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Old 01-21-2019, 01:08 PM   #31
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


Please excuse me. I truly did not know that what I did is considered thread hijacking. My apologies.

You learn something every day.

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Regardless, thread hijacking is poor form.
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Old 01-21-2019, 01:20 PM   #32
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by stripedbass View Post
Please excuse me. I truly did not know that what I did is considered thread hijacking. My apologies.

You learn something every day.
No worries man, life's too short to be a curmudgeon!
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Old 01-21-2019, 01:23 PM   #33
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


Before you switch out, you should do one more thing that won't cost you much money at all and is pretty easy to do (provided you're minimally handy).


Check the dip tube in the tank to make sure it's not broken off.


Chances are, your cold water supply and your hot water output are at the top of the tank. The dip tube pushes the cold water to the bottom of the tank where the burner and thermostat are. If your dip tube breaks, the cold water stays at the top of the tank, where it is pushed out the hot water return. Since the hot water stays at the bottom of the tank and slowly mixes with the cold water, it doesn't rapidly cool the thermostat and send a signal to your burner to fire. So your recovery is much slower.


Search YouTube for instructions on how to do this. As long as your joint isn't soldered at the joint (mine is) then it's really easy.


Gas HW heaters are awesome and can supply a LOT of hot water before it starts getting cold. Mine's 50 gallons and I've never ran out.
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Old 01-21-2019, 01:26 PM   #34
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by jobondur View Post
Before you switch out, you should do one more thing that won't cost you much money at all and is pretty easy to do (provided you're minimally handy).


Check the dip tube in the tank to make sure it's not broken off.


Chances are, your cold water supply and your hot water output are at the top of the tank. The dip tube pushes the cold water to the bottom of the tank where the burner and thermostat are. If your dip tube breaks, the cold water stays at the top of the tank, where it is pushed out the hot water return. Since the hot water stays at the bottom of the tank and slowly mixes with the cold water, it doesn't rapidly cool the thermostat and send a signal to your burner to fire. So your recovery is much slower.


Search YouTube for instructions on how to do this. As long as your joint isn't soldered at the joint (mine is) then it's really easy.


Gas HW heaters are awesome and can supply a LOT of hot water before it starts getting cold. Mine's 50 gallons and I've never ran out.
Good call, that should be easy enough.
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Old 01-21-2019, 02:38 PM   #35
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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SeniorSitizen,

Your answer and that of clawlan very interesting! But I don't want to read too much into it unless I have more proof.
Then check yours for yourself. It aint't rocket science. Your phone has a stop watch and you surely have a container to measure with.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:36 AM   #36
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


I just replaced the anode rod in my 35 year old gas water heater (Montgomery Ward), and drained the crud out of it (first time in many years).



We have a solar preheater which saves some gas (it's homemade, doesn't get a real high temperature, though).



Suppose one of these days I'll need a new one. They usually let you know when they're faulty...
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:39 AM   #37
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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They usually let you know when they're faulty...
Yea, if my basement wasn't finished and had a sump pump, I'd be less scared of springing a leak!
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:40 AM   #38
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


Finally on the 3rd page the first thing that should have been checked, the dip tube.

I see coldiron hasn't changed a bit since the last time I visited here.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:46 AM   #39
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by vandamme View Post
I just replaced the anode rod in my 35 year old gas water heater (Montgomery Ward), and drained the crud out of it (first time in many years).



We have a solar preheater which saves some gas (it's homemade, doesn't get a real high temperature, though).



Suppose one of these days I'll need a new one. They usually let you know when they're faulty...
How hard to get the rod out after 35 years?
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:49 AM   #40
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I had the same issue and resolved it... after lots of research, I came up with a few solutions... 1. Buy a larger tank. High cost made me explore more... 2. Buy a second tank (we have 50g with 6 people). Again large expense and I'd need to install more venting for the second tank. 3. Buy tankless heater. I had one of these before. Unlimited hot water but you lose flow rate, sometimes an issue... It can only heat instantly if the water isn't running too fast as it wouldn't have enough time to heat it... Also needs different venting, so not an option unless I open walls... I didnt go with any of these, due to reasons above. Instead, i bought a tank booster. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Heatguar...4409/203721329

If you know basic plumbing you can do this yourself, like I did. You do have to turn your heat up one (mine was on a and now on b). You mentioned yours is already turned up, but as others have said, your water is likely too hot, over 120f, so could burn... this device is similar to a thermostatic mixer shower valve. You increase the hot water heat, but it uses cold to mix until at 120f again. There is a heat sensitive sticker in the box that you put on the hot pipe. Dont fully trust this though. Run the hot water at each location and use a temp probe (I used my food probe)... this now gives me approximately 80g of hot water (120f) from my existing 50g tank! It's awesome. I've had it about 3 months and have yet to run out of hot water. Wife has a big soaker tub and can finally fill it up. So long as you stagger usage, as explained before, run dishwasher overnight, laundry in the day, shower/bathe inbetween, it will be enough. This fills my wife's soakers tub to the top. Also, if maintenance has been poor in the past, check and buy another anode rod. This will help your tank last longer. Hope this helps as much as it helped me.
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:58 AM   #41
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by bob22 View Post
How hard to get the rod out after 35 years?

I've heard horror stories, but the worst that could happen is I'd need to replace my 35 year old tank.



I have a cheap electric impact wrench and sockets, so I just buzzed away on it for a couple seconds, and it came right out. I had to cut the rod to get it out; the new one was a flex in the middle type. Replaced in a minute, didn't leak.



