Un-soldering Old Fitting Problem - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 03-03-2015, 12:19 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 154
Rewards Points: 274
Default


I was working on the return hose on the left side without the gate valve, that runs to my condo sink, bathroom, so I had a hose on the drain of the water heater, and turned the water on the sink etc. let it run for a while then I disconnected the flex pipe from the water heater, absolutely zero water came out. As mentioned the stub connects to an elbow that goes up to my ceiling so I figured if any water was in the line, it would have come out.
dfphoto is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to dfphoto For This Useful Post:
jmon (03-03-2015)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-03-2015, 01:19 PM   #17
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,944
Rewards Points: 3,454
Default


Good. Should have no problem unsoldering it now.
jmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-04-2015, 11:20 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 154
Rewards Points: 274
Default

unsoldering gate valve question


Hi group as per my other post, I'm wanting to replace my water heater fittings but I've had some nervousness and now I am wanting a little clarification. I viewed a video online concerning soldering copper and bronze valves. The guy said you don't heat the valve because the thickness of the bronze is very different than the copper. He said I am suppose to heat the copper across the valve. If I do that in my situation I would be 2" from my drywall.

So can anyone with torch/solder experience tell me the best method? My big concerns are the 3" stub is connected to the main water TEE and since I live in a condo I'm afraid of loosening the solder joint on the TEE by using more heat removing the gate valve. Another poster told me to cut the stub off and then add a coupler to extend, or use my sharkbite backup idea.

Thank you, I don't think this is super hard but I'm scared a bit since it's a condo.
Attached Thumbnails
Un-soldering old fitting problem-plumbing.jpg   Un-soldering old fitting problem-plumbing-2.jpg   Un-soldering old fitting problem-plumbing3.jpg  
dfphoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 03-04-2015, 11:43 PM   #19
Mad Scientist
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 951
Default


Wrap a wet rag around the T if you're worried, that'll keep the heat from loosening that joint. I've never put a lot of thought into desoldering a valve like that, I'd just grab the valve in large pliers, apply the torch flame right where the copper meets the valve, and twist/pull it off when the solder melts.

Have another wet rag handy and wipe the excess solder off the remaining copper stub before it cools, that'll make it much easier to get a new fitting or valve on the stub.
McSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2015, 11:49 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 154
Rewards Points: 274
Default

huh


Hi I appreciate your reply, when I put the wet rag on the other side to remove I had heat on the fitting for almost 2 min and I got nervous as I was trying to pull it off with pliers and nothing was happening.

ON the other post, I wrote that I did turn the flame down a bit because of the walls being so close to where I was working. I'm a newbie to torching anything. I welded in college but that was it.

Would be moving the flame around a lot or keep it in one area it's really tight with the water heater installed and I can't really move the torch around easily.

Thanks for offering your advice.
dfphoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2015, 12:05 AM   #21
Mad Scientist
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 951
Default


You'll want to use the hottest flame you can manage, really. The idea is to heat that joint to the melting point before all the heat radiates away to heat up the rest of that big brass valve body. If the walls are really close and you're risking burn marks, a small piece of sheet metal or the like makes a pretty good heat deflector.

With that T being so close, the wet rag might be cooling things down too much, too. I suggested it, but I hardly ever do it myself; even if the solder softens in the other joints, it generally stays where it is and continues to make a good connection. The only problem you might have is the stub coming out of the T instead of the valve coming off of the stub. From the pictures, that wouldn't be too hard to fix if it happened, but sweating pipe definitely has a bit of a learning curve.

If you get the hottest part of the torch flame aimed at the joint between pipe & valve with the torch turned all the way up, in 30 seconds or so the solder will turn shiny and start to liquify. You should be able to gently twist and pull the valve off the pipe.

You can try the wet rag on the T again or not, I'm not completely sure if it's a help or a hindrance to you in this situation.

That's about all the advice I've got. This particular situation wouldn't be my first choice for learning how to sweat (or un-sweat) copper, but it's not that bad either.
McSteve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2015, 01:25 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 154
Rewards Points: 274
Default

Thanks


Thanks McSteve,

I have been practicing a bit and of course no problems, but in this situation it's more nerve. Maybe I should try the Mapp gas instead of propane, but the day I tried was a huge cold front (for Ca.) low 40-50 and dark, thunder etc... horror movie style having the flame on for almost 2 min. it got to me, I'm pissed now because this isn't that hard. Thanks so much, I will try the return again and see if I can make that happen if so I will go for the gate valve.
dfphoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2015, 04:23 AM   #23
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 38,875
Rewards Points: 9,474
Default


Merged threads.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2015, 09:35 AM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1,304
Rewards Points: 2,600
Default


here's a tip, clean all that old piping crud really good until you get what looks like "new" pipe (wire wheel on cordless, small wire brush, etc etc). trying to heat it with that crud in there can be a hindrance because the crud acts like an insulator, etc.
concrete_joe is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to concrete_joe For This Useful Post:
jmon (03-05-2015)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How big of a problem might it be when a sticker is left in an ABS pipe fitting?!?!? BrianJ Plumbing 4 12-01-2012 07:12 AM
Compression fitting with copper tubing for dishwasher DK75 Plumbing 4 04-27-2012 06:47 PM
75 year chimney leak problem mstanleyg Building & Construction 10 03-30-2010 12:38 PM
Stymied by window leakage problem. Matth3w General DIY Discussions 5 06-11-2008 06:26 PM
Post-Tension Slab Problem Advice/Help Mike McBride Building & Construction 2 01-09-2007 01:51 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts