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Old 09-28-2017, 01:29 PM   #1
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Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Hi!

I have a new house and recently noticed this pipe on the side drips water. It's on the opposite side of the house from the A/C. We noticed today it's quite a heavy drip now. Anyone know what this is? It is outside of the garage where the water heater is, could it be a runoff for that? Any idea why it's picking up volume?

I included pictures of both that and my A/C pipes. While I'm here, anyone know what the left A/C pipe is so goopy?

THANKS

P.S. there what looks to be a water runoff on the actual heater which would run water off on my garage floor, so maybe this isn't related to that.
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Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot-img_20170928_142044.jpg   Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot-img_20170928_142127.jpg  

Last edited by no-sweat; 09-28-2017 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 09-28-2017, 06:12 PM   #2
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


That does look like an overpressurization valve on the pipe. Do you have a well or are you on municipal water? Can you back trace this pipe to where it originates? The goop in the HVAC pipes are probably insect nests being pushed out by water pressure. I'd make sure they were clean.
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:06 PM   #3
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


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Originally Posted by chandler48 View Post
That does look like an overpressurization valve on the pipe. Do you have a well or are you on municipal water? Can you back trace this pipe to where it originates? The goop in the HVAC pipes are probably insect nests being pushed out by water pressure. I'd make sure they were clean.
We have municipal water for inside the house and reclaimed water for irrigation. All three of our outside spigots spray water like a jet steam and as stupid as I sound I originally thought that was on purpose. Maybe they are all over-pressurized? House water is fine. I found one pressure controller but it's for the main water pipe for the house. Maybe there's a separate one for reclaimed water? Any ideas?

Wish home builders gave details and locations of things like you get when you buy machinery :/
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Old 09-28-2017, 08:09 PM   #4
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Why not contact the builder?
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:28 PM   #5
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


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Why not contact the builder?
Yeah I'm doing that tomorrow, too late for today. Not confident in them. Either way I think we'll get a plumber to fix it. Talked to someone who had to have theirs replaced as well, could just be a faulty pressure thingamabob.

Same person also said it's normal for the spigot to shoot out water like a jet stream.
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Old 09-28-2017, 10:17 PM   #6
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


I does look like a pressure relief valve.
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Old 09-28-2017, 11:08 PM   #7
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Thats a 100psi relief valve. They are installed by code when there is cpvc or pex tubing in the home.. Those type pipes cant run hi psi..

If thats dripping you may have a hi psi issue and that device is doing its job..

Also look at your main coming in the home.. You may have a faulty pressure reducing valve at the main that needs to be replaced. Or you have a failed expansion tank in the home. whether at the water heater or on the main somewhere...
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Old 09-28-2017, 11:12 PM   #8
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


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Same person also said it's normal for the spigot to shoot out water like a jet stream.
Who said that?

Are you talking about at the anti-siphon valve on the hose bib?
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Old 09-29-2017, 10:15 AM   #9
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


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Are you talking about at the anti-siphon valve on the hose bib?

Yeah the water coming out of the spigot is high pressure, assuming it should be since it's used for hoses and such.

We contacted the builder and apparently we are under warranty for plumbing so I'm going to have a pro come out and look. Seems like a relatively easy fix, either the valve needs to be replaced or pressure needs to be adjusted. I hope, at least. Not sure why the pressure would change by itself but I suppose anything is possible. I will post results for those curious.
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Old 09-29-2017, 11:58 AM   #10
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Assuming that the vacuum breaker has the little (locking) screw on the side. Loosen the screw, then tighten up the vacuum breaker on the hose bib.
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Old 09-29-2017, 12:32 PM   #11
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


I don't believe the OP is talking about the vacuum breaker on the hose bib. I think he is talking about the pipe below and slightly right of the hose bib.

The end piece of that pipe is an over pressure valve, as identified by others.
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Old 09-29-2017, 08:13 PM   #12
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Yeah sorry I was talking about the pressure release valve next to the spigot. Plumber came today and swapped it out, guess it was defective causing it to leak when the pressure was fine. Weird considering it was only a year old but I guess it happens. $65 for the fix though I didn't have to pay anything thanks to the warranty.

Thanks for the feedback, I learned something today.

Though I still don't know what the pressure release is for. Just normal house water or water heater? Suppose it doesn't matter at this point
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Old 09-30-2017, 10:00 AM   #13
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


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Originally Posted by no-sweat View Post

Though I still don't know what the pressure release is for. Just normal house water or water heater? Suppose it doesn't matter at this point
I stated what it is for in post #7..

The plumber may have checked pressure but did he check the expansion tank? I bet thats faulty and your relief valve will leak again...

Im sure there is a PRV in the home...

At night when no water is used and the water heater heats up, the pressure will build up. And with a faulty exp tank that valve will trip again..

At least its doing its job and your CPVC pipes or pex pipes will not burst in the walls...
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Old 09-30-2017, 07:44 PM   #14
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Is that some form of thermal expansion control? I would not let a house have over 80 lbs incoming pressure without installing a Pressure reducing valve on the main by the water meter. If that is the hot water tank thermal expansion device I would strongly suggest you install a hot water pressure tank next time that fails.

For informational purposes. Max house temp is 140F. IPC

Most PEX tubing will be rated for: 160 psi at 73F. 100 psi at 180F. 80 psi at 200F.


The pressure ratings of the CTS SDR 11 systems are 400 psi (pounds per square inch) at 73 F and 100 psi at 180 F. CPVC plumbing pipe is sold in both straight lengths and (in small diameters) coils.

Last edited by Ghostmaker; 09-30-2017 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:59 AM   #15
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Re: Unknown runoff pipe next to spigot


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostmaker View Post
Is that some form of thermal expansion control? I would not let a house have over 80 lbs incoming pressure without installing a Pressure reducing valve on the main by the water meter. If that is the hot water tank thermal expansion device I would strongly suggest you install a hot water pressure tank next time that fails.

For informational purposes. Max house temp is 140F. IPC

Most PEX tubing will be rated for: 160 psi at 73F. 100 psi at 180F. 80 psi at 200F.


The pressure ratings of the CTS SDR 11 systems are 400 psi (pounds per square inch) at 73 F and 100 psi at 180 F. CPVC plumbing pipe is sold in both straight lengths and (in small diameters) coils.
Once you put a PRV valve on a home you make it a closed system... Then when the water heater heats up the thrmal expansion cant push back to the street. So an expansion tank is added to the homes water system..

Now most plumber fault by not adjusting the air charge in these tanks to the homes pressure.. They come pre charged to 40 psi.. But if the home is 70 psi with the PRV valve then additional air needs to be added to make it match ( 70 psi)

You do this before you install the tank..

Last as I said. A house may have all copper pipe.. If say an addition was added and pex, or cpvc is used anywhere in the home, code dictates a 100 psi relief valve must be added to the system.

When you see these relief valves as the OP posted you can guarantee there is plastic piping in the home....
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