I kept the old one just in case; still had plenty of life left in it but was covered in deposits which can be chipped off (we have a well and no water softener).



So I'll be checking it every few years from now on, and have a spare handy. But if you smell stinky water, it's time to check.
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:02 AM   #42
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by clawlan View Post
So my wife has been frustrated that the hot water has been running out when she takes long baths/showers (she likes really hot water). We also have 1 toddler and another on the way who take baths frequently.
Have you considered switching to a Hot Water on Demand heater (HWOD)?

I have an electric HWOD unit and in the 5 years I've owned it there have been zero problems...but it was necessary in my area, where we have a lot of calcium and scale, to put in a "Body Glove" filter. That filter helps control scale residue on the electric heating elements, which is what causes them to burn out.

They come in "lodge size", whole house size, and point of use size. If it were up to me I'd use one small unit at each location where you'd use hot water. The smaller units with which I'm familiar require a single 240V energy source, the larger units (like mine) use two...or, more, depending on how large a unit you choose. For a unit that was described as being capable of offering enough hot water for a 4-bedroom "lodge" the cost was slightly over $400...about the amount you'd expect to pay for a good tank type heater and (in my experience) much more reliable. They do come in gas units, too, which would IMHO be an even MORE reliable option if you have adequate natural gas delivery (my electrical unit is useless when the electricity is off). They can be power hungry when in use, but when not in use they use ZERO energy, just waiting for the faucet to turn on (the units have a flow sensor that turns the heater tanks on when the flow exceeds half a gallon a minute, IIRC).

It might be an option for your circumstances.

Cheers from Dugly!
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:04 AM   #43
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikiek View Post
I had the same issue and resolved it... after lots of research, I came up with a few solutions... 1. Buy a larger tank. High cost made me explore more... 2. Buy a second tank (we have 50g with 6 people). Again large expense and I'd need to install more venting for the second tank. 3. Buy tankless heater. I had one of these before. Unlimited hot water but you lose flow rate, sometimes an issue... It can only heat instantly if the water isn't running too fast as it wouldn't have enough time to heat it... Also needs different venting, so not an option unless I open walls... I didnt go with any of these, due to reasons above. Instead, i bought a tank booster. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Heatguar...4409/203721329

If you know basic plumbing you can do this yourself, like I did. You do have to turn your heat up one (mine was on a and now on b). You mentioned yours is already turned up, but as others have said, your water is likely too hot, over 120f, so could burn... this device is similar to a thermostatic mixer shower valve. You increase the hot water heat, but it uses cold to mix until at 120f again. There is a heat sensitive sticker in the box that you put on the hot pipe. Dont fully trust this though. Run the hot water at each location and use a temp probe (I used my food probe)... this now gives me approximately 80g of hot water (120f) from my existing 50g tank! It's awesome. I've had it about 3 months and have yet to run out of hot water. Wife has a big soaker tub and can finally fill it up. So long as you stagger usage, as explained before, run dishwasher overnight, laundry in the day, shower/bathe inbetween, it will be enough. This fills my wife's soakers tub to the top. Also, if maintenance has been poor in the past, check and buy another anode rod. This will help your tank last longer. Hope this helps as much as it helped me.
Yea, in one of my previous posts, I suggested the idea of a (electric) tank booster. My 2 concerns with those are reduced flow rate and significant increase in electricity usage. I am not familiar with this non-electric type that you linked too. I'l have to look into this.

With a tankless unit, I would just get a unit that had a high enough flow rate (9+gpm), but you are right that they are significantly more expensive.
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:05 AM   #44
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


Quote:
Originally Posted by YerDugliness View Post
Have you considered switching to a Hot Water on Demand heater (HWOD)?

I have an electric HWOD unit and in the 5 years I've owned it there have been zero problems...but it was necessary in my area, where we have a lot of calcium and scale, to put in a "Body Glove" filter. That filter helps control scale residue on the electric heating elements, which is what causes them to burn out.

They come in "lodge size", whole house size, and point of use size. If it were up to me I'd use one small unit at each location where you'd use hot water. The smaller units with which I'm familiar require a single 240V energy source, the larger units (like mine) use two...or, more, depending on how large a unit you choose. For a unit that was described as being capable of offering enough hot water for a 4-bedroom "lodge" the cost was slightly over $400...about the amount you'd expect to pay for a good tank type heater and (in my experience) much more reliable. They do come in gas units, too, which would IMHO be an even MORE reliable option if you have adequate natural gas delivery (my electrical unit is useless when the electricity is off). They can be power hungry when in use, but when not in use they use ZERO energy, just waiting for the faucet to turn on (the units have a flow sensor that turns the heater tanks on when the flow exceeds half a gallon a minute, IIRC).

It might be an option for your circumstances.

Cheers from Dugly!
Yea, I am leaning towards a tankless unit.
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Old 01-23-2019, 11:07 AM   #45
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Re: Should I replace my 7 y/o Water Heater?


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Originally Posted by vandamme View Post
I kept the old one just in case; still had plenty of life left in it but was covered in deposits which can be chipped off (we have a well and no water softener).

Being the dip tube had deposits which could be chipped off, consider replacing the Temperature/Pressure relief valve if you haven't. I replaced a heater of about 20 years old with water conditions similar and there was no way that valve could have ever worked as designed with the mineral deposits it had accumulated.
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