-26-2015 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KC_Jones (Post 2725009)
That's not true. If the job is permitted and inspected it's fine. I used to live in MD, now live in PA and I know people in NJ. I can verify from personal experience this is the case in those 3 states. I also worked for the utility, as did my father, grandfather and uncle. Grandfather and Uncle worked in the gas division exclusively. As long as inspections pass it's fine. This only applies if you are working on your own house.


You may be right it is only the outside service line to the house that may have that requirement. But the gas company will also require a test of the interior house lines and they also inspect the lines. So your point of contact is your gas supplier to find out all requirements they may have.

TheEplumber 11-26-2015 12:20 PM

199 Attachment(s)
Locally, the mech or plumbing inspector approves gas piping and appliance installation- then pulls the pin at the meter. The service line and meter are the providers responsibility.
Homeowners can do their own work provided they pull the proper permit and inspection

Ghostmaker 11-26-2015 02:02 PM

It basically falls back on liability issues and gas providers do not like being at fault for deaths or blown up houses.

ben's plumbing 11-26-2015 02:37 PM

homeowners are not certified ..so in order to pull permit and have inspection someone needs to be certified..in most cases they call companies that are... and hope they will do these things for them..

KC_Jones 11-26-2015 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ben's plumbing (Post 2726273)
homeowners are not certified ..so in order to pull permit and have inspection someone needs to be certified..in most cases they call companies that are... and hope they will do these things for them..

I have personally pulled a permit in PA, my grandfather has pulled them in MD (I helped do the work), and I have a good friend who pulled one in NJ. My friend in NJ actually did a complete change from oil to gas so he piped his entire house for gas. Pulled permits, had inspections the whole deal. No issues passed inspection the first time. They didn't even know he did his own work until he told them. They don't care who did the work as long as it's to code and passes the pressure test. Oh and none of the above people is "certified" to do anything. Do I think any moron should be working on gas lines? No I do not. Do I think they should pass laws that say I can't work on my own house? No I do not. Do I think someone with proper knowledge and ability should be able to work on their own house? Absolutely.

ben's plumbing 11-27-2015 11:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KC_Jones (Post 2727057)
I have personally pulled a permit in PA, my grandfather has pulled them in MD (I helped do the work), and I have a good friend who pulled one in NJ. My friend in NJ actually did a complete change from oil to gas so he piped his entire house for gas. Pulled permits, had inspections the whole deal. No issues passed inspection the first time. They didn't even know he did his own work until he told them. They don't care who did the work as long as it's to code and passes the pressure test. Oh and none of the above people is "certified" to do anything. Do I think any moron should be working on gas lines? No I do not. Do I think they should pass laws that say I can't work on my own house? No I do not. Do I think someone with proper knowledge and ability should be able to work on their own house? Absolutely.

and like I said some of what you say it true....but in Pittsburgh only those certified in gas can perform the work and pull permits ..and this is just my personal opinon..I have see some pretty dangerous stuff from people over the yrs...so well you maybe one who can perform work to a satisified conclusion ...trust me there are many who can't and don't have the common sense to know otherwise. ..gas projects are still not diy projects..IMO...

123pugsy 11-27-2015 11:49 AM

I won't touch the gas piping even though I'm 100% certain I can do it w/o leaks.
There are some projects better left for the pros.

Yesterday, my HVAC guy unlocked the meter, turned on the gas, tested the furnace and tagged everything.

Do I feel safe? You bet.


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