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Old 12-01-2015, 03:51 PM   #1
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Soldering tips?


Hey all,

I wasn't sure if any of you had any soldering tips before I go and attack some plumbing... (My wife will murder me if we don't have water back on in the house...)

I'm mainly concerned about over heating copper. Any tips with that? I'll be using MAP I think (mainly due to 1" copper i'll be working with), unless Propane is safer.

Thanks for any tips/advice!
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Old 12-01-2015, 04:11 PM   #2
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Experiment with some pieces first on work bench.

Deburr pipe and fittings Clean the pipe and fittings inside and out with emory cloth. Then apply flux inside and out, put pieces together and start heating it up with torch. Touch the solder to fittings, when it starts to melt and draw the solder in, remove torch and make sure the solder is drawn in all around the fitting . Wipe down any excess solder with wet cloth for a nice finish.

Practice a few times and Google some utube videos on it. Then go for it.

Last edited by jmon; 12-01-2015 at 04:14 PM.
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Old 12-01-2015, 04:45 PM   #3
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Quote:
Clean the pipe and fittings inside and out with emory cloth.
Ayuh,.... I prefer a wire brush, but shiny metal Clean is the key,.....

Quote:
I'm mainly concerned about over heating copper.
Keep touchin' the area with the solder,... When it runs, remove the heat,....
If it stops runnin', add more heat,....
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Old 12-01-2015, 04:49 PM   #4
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Practice on several pieces of the size you will be working with.

Have patience.
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Old 12-01-2015, 04:56 PM   #5
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What about over-heating when removing a fitting? Just apply bits of heat, and work it off?

There aren't any warning signs when it comes to over heating, are there?
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Old 12-01-2015, 05:01 PM   #6
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Should not be an issue.
All water needs to be drained from the line before heating.
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Old 12-01-2015, 05:06 PM   #7
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Concentrate the heat where you want the solder to flow to, not where it enters between the two fittings.
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Old 12-01-2015, 06:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizzygone View Post
What about over-heating when removing a fitting? Just apply bits of heat, and work it off?

There aren't any warning signs when it comes to over heating, are there?
Yes there are. It will start to turn black.
When you get to that point it almost seems like the fitting is sticking to the pipe even though it's hot enough to melt solder.
Keep most of heat on the fitting. This will expand the fitting more than the pipe, helps separate the two.
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Old 12-01-2015, 07:21 PM   #9
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Clean.....pipe has to be clean. I typically scrub the pipe with 120 grit sandpaper....and then follow up with the standard pipe wire brush.

Debur.....the pipe cutter will create a lip on the inside of the pipe. Debur it. If you don't, you will get a lot more water noise and you create erosion of the joint which can lead to a leak.

Test Fit....fittings should be snug but not tight....or too loose.

Clean again....

Flux.....liberal application of flux.

Gas....use Mapp gas....yellow can (not the blue can). It's a bit hotter.

Heat......touch the solder to the part as you heat it. If the tip of the solder does not melt immediately, it's not hot enough. You will know when it is hot enough...solder will turn to liquid and get sucked up into the joint. You don't want so much solder so that it puddles, but should suck up into the joint.



When done right, you will see a silver ring on the inside that indicates the whole joint is flodded with solder.



Wipe with wet cloth.....this does several things. It sets the joint....it cools it off so you can handle it....and it cleans the excess solder and flux off.
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Old 12-01-2015, 07:28 PM   #10
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If you feel like reading here's an old thread--
http://www.diychatroom.com/f98/how-s...r-pipes-39020/

I don't agree with all the points made in the thread, but for the most part it's good.
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Old 12-01-2015, 07:33 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEplumber View Post
points made in the thread, but for the most part it's good.
It's ok E.....I can take the criticism..

Maybe it's not exactly how a professional would do it....but, it's worked for me

I'd rather the OP hear correct info than 'marginal' info....regardless of who's feelings get hurt.
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Old 12-01-2015, 07:42 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
It's ok E.....I can take the criticism..

Maybe it's not exactly how a professional would do it....but, it's worked for me

I'd rather the OP hear correct info than 'marginal' info....regardless of who's feelings get hurt.
Hey, I don't have an issue with what you posted I just remembered that old thread from way back.

Well, one little issue- ya just need an evenly applied film covering of flux. If it goobers up on the outside as you fit the pipe, then there's too much...
Solder follows flux. So, if the flux melts and runs down the pipe or fitting, so will the solder and that makes for an ugly joint
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Old 12-01-2015, 07:51 PM   #13
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I don't agree with liberal on the flux, I was taught to apply a thin, even film.
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Old 12-01-2015, 08:24 PM   #14
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I 'kinda' agree on the flux points......kinda

Part of the problem is one's opinion of what is 'liberal'.

Second issue is the new batch of water based flux being offered at the big box stores boils off well before you apply the solder....hence, no flux to follow.

I was suggesting 'liberal' because most people tend to apply too much heat and not clean joints well enough. More flux will tend to compensate. Not the total solution...but helps
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Old 12-01-2015, 08:40 PM   #15
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Any suggestions on flux brand to use? What about solder?
